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New ED HARDY Exhibit: “Visionary Subversive” // oct.5-nov.2

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Ed Hardy: Visionary Subversive is a major exhibition of original art by one of the world’s most well-known culture icons. Original works presented by Varnish Fine Art at The Midway Show Dates: October 5 to November 2, 2015 Artist Reception: Thursday October 29, 7-11pm Closing Party: Monday November 2, 7-11pm  Co-curated by Hardy’s assistant Trevor Ewald and presented by Varnish Fine Art at The Midway in San Francisco, this month-long art show includes Ed Hardy’s self-described “Automatic”, “Crazy Animal”, “Eyecon” and “Rose of No Man’s Land” paintings alongside the debut of his porcelain “Paños” inspired by jailhouse handkerchief art. With a half-century of fierce dedication as an artist, art historian and writer, Hardy seamlessly fuses disparate artistic elements to his own personal history, telling the story of his life in art.  A Southern California native born in 1945, in 1967 Hardy completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in printmaking at the San Francisco Art Institute. In 2000, that school awarded him an honorary doctorate degree. He began tattooing in 1966 and developed the fine art potential of the medium with emphasis on its Asian heritage, frequently studying and working in Japan. Hardy no longer tattoos but focuses on painting, printmaking, and porcelain. With his son Douglas, he still operates the San Francisco studio Tattoo City.   Hardy has curated several exhibitions in museum and nonprofit spaces as well as showing his own works. Since 1982 he and his wife, Francesca Passalacqua, have written and published over thirty books on ... Read More »

Top Six Father’s Day Gifts on sale from TAM

Gift Guide

Look no further for the a perfect and unique Father’s Day gift for the tattoo enthusiast Dad in your life. Chris Treviño – Gods and Warriors ON SALE NOW — SAVE 60% — This is a fitting title for Chris Trevino’s first book. His tattoos often depict themes of ancient war and hidden images in his full body work. Chris is a master of Japanese tattooing and this book has more than 200 pages of backpieces, body-suits on tri-fold pages, and some amazing art. Plus an intro by Ed Hardy– Great coffee table book or perfect for your waiting area. Shop Now               Old Timers TRADITIONAL Set: A collection of the most popular issues of TAM SAVE 50% and Get lost of in the works of old masters in the days before tattoos were mainstream. Study the techniques of artists like Mike Malone, Pinky Yun, Bob Roberts, Dave Gibson, Thom DeVita, jack rudy, Chuck Eldridge, Scott Sterling, Hanky Panky, Tony Polito, Eric Inksmith, and more! Shop Now   Original Art and Sketches From the TAM Memorabilia Collection! For the exclusive and discerning collector, our selection of one of a kind, original works is a fine addition to anyone’s tattoo art collection. See original art, flash, stencils and photos from legendary artists including: Sailor Jerry, Mike Malone, Ed Hardy, Pinky Yun, and MORE. Shop Now Tattoo Culture Magazines The perfect gift for new tattoo fans. Tattoo Culture Magazine is a digital magazine available for immediate download. Create ... Read More »

3 Day Ed Hardy Event at Kings Avenue Tattoo


From Kings Avenue Tattoo: We are honored and humbled to host the legendary tattooer and artist Ed Hardy for an unprecedented 3-day event.  Hardy, renowned for his genre changing, globally influenced tattoo designs, announced that he will host “Pictures of the Gone World,” taking place May 15th, 16th & 17th at Kings Avenue Tattoo.  The event will consist of a three-day exhibition of Hardy’s most recent artwork, accompanied by the release of a New York- centric tattoo history book and a series of talks covering his influential, six-decade career. “Ed is a pioneer of tattooing, and we are making history with this event,” says Kings Avenue owner Mike Rubendall. Hardy will present a collection of his current and past artwork, consisting of mixed-media paintings that incorporate American an Japanese tattoo motifs, and “kiddie flash” – traditional maritime-inspired designs that he drew as a tattoo-obsessed child in the late 1950s, rendered with colored pencil on looseleaf notebook paper-which has never been publicly exhibited. The event marks the release of the Lew The Jew Alberts: Early 20th Century Tattoo Drawings, a compilation of designs attributed to Lew Alberts, a Newark, NJ native who tattooed under the famed Bowery-based artist Charlie Wagner. It’s the most recent title from Hardy Marks, the publishing imprint that Hardy co-founded in 1982, specializing in tattoo history and alternative art.  A limited number of books will be available for purchase at Kings Avenue, and Hardy will be signing copies on May 15th. Hardy will also stage two talks.  ... Read More »

Chris Trevino- Top Japanese Style tattooists! pt5

Chris Trevino and Ed Hardy

Chris Trevino is an expert in traditional Japanese tattooing who earned the nickname “Horimana” after studying for five years under the legendary master Horiyoshi III. His elaborate, full-body representations of Asian symbology reminds us of the later works by Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins aka Horismoku. Trevino now runs Perfection Tattoo in Austin, TX which was founded by Bob Moreau in the late 70s… The shop attracts people from every continent seeking to receive the gift of his artwork. His clients are usually serious about their tattoos, often committing to large scale projects that cover much of their body. Trevino knows how to communicate with individuals to draw out and refine an initially loose idea of what they want. He fully understands the iconography of Japanese art and explains how a seemingly simple warrior tattoo can represent far more than meets the eye based on the stories behind the character. His in-depth bio can be found in Tattoo Artist Magazine #11 and a full retrospective of his artwork and tattoos can found in his latest book “Gods & Warriors – Horimana: The Works of Chris Trevino” Horimana is his Japanese tattooer name, given him by Horiyoshi III, but he’s more commonly known as Chris Trevino, aka the workaholic, aka the Cyborg, aka THE MACHINE: Here’s why!- by Crash Hailing from Austin, TX, Chris Trevino was already well-known in the early 90s for his cutting edge tattoo skills and flash designs. This was the start of the ‘new-school’ movement of tattooing and ... Read More »

Painted ladies: why women get tattoos

Elise Harrison: 'My dad is old-fashioned: he thinks all tattooed people are prostitutes or criminals.' Photograph: Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou/Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou

Introduction by Jenn Ashworth Why are so many women getting tattoos?  Eight women reveal the appeal of permanent markings.  Photographs by Christina Theisen and Eleni Stefanou. The first tattoo I ever saw belonged to my grandad. He had it done in Scotland during his national service in the 50s, so the tattoo must have been more than 30 years old when I became fascinated by it. I used to ask him to roll up his shirtsleeve and I would use my finger to follow the outline of a woman cheekily reclining in a margarita glass. The shading that was supposed to indicate the flirty curl of the woman’s toes had become a faded, bluish blur. Now and again, he’d wink and say it was a picture of my granny. She would purse her lips in pretend disapproval. My grandad died over 15 years ago and I’d have to look at a photograph to remember the details of his face, but I can always remember that tattoo. I was raised in a religious household where tattoos were verboten; the body was a temple and women even hesitated over piercing their ears. Modesty in all things was required, especially for girls, and a flash of colour on the skin was a desecration of a holy vessel made in God’s image. So I went and had my first tattoo done when I was 16. I was out on my own for the first time, throwing myself headlong into making my mark, and letting the world mark ... Read More »



Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World MARCH 8 – SEPTEMBER 14, 2014 Source: About the Exhibition Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World explores the artistry of traditional Japanese tattoos along with its rich history and influence on modern tattoo practices in this groundbreaking photographic exhibition. As Japanese tattoos have moved into the mainstream, the artistry and legacy of Japanese tattooing remain both enigmatic and misunderstood. Often copied by practitioners and aficionados in the West without regard to its rich history, symbolism, or tradition, the art form is commonly reduced to a visual or exotic caricature. Conversely, mainstream Japanese culture still dismisses the subject itself as underground, associating it more with some of its clientele than with the artists practicing it. Both of these mindsets ignore the vast artistry and rich history of the practice. Although tattooing is largely seen as an underground activity in Japan, Japanese tattoo artists have pursued their passions, applied their skills, and have risen to become internationally acclaimed artists. Through the endurance and dedication of these tattoo artists, Japanese tattooing has also persevered and is now internationally renowned for its artistry, lineage, historical symbolism, and skill. Curated by Takahiro Kitamura and photographed and designed by Kip Fulbeck, Perseverance is a groundbreaking exhibition and the first of its kind. Perseverance will explore Japanese tattooing as an art form by acknowledging its roots in ukiyo-e prints. This exhibition will also examine current practices and offshoots of Japanese tattooing in the U.S. and Japan. Perseverance features the work of seven internationally acclaimed tattoo artists, Horitaka, Horitomo, Chris Horishiki Brand, Miyazo, Shige, Junii, ... Read More »



By Indigo del Castillo Sculptor Jessica Harrison has forever changed how we see Victorian-era ceramic figures with her works involving ladies in fancy dresses sporting badass tattoos or their own blood and guts. In this exclusive interview, she talks more about her roots as an artist and her unique take on ceramics. [read our original posts about her sculptures here and here] How did you discover your passion for sculpture? When I was little I wanted to work in animation – there were quite a few great children’s tv programs on in the 80’s that were made with 3D models and I decided quite early on it looked like the best job in the world to mess around with clay all day. Let’s talk about your grotesque ceramic ladies with severed heads and misplaced body parts. Where did you get the inspiration for this collection? What was the message you were trying to convey here? That series is called ‘Broken’ as the pieces are made using found ceramics that I have quite literally taken a hammer and chisel to.They present an impossibly fair-skinned ‘perfect’ woman and my attraction to these works was precisely because of this image they portray of the female body – my aim was to counter it and present its opposite within itself. This was simple to do, by breaking apart the hollow cast pieces and ‘revealing’ the interior, a standard formula in Western knowledge for making discoveries about the body. The female interior is a ... Read More »

The Art of the Machine Charity Show

To Benefit the Children’s Burn Foundation I am proud to announce the first annual “The Art of the Machine,” a charity event to be held July 11th 2014 in Downtown Long Beach at the Mai Tai Bar at the historic Long Beach Pike from 6pm – 2am. The Art of the Machine will be a celebration of the Tattoo Machine with Custom Tattoo Machines to be auctioned off to Tattoo Artists as well as pieces by world renowned artists available to the public. The Children’s Burn Foundation is the only known foundation that offers the Full Recovery Program for child burn survivors, locally, nationally, and internationally – a unique blend of medical care, psycho-social support services, and daily living support to help young burn survivors achieve their full potential. The complex interplay of physical and psychological trauma resulting from severe burn injuries can profoundly affect the lives of children for years to come. Through the Foundation‘s full range of programs and services, young burn survivors receive new hope, a community of supporters who understand, and a chance at a full recovery. Program services include: Medical Care & Support for Physical Recovery Family Emergency Assistance Camps & Retreats for Child Burn Survivors and Families Teen Support Group: Young Adult Burn Survivors & Supporters (Y.A.B.S.S.) Child & Family Support Groups The night will begin at 6pm with a silent auction closing at 10pm and then followed up with live music and some special surprises until 2am. There will be a special program ... Read More »

How much does a full sleeve tattoo cost?

By Kevin Miller If you have visible tattoos, chances are that someone has asked about how much their idea cost, how much they cost you, or the worst – how much they paid. Well, this article is for those people who are curious. The article specifically talks about a sleeve, but it applies to any tattoo really. Huge props to Dave Tedder for taking the time to answer this on Quora… Tattoos: How much does a full sleeve tattoo (from wrist to shoulder) cost? Your question almost has the same answer as “How much is a sackful of groceries.?” It really depends on where you make your purchase and what’s in the sack, or sleeve. Purchasing a tattoo is the same as making any other investment into art. Sometimes you can find an incredible artist at very reasonable rates and sometimes you can buy a polished turd for tourist prices. Many people spend far too much on sleeves or other large scale tattoos that they will forever remain unhappy with by starting out with the exact same question you have. “How much?” Because with that mentality the next logical move once you receive an answer is to look for it somewhere else for less. Price shopping for tattoos usually leaves you in a subpar artist’s chair receiving subpar art and tattoo services. Then what do you have? A sleeve that you’re unhappy with. After a few years of looking at other sleeves that are far better most people choose ... Read More »

Himalayan High: Tattooing in the Shadow of Everest


By Kiri Westby When I first heard there was a tattoo convention in Kathmandu, Nepal I was astounded! I lived in Nepal as a college student, worked there as a human rights activist during the recent civil war and have spent a lot of time studying Nepali language and culture. I also married a tattoo artist seven years ago and have been on a crash course of American tattoo culture ever since.  Nowhere in my mind did the tattoo scene that I had come to know and the traditional culture of Nepal mix.  But there it was, website and all, and I was instantly fascinated. My friend Eric Inksmith, a veteran of American tattooing, challenged me to take him to Kathmandu, having never really left the U.S. before. Like a butterfly suddenly wondering about the storms it’s own wings have produced, Eric was curious to follow the trail that he himself had blazed.  I was honored to be enlisted for the job and to have the chance to experience alongside him what tattooing on the other side of the world has become. At almost 70 years old, Eric recalled stories from the National Convention in Philadelphia more than 30 years ago. As I listened to tales of rival biker gangs fighting on convention room floors and people being thrown from hotel room windows, I tried to imagine how the kind, soft-spoken, Nepali people have embraced and come to celebrate tattooing. And not in a subtle, underground way either, the convention ... Read More »

Pretty Vacant: The Graphic Language of Punk


Saturday, January 25th – Saturday, March 15th The Galleries at Moore, Philadelphia, PA Source: FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF EXHIBITION-RELATED PROGRAMS, CLICK HERE A survey of the extraordinary diversity of punk and post-punk graphic design, Pretty Vacant: The Graphic Language of Punk features several hundred posters, flyers, fanzines, handbills, record sleeves and other graphic ephemera from the collection of Andrew Krivine. Emerging in the mid-1970s, punk was truly popular culture on the margins, with new ideas germinating out of a sense of urgency and seemingly random aesthetic collisions. Before it became commercially commodified into a simplified mishmash of safety pins, mohawks and anarchy symbols, punk was as much about its wide range of visual signifiers at it was a kind of music. A do-it-yourself approach and a loathing of commercial slickness were key hallmarks of the punk attitude, informing not just the music, but also the explosion of graphic design that accompanied it. Taking cues from a wealth of influences ranging from Dadaism to the Situationist International to pulp fiction, and communicating the themes of nihilism, black humor and reappropriation, the visual language of punk was a pastiche of imagery that reflected the consciousness and anti-aesthetic of a new counterculture. Featuring several hundred works on loan from New York-based collector Andrew Krivine, the exhibition includes iconic works by some of the most illustrious graphic artists of the period, including Barney Bubbles, Malcolm Garrett, Raymond Pettibon, Jamie Reid, Peter Saville, Linder Sterling, Gee Vaucher and Arturo Vega, as well as pieces created by the hands of talented, yet anonymous, artists. Beyond the ‘holy trinity’ ... Read More »

Shenpa II

By Nick Baxter Here’s a process sequence for a tiny diptych painting I did a few months ago related to the recurring theme in my work of healing wounds.  This tiny little pair will be included in the forthcoming art catalogue Pint Size Paintings Volume 2, which compiles these small paintings completed by members of the worldwide tattoo community, and features them in a traveling art show. I wrote about the Tibetan Buddhist symbolism surrounding my use of the hook symbol last year, after completing Shenpa I (which now resides in the collection of the amazing and prolific figurative painter Shawn Barber!). Read More »



An Exhibition of the Contemporary Art + Collectible Design Celebrate the World’s First Large-Scale Exhibition Dedicated to Designer Toys at the Design exchange.  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – TORONTO, Canada – February 7, 2014 – Design Exchange (DX), Canada’s Design Museum, is proud to present a series of firsts with its playful, unprecedented exhibition This Is Not A Toy, guest curated by music and fashion mogul Pharrell Williams. The first major original programming produced by DX. The first foray into museum curation for cultural connector Williams. The first time coveted artists, Brooklyn’s KAWS and Japan’s Takashi Murakami, have shown their work in a design museum. Dedicated to exploring the conceptual toy – a form made solely as an expression of an aesthetic or idea – as a fine art and design object, as well as a contemporary cultural signifier, This Is Not A Toy marks the first time these vibrant collectible sculptures, figures and paintings have collectively been on display in a museum setting. Read More »

#Sobaone Monster


By Bj Johnson The meaning behind the madness… I have been making things my entire life. I was never a conscious choice, it simply flowed naturally and automatically from my skills, my interests and my passion. For me, creating is innate.  I cannot not create. I finally made a career of my art in 1997 when I began tattooing. Tattooing is creative and experiential, but I found I still needed to build tangible things as well, so I soon gravitated to investigating the mechanics of building tattoo machines. Creating custom tattoo machines from scratch was wildly fulfilling, and naturally I wanted to set my work apart from others. To do this, I turned to other forms of metal art. I took a couple jewelry making classes at GVSU and was introduced to the metalsmithing craft.  I became addicted to this new medium immediately.  However the constraints of tattoo machine mechanics would not allow for exploration of all these wonderful tricks and techniques the metalsmithing world offered, so I began making little sculptures. These small scale sculptures were simply physical forms based on ideas and emotions I had, but I never went in any specific direction with them.  It was just playing. I have also always loved symbolism.  Wanting my work to have deeper meaning and layers, I began researching.  All the paintings of the old masters are rife with symbolism.  Each element in their paintings was there for a reason.  I loved this and began to search for ways to include ... Read More »



Cyber Monday!!!!! Check out the AMAZING deals we are offering for Cyber Monday! All issues $5.99 off Gods & Warriors: The Works of Chris Treviño: $69.99 TAM Volume 1 Book: $39.99 TAM Subscriptions: $36.00 Read More »

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