The Official Blog for Tattoo Artist Magazine

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Three German Students Surprise a Homeless Guy

This has nothing to do with tattoos, and everything to do with humanity.  I just really like it and wanted to share…

What have you done to touch someone’s life lately?

Nicki


P E R S E V E R A N C E

Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World

MARCH 8 – SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

Source: http://www.janm.org

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About the Exhibition

Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World explores the artistry of traditional Japanese tattoos along with its rich history and influence on modern tattoo practices in this groundbreaking photographic exhibition.

As Japanese tattoos have moved into the mainstream, the artistry and legacy of Japanese tattooing remain both enigmatic and misunderstood. Often copied by practitioners and aficionados in the West without regard to its rich history, symbolism, or tradition, the art form is commonly reduced to a visual or exotic caricature. Conversely, mainstream Japanese culture still dismisses the subject itself as underground, associating it more with some of its clientele than with the artists practicing it. Both of these mindsets ignore the vast artistry and rich history of the practice.

Although tattooing is largely seen as an underground activity in Japan, Japanese tattoo artists have pursued their passions, applied their skills, and have risen to become internationally acclaimed artists. Through the endurance and dedication of these tattoo artists, Japanese tattooing has also persevered and is now internationally renowned for its artistry, lineage, historical symbolism, and skill.

Curated by Takahiro Kitamura and photographed and designed by Kip FulbeckPerseverance is a groundbreaking exhibition and the first of its kind. Perseverance will explore Japanese tattooing as an art form by acknowledging its roots in ukiyo-e prints. This exhibition will also examine current practices and offshoots of Japanese tattooing in the U.S. and Japan.

Perseverance features the work of seven internationally acclaimed tattoo artists, HoritakaHoritomoChris Horishiki BrandMiyazoShigeJunii, and Yokohama Horiken, along with tattoo works by selected others. Through the display of a variety of photographs, including life-sized pictures of full body tattoos, these artists will cover a broad spectrum of the current world of Japanese tattooing.

Premier Sponsor

Mariko Gordon and Hugh Cosman

Patron Sponsors

Friends
LS Tattoo Museum
Pasadena Art Alliance
UCSB Academic Senate
UCSB Department of Art

Supporters
The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles
Los Angeles County Arts Commission
Richard Ross
Samy’s Camera
Spoonflower, Inc.
Target
Atsuhiko and Ina Goodwin Tateuchi Foundation

Media Sponsor
The Rafu Shimpo


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What Makes Tattoos Permanent?

Claudia Aguirre

TED-Ed


CONTAMINATED TATTOO INK, NEEDLES RECALLED

By Mark Fisher

http://www.daytondailynews.com

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Multiple lots of tattoo inks and needles sold by a California-based company through the Internet have been recalled due to potential bacterial contamination, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Monday.

The voluntary recall by White & Blue Lion Inc. includes all tattoo inks, needles and kits distributed by the company. The products are sold separately by 8Decades and White & Blue Lion through http://www.amazon.com.

The recalled needles and inks may cause bacterial infection and can lead to sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection, FDA officials warned. FDA laboratory testing found microbial bacterial contamination in both the inks and needles, agency officials said. There has been one illness connected with the tattoo products.

Jeremy McGrady, a tattoo artist at Cloak and Dagger Tattoo Studio in Dayton, said the company named in the recall is not a prominent supplier of tattoo ink and needles to the industry.

“I’ve never heard of it, and I’m familiar with most of the large companies,” McGrady said. “I suspect the only people who would be impacted by this are those making the poor decision to get tattooed at their own home.”

The products recalled by White & Blue Lion include a tattoo kit of a multi-colored Chinese Dragon Image with black and white lettering with Lot No. OR20036, Batch #8, in a 5-ml bottle. Some of the recalled tattoo needles are packaged in groups of five and labeled as “CE0197 Pre-made tattoo needle.”

Consumers can call the California company for more information at (626) 586-3485 from noon to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday EST, FDA officials said.


How Rinsecup Cleanup Came About

By Dan Mcnab

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I’m a tattoo artist in the city of Huntington Beach, Ca. I own and work at The Tattoo Gallery with four of my very close friends. After years and years of leaking trash bags, I decided one day to put an end to it once and for all and created RinseCup CleanUp.

When I designed this product I made sure it is the best that exists and can not get any better. Also, it’s non-toxic because our trash gets put into landfills and that would only hurt the environment. I believe as a whole, us humans do enough of that! Disposing of our rinse cups and ink caps this way is the safest method and eliminates cross-contamination in our trade due to the contaminated liquids we produce.

Once in the landfill, RinseCup CleanUp slowly releases the water and improves soil conditions through aeration. It’s less expensive than using paper towels and safer than dumping it down a sink. When that method is used more toxic chemicals are needed to clean the area it was dumped in, which leads to poisoning our environment even more.

Now we are in many countries and the response is amazing. So much support from this trade! The only advertising I have done is thru IG. It’s spreading like wildfire and I’m excited to see where it goes from here. It’s only been about 6 months since I released it for sale!

For more information about Rinsecup Cleanup, email:
Rinsecup@yahoo.com


Your Bed is Your New Tattoo’s Worst Enemy!

By Durb

 

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Having tattooed for the last 25 years, I’ve seen my fair share of tattoos that have healed badly due to the client simply sleeping in their bed. Usually these tattoos have incurred most of the damage, infection and hard healing from when the client sleeps with their fresh, new tattoo with unseen dangerous elements lurking in their bed. Sleeping is definitely one of the greatest moments during a new tattoo collector’s day to do the most damage to their new artwork. When people sleep, they are for the most part completely unaware of pain or minor discomforts, allowing them to be completely unaware of their new tattoo sticking to sheets, seeping onto the sheets and exposing their skin to possible other irritations to the new tattoo. Some of the most common issues while sleeping with a new tattoo is simply sticking to bedsheets, but it’s what’s on those bedsheets that matters during the healing process.

Sleep has a profound effect on our mental, emotional and physical well being! Sleep is the time the body can undergo repair and detoxification, although it can also be a determining factor in healing up well or not so well. Poor sleep patterns are linked to poor health and slow healing. Those who sleep less than six hours a night have a shorter life expectancy than those who sleep longer and naturally tend to heal slower. Getting enough sleep can also help resist infection, as some studies of healthy young adults have shown that moderate amounts of sleep deprivation reduce the levels of white blood cells which form part of the body’s defense system, preventing the tattoo from healing quickly.

There are many dangers to a new tattoo that your bed presents nightly. On average, most people don’t wash their bed sheets and pillows often enough, providing the perfect environment for dead skin cells to breed, potential infection or cellulitis to begin in a fresh tattoo. Another aspect is that most people don’t consistently shower or wash their hair before they go to bed, possibly having sweat or having been exposed to multiple situations during the day. People also can have their pets or animals sleeping next to them every night which undoubtedly brings animal fur, dander and the often overlooked feces that are on animal paws from the ground or backyard in general, which is simply horrible news for a fresh tattoo. Animal fur and dander can cause cellulitis which in worse than just a mild infection. Dander is an informal term for a material shed from the body of humans and animals, similar to dandruff. It is composed of skin cells which can be a major cause of allergies and skin infections in humans. Cellulitis is a common skin infection that happens when bacteria spread through the skin to deeper tissues. It is caused by bacteria, most often strep or staph and a cellulitis infected area will be warm, red, swollen, and tender and usually needs extra attention and antibiotics to help the tattoo heal properly. Animal and human dander are typically the biggest problems with cellulitis or skin infections in fresh tattoos.

Some tips to help avoid an infection in your new tattoo while sleeping in your bed is to first be sure to wash your sheets before you get any new tattoo. Always wash your tattoo off before bed and immediately when you awake, this will help eliminate any infectious materials that you’ve collected on your skin throughout the day before resting for 6-8 hours. Covering your new tattoo with a breathable, non-stick wrapping right before you lay down is an excellent way to help prevent infection from the beginning, it not only protects your new tattoo from sticking to your clothing or bed sheets, it also creates a barrier between you and your bed and helps keep potentially dangerous elements in the bed off of the new tattoo while the pores in the new tattoo seal up and stop seeping plasma. Remember to always wash the tattoo off and allow it dry with no lotion, etc before wrapping it at night. Wearing a protective piece of loose, breathable clothing also helps create another barrier between your new tattoo and infectious bed elements. Be sure to sleep on the non-tattooed side of your body, A pillow works great to adjust and hold your body part in a position that’s comfortable. Try to keep the body part somewhat elevated above the heart to reduce pressure and swelling on the new tattoo. Always wake up, remove wrapping and wash immediately with anti-bacterial foam wash when you wake up.

The most crucial time for a tattoo to begin the healing process is within the first five days, these are the days when a new tattoo is at the highest risk for an infection from everyday situations. After the first few days of wrapping or being very clean and safe while sleeping with your new tattoo, you can go about your normal routine of antibacterial soap, bactine, non-scented lotions or ointments depending on how you normally heal your tattoos. I personally like to mist my new tattoo with Bactine, it helps the body to heal while it’s trying to do two things. One is to fight any oncoming infection, the second thing is to simply heal and repair the tissue. The Bactine simply reduces your bodies need to dedicate white blood cells to fight infection and allows it to focus more on actually healing. Remember, the first days of how you take care of your new tattoo will determine the healing process and ultimately it’s final look!

 


CALAVERA X ARTIST KIM SAIGH SWIMWEAR TO BENEFIT KEEP A BREAST

By Kailee Bradstreet

http://business.transworld.net/150141/news/calavera-x-artist-kim-saigh-swimwear-benefit-keep-breast/

Calavera x Kim Saigh x Keep A Breast

On Tuesday June 3, surf inspired swimwear label Calavera will show their support for young women from all walks of life by launching a limited edition tattoo print swimwear collection, designed by renowned artist Kim Saigh of television show LA Ink. For each suit sold, 50% of proceeds will be donated to The Keep A Breast Foundation in an effort to raise substantial funds to support the foundation’s educational recourses and community outreach.

eigQ9Rzqt3cZJa1Z6FEHuPMS7gk0wakbD5IGhSUT2gA-600x600Two styles of the limited edition print will be available online at Urban Outfitter in the retailer’s fitness and outdoor apparel division, as well as Without Walls, and the Calavera website. To launch the collection, Calavera will host a cocktail event and film screening at creative design agency space, Nouvelle Vague (701 Venice Boulevard, Venice, CA) on Tuesday, June 3rd, from 6pm to 8pm.

The campaign focuses on the concept that “every woman’s body is a work of art,” and to relay that idea, Calavera has created a short video filmed by renowned photographer Alberto Guglielmi portraying the story behind the limited edition tulip print.

PRESS RELEASE – Venice, California, Tuesday May 20, 2014 — Surf-inspired women’s active swimwear brand Calavera is set to launch a collection of limited edition tattoo print suits, designed by renowned artist Kim Saigh of television series LA Ink. For each suit sold, 50% of profits will directly benefit the Keep A Breast Foundation, supporting their mission of breast cancer eradication by educating young people about prevention, early detection, and cancer-causing toxins.

In order to support Keep A Breast, Calavera Founder Anna Jerstrom recruited the talents of renowned tattoo artist Kim Saigh; the result is a feminine and iconic floral print, inspired by the significance of this charitable partnership. In the lead up to the launch, Anna showed her commitment and passion for the program, by having Kim Saigh tattoo the signature print on her torso.

The pink, black and grey tulip motif will be available in two styles; Calavera’s best selling “Siren” bikini top (USD $65) and the one-piece “Leotard” suit (USD $126). From June 3rd, both styles will be available for sale online via the Urban Outfitter’s fitness and outdoor apparel division, Without Walls (withoutwalls.com) and the Calavera website (calaveraswimwear.com).

“Regardless of size, shape or scars, every woman’s body is a work of art. My hope is that women will wear these swimsuits with a sense of empowerment, beauty and strength,” says Calavera Founder Anna Jerstrom.

Calavera also joined forces with renowned photographer Alberto Guglielmi, to produce a short film that visually portrays the story behind the limited edition print; from being tattooed on Calavera’s founder, being body painted on to the chest cast of a breast cancer survivor, and finally being created into a one-piece swimsuit, worn by actress and avid surfer Tanna Frederick. Professional longboarder and esteemed photographer, Kassia Meador concludes the video with an important message reading, “every woman’s body is a work of art.”

About the launch event: To launch the collection, Calavera will host a cocktail event and film screening at creative design agency space, Nouvelle Vague (701 Venice Boulevard, Venice, CA) on Tuesday, June 3rd, from 6pm to 8pm. Limited edition temporary tattoos of the Kim Saigh print will be applied to guests and the short video produced by Alberto Guglielmi screened for the first time. A customized piece of breast cast art, molded from the survivor featured in the video (casted by Shaney Jo Darden and painted by Kim Saigh) will be available via silent auction. Breast cast art is an ongoing initiative developed by Keep A Breast; taking formation plaster casts of women’s chests, and developing them into customized works of art. DJ MisterG will be playing the night’s tunes, while refreshments will be supplied by Vita Coco and Bon Affair spritzers. A “Cirque Du Soleil” aerial performer Sarah Moser will welcome guests, performing tricks in the Calavera leotard suit.

This is the latest in an ongoing collaboration between Calavera and Keep A Breast. In September 2013, Calavera hosted a “Surfing for Survivors” event at Santa Monica beach, throughout which Keep A Breast cancer survivors took to the waves, with the same vigour and bravery they used to manage their illness.

Shaney Jo Darden, KAB Founder says of the partnership, “Calavera and The Keep A Breast Foundation are two innately aligned brands, brought together by their similar missions to inspire and support young women. I hope this tattoo print suit will be worn as a reminder for women to stay active, get educated, and be empowered.”

About Calavera:

Started by Swedish investment banker-turned-surf obsessed swimwear designer Anna Jerstrom, Calavera is a technically driven, stylish triumph. Built for riding Kauai’s curls, beachside yoga in Bali, sunning in Santorini and everything in between, these bathing suits don’t budge. In creating Calavera, Jerstrom has applied design innovations to fill a large gap in the marketplace: performance swimwear for women that can handle the most rigorous environments yet is feminine and flattering enough for the most relaxed. For more information please visit the Calavera website, Facebook and Pinterest.

About Keep A Breast:

The Keep A Breast Foundation™ is the leading youth-focused, global, nonprofit breast cancer organization, with mission is to eradicate breast cancer for future generations. Keep A Breast provide support programs for young people impacted by cancer and educate people about prevention, early detection, and cancer-causing toxins in our everyday environment. For more information about Keep A Breast please visit the website, Facebook, and Twitter.

About Kim Saigh:

Kim Saigh is an American tattoo artist and TV personality. She has been tattooing professionally for over 16 years and is best known for her work as a featured tattoo artist on the TLC reality show, LA Ink. Kim previously owned tattoo shop Cherry Bomb Tattoo Studio in Chicago before appearing on the show and now currently works at Memoir Tattoo in Los Angeles.

About Nouvelle Vague:

The launch event will be held at Nouvelle Vague, a unique creative talent agency with 25 years of experience in photography, motion and illustration. Recognized by the Sony World Awards and the International Photography Awards, the agency remains at the top of its league. For more information about Nouvelle Vague please visit the website and Instagram.


No Pain, No Gain, as Tattoo Regret Fueling Laser Removals

By Jason Gale

http://www.bloomberg.com

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Jimmy McManus slides up his shorts and points a laser at his inked thigh to show how he can blast off unwanted tattoos.

The part-time electrician began offering the service at Chapel Tattoo in Melbourne eight months ago to address a byproduct of the global body art boom: tattoo regret. Removing the skin designs has become a roaring trade, with one in seven people expressing misgivings — some enough to spend thousands of dollars for several searing laser sessions.

‘It’s a painful reminder to choose your tattoos a bit more carefully,’’ McManus, 30, says of the procedure he’s just demonstrated on his leg.

Chapel Tattoo isn’t the only studio to begin offering to undo its handiwork, entering a new line of business as ultrahigh-powered lasers pioneered by dermatologists make the procedure safer and more bearable. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery estimates its practitioner-members did about 96,000 removal procedures last year, 52 percent more than in 2012.

“Tattoo removal is big business,” said Andrew Timming, an associate professor at the University of St Andrews’ school of management in Scotland. Tattoo parlors doubling as removal shops are “a brilliant business model because it creates its own demand.”

It also drives growth in laser devices. Revenue from sales of aesthetic equipment by publicly traded companies expanded 20 percent annually from 2009 to 2012 and is now worth about $1.25 billion, according to Cutera Inc. (CUTR), a supplier of laser and light-based medical devices from Brisbane, California. Israel’s Syneron Medical Ltd. (FDG) says it’s the industry leader, with 28 percent of the global market.

More Ink

One in five U.S. adults has a tattoo, according to a 2012 online survey of 2,016 Americans by the Harris Poll. That’s up from 16 percent in 2008. Many may end up changing their mind. Thirty-seven percent of people with inked skin regretted it after about 14 years, according to a survey of 580 people in the U.K. published in a letter to the British Journal of Dermatology last December.
(more…)


Woman’s journey to beat breast cancer ends with nipple tattoos

By Victoria Hansen

vhansen@abcnews4.com

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MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — It’s been five years since Sharon Dempsey took the shower that changed her life. She bent down to pick up a razor and immediately felt it, a lump beneath her breasts.

“My tumor was right under where they pull it up so it never made it on to the mammogram screen,” said Dempsey.

She quickly called her doctor.

“I said, ‘Dr. Scott, I felt something I’ve never felt it before. It doesn’t move.’ I went in to see him on Monday and by Friday I was already lined up for surgery,” Dempsey said.

The moment is still vivid as she makes what she hopes is her last doctor visit.

“I’ve always before I’ve had any of my procedures, I do research about it and there’s not a lot of research out there on how they do the tattooing,” she said.

At 55, Sharon is about to get her first tattoo — make that two tattoos.

“I wasn’t nervous until my son told me it was going to hurt, and then yes I was nervous,” she said.

Dempsey lives in Irmo, but has come to The Center for Natural Breast Reconstruction in Mount Pleasant to have most of her work done. Here, Dr. James Craigie took fat from her belly to build new breasts

“Tummy tuck and like the ladies at work say, I’ve got 18 year old boobs,” said Dempsey.

 

But that’s not all. Dr. Craigie even managed to create natural looking nipples from Sharon’s own skin.

“Well, we take the skin that is there and we turn the skin on itself,” said Dr. Craigie. “And we fold it up and we actually make the nipple from that skin.”

The nub of skin certainly looks like a nipple, only it lacks texture and color. There is no areola, just pale skin.

That is where medically trained tattoo artist Kimberly Kay comes in. She greets Dempsey for this final appointment, walking her through every detail.

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“I will mark you in the area that will be the size of the tattoo, and then we’ll do color matching against your chest,” she said.

Together, Dempsey and Kay decide the size and shape of her new nipples. They use stick ons to trace.

The next decision is color.

“She said normally your areola matches your lips and that is why she wanted me to remove my lipstick so that she could match it,” said Dempsey.

Like an artist, Kay pops open small pots of color — pink, beige and brown in so many shades.

“She basically takes a little pot and she just starts mixing the color and then she puts splotches on your skin,” said Dempsey.

Once the perfect combination is created, Kay cranks up the tattoo needle, but not before giving Sharon a little numbing medication. Dempsey does have some sensation still in her chest.

“She does a basket weave when she does the tattooing. She goes this way and then she goes this way,” said Dempsey.

“There are different techniques,” said Kay. “It’s not exactly drawing. We have to actually put it into scar tissue.”

Kay pushes the tattoo needle hard, but Dempsey doesn’t flinch. She’s been through so much more.

“I’m just thankful that I’m here,” she said.

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Kimberly finishes with some contrasting colors for a more realistic look.

“I’m going to spot do just brown and actually just do a brown ring around the base of the nipple to create the shadow effect,” Kay said.

She hands Dempsey a mirror and the reaction is immediate: “I look normal again, I mean it looks normal to me again.”

Dempsey will no longer have to be reminded daily of what cancer has cost. Her new tattoos cover the physical scars that will eventually heal. Mentally, she’s ready to move on.

“Well my tattoos are symbolic. My tattoos symbolize that’s the end,” said Dempsey.

“I made it. It’s over, yeah. I did it.”

http://www.abcnews4.com/story/25497833/womans-journey-to-beat-breast-cancer-ends-with-nipple-tattoos?hpt=us_bn8&autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=10153637


What is Art? (Part 2)

By Nick Baxter

Last year I started collecting my thoughts on the continual debate in my head about what art is, and how it can be (among other things) an effective form of communication. That effort was and still is intertwined with the process of further understanding my own art, and all other art, as well. In hindsight, I thought the initial writing (here and here) was a bit unfocused, and since it was also incomplete, I took the time recently to revisit those blog entries and rework them into a more cohesive essay.
The final part of that essay, as mentioned in the second of those prior blog posts, is about my belief that photojournalism can be viewed as a creative art form, possessing an almost-accidental form of raw beauty capable of inspiring other works of art (such as many of my own). This critique of photojournalism introduces broader questions about the “unintended” as art, and–for now–completes my investigation into the sneakily complicated debate “What is art?”

In the future I’ll post the final version of the essay in its entirety, but for now here is the “part 2″ continuation of those prior blog posts.

Photojournalism and the Unintended as Art

In the last 100 years, photojournalism has become a fixture of our visual landscape. On the surface, it’s simply defined as the use of images to tell a news story or to report on current events. In this role, the photos are not art, and their photographers are not acting as artists, which means their images are typically held to strict ethical standards of honesty, impartiality, and objectivity. But these attributes are graded on a scale that becomes increasingly inexact amidst the complexity of postmodern thought and the digital age of endless reproduction and re-appropriation. This is the point at which the question “What is art?” becomes relevant and fascinating to me, when applied to the medium of photojournalism.
I’ve always appreciated the naïve purity of an image that’s been produced with no pretense of art, utterly uninhibited by the finicky shackles of artistic rules or the whims of unreliable muses like inspiration. In this open and wild space, artistic qualities and natural beauty are given the chance to emerge on their own, unintended and raw, like the strongest of weeds in a perfectly manicured lawn, and photography seems to be an ideal medium for this phenomenon. This element of chance can produce quite powerful images, capable of communicating intensely to the viewer while remaining—and precisely because they remain—firmly grounded in the truth of reality “as it happened.”
And so the commonplace photos we’re bombarded with through ever-increasing media saturation begin ostensibly as visual data comprised only of ‘facts’ or neutral information, yet end up loaded with symbolism, embedded with the perceptions and beliefs of their creators and audience after becoming the subject of this artistic line of inquiry.

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One of my all-time favorites (sorry I could not find the photographer or credit online).

In studying art history, it seems this afterlife of the journalistic image became much more possible in the wake of the Dada movement, when artists (including photographers) carved out new niches for their work beyond mere decoration or commemoration of important people or places. Art in the 20th century became increasingly deconstructivist, philosophically charged, and conceptual in nature, filling multiple roles while having its meaning manipulated by the increasingly complex worldviews of both creator and audience1.

Because of this evolution, just about anything could be considered art in the right context, meaning that most contemporary art now resides as much in the blurry, ambiguous realm of provocative ideas as it does in the realm of traditional craft. Hence a museum visitor might encounter an exhibit of random paint splotches that, beneath its completely underwhelming, childlike appearance, contains a metaphor referencing complex political or psychological theories learned by the artist through years of intense academic study.

 

This can be maddening to the viewer who simply wants to marvel at a skillfully executed object of beauty, or it can be liberating for those who want to engage in debate, controversy, or social change through the arts. My own art has always attempted to straddle this fence by incorporating the best of both worlds: technical, precise handling of paint in the realism tradition, yet depicting modern subject matter and informed by the angst and alienation of postmodern philosophies. It is my belief that photojournalism in the modern age, thanks to that 20th-century process of expansion and deconstruction, straddles a similar fence, one separating objective observations from subjective beauty and meaning.

This ability of the journalistic photograph to transcend genres is confirmed in the academic community by the fact that “Breaking News Photography” is a Pulitzer Prize category. This prestigious yearly award started in 1917 as a way to honor impactful achievements in American journalism, literature, and music. Winning photographs are resurrected as art objects, receiving appreciation for their poignancy and beauty—a second life of sorts, after their initial purpose or function in the journalistic media has been served.

This second life also takes the form of photo essays, curated and arranged into cohesive narratives, which are now commonly presented in art and lifestyle publications, fine art galleries, and museums throughout the world. Depending on the intentions of the photographer and exhibiting institution or publication, as well as the sensibilities of the viewing audience, these photographs may be appreciated for their communication about the world events that comprise their content, or for their artistic qualities—or both.

In his 1995 essay about the modern age of photojournalism, writer Richard Lacayo wades into the debate surrounding artistic subjectivity and meaning:

“Photojournalists tend to stay aloof from talk about camera aesthetics. There is something about dodging gunfire in Beirut that discourages ruminations on style, understandably enough. More to the point, no one who catalogs bloodshed or poverty wants to be thought of as yet another vendor to the senses. Some news photographers spend half their lives chasing wars; who can blame them if they reach for the door when they hear the word art? …The stereotype survives: artists have visions; journalists have assignments. They may both think to themselves, ‘I am a camera,’ but each means something different.

“Yet aesthetic questions have a moral dimension. Color is pretty; misery is not. How does one keep the simple appeal of color from confounding the full range of meanings a photograph may convey? If pictures of genocide come to us in the muted pastels of a GAP ad or the vivid hues of a rock video, how does a photographer keep atrocity from looking palatable?”2

While the moralist in me sympathizes with this sentiment, the artist and rebel in me, raised in an age of cynicism, desensitization, and ambiguity, views adjectives like ‘palatable’ as mere subjective opinions, impossible to resolve into an absolute truth for all to agree on. Human culture is so diverse that practically anything could be considered palatable art, by someone. And so I answer Lacayo’s question with another question: “Why should the photographer keep atrocity from looking palatable?”

I want to ask this question not because I enjoy atrocity, but because I am capable of the postmodern complexity of holding multiple feelings and competing appreciations within me simultaneously. In this case, that multiplicity includes the horror and revulsion at the tragic events occurring in our world as well as the aesthetic delight at the spectacle of color, shape, line, emotion, symbolism, and meaning on vivid display, emerging somewhat accidentally (and perhaps with more purity) through the photojournalistic medium.

As if to concede this very point I’m making and pay homage to the “What is art?” debate, the author goes on to admit, “The most capable photojournalists…have learned to incorporate the unruliness of color into a deliberate statement. …Barbaric rule can operate in the broadest daylight, suffering can happen in sensual settings, a place can be cruel and inviting at the same time.”

And so we see that through the inescapable conduit of subjectivity, passive observation becomes intentional communication, and thus, photojournalism can also be the highest of art forms, loaded with inspiration for artists working in any medium. I’ve always appreciated the best journalistic photography for this transcendent ability, the point at which the happenings of this world become awe-inspiring images, and the deepest truths contained in the human condition are put on poetic display.

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Various newspaper and magazine clippings I’ve save over the years for reference and inspiration.

So once and for all, “What is art?” This question may never be fully answered. But with an integral approach and an open mind, artists and viewers alike can use this line of inquiry to enrich their experience of reality, to deepen the communication that is the purpose of all art, and to find beauty everywhere, even where it may be unintended.

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Another powerful, poetic image (sorry I couldn’t find the photographer or image credit online for this one either).

1The Situationists of the 1960s took this evolution to the extreme, espousing radical anarchist views on art that embraced destruction and merciless re-appropriation of all imagery, in the service of transforming society and conscious reality into a powerful and playful dialogue with the present moment.

2Lacayo, Richard. “IV: Resurgence 1980-1995.” Eyewitness: 150 Years of Photojournalism. New York CIty: Time, 1995. 166. Print.


How Tattoo Machines Could be Key to Treating Disfiguring Facial Sores and Even Curing Skin Cancer

By Tom Blackwell 

http://www.news.nationalpost.com

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo machine can target Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle.

Mention tattooing and health in the same sentence, and chances are the topic is one of the nasty infectious diseases — from HIV to Hep C — that can be transmitted by dirty needles.

A new Canadian study, though, may be about to change that image, suggesting that tattooing equipment could actually be an effective new way to combat an array of skin conditions, penetrating deep enough to deliver drugs to the right cells, but not so far that the needle prods sensitive nerves.

“It’s logical that it works…. But we were amazed”

The just-published research found evidence that tattooing could greatly improve treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a parasite that leaves millions of people worldwide with disfiguring, and often emotionally devastating, facial sores. It affects mainly developing countries, but even Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan have contracted the illness.

The technology, though, could eventually have application in treating skin cancer, psoriasis and other ailments, speculates the scientist behind the project.

Sand-Fly Skin Disease Besets Afghanistan

An Afghan receives treatment for a tropical skin disease. The Afghan capital, Kabul, has one of the highest concentrations of the disfiguring skin disease, Cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a parasitic disease transmitted by the phlebotomine sand fly. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 104492714

“We were extremely excited, very surprised [at the success of the experiment],” said Anny Fortin, a biochemist who did the work at McGill University. “If you think about it, it’s logical that it works.… But we were amazed.”

She cautioned that the initial study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, was conducted on mice, so there is no guarantee the results will translate into humans. The next step is further drug-tattooing work on pigs, whose skin is closer to that of people, and then to try the technique on humans if the animal research is successful.

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo artist works on a tattoo.

Ms. Fortin said she came up with the idea after talking to a colleague who works for a company that makes tattooing equipment for applying permanent makeup. She obtained funding to explore the novel idea from Grand Challenges Canada — a federally funded agency that finances research on affordable innovations to attack health threats in poor countries.

Leishmaniasis, it turns out, is ripe for some kind of new approach. Caused by a parasite that sand flies transmit, the most dangerous form attacks internal organs and can be fatal.

The more common cutaneous version will not kill, but leaves patients with stigma-inducing ulcers on their faces, sometimes making it difficult for them to find a spouse or otherwise affecting their lives deeply. An estimated 1.5 million new cases are recorded yearly.

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None of the current treatment options are ideal. One drug can be administered systemically, but the intramuscular injections — one a day for a month — are toxic and painful. Hypodermics are also used to deliver the same drug directly into the lesion, also extremely painful.

“I’ve seen children being treated, six people were needed to immobilize the child and this little kid was screaming like crazy,” said Ms. Fortin.

The tattooing machine targets Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle. Ironically, it acts in much the same way as the fly injects the parasite when it bites someone, said Ms. Fortin.

Her study compared treatment of ulcers in mice using the tattooing gear, versus the intramuscular injections, and a topical ointment applied on the ulcer. The tattoo method was the most effective in all cases, clearing up the lesions completely, the study reported.

It is possible the heat generated by the tattooing also helps, triggering inflammation that brings immune cells to attack the pathogen, said Prof. Uzonna.

Ms. Fortin said she is now trying to obtain another round of Grand Challenges funding, which would require her to find matching grants from other sources.


TATTOO HISTORY MYTHS EXPOSED

By Marisa Kakoulas

Source: http://www.needlesandsins.com

tattoo history myths

Last week, Gizmodo, which is primarily a tech blog, attempted to condense tattoo history, from mummies to Miami Ink, in their blog post “How the Art of Tattoo Has Colored World History.” In what seemed to be research primarily conducted on Wikipedia, the author ended up perpetuating many of the myths and misinformation that float around online.  So I hit up true experts in the field of tattoo history to set the record straight: Dr. Matt LodderDr. Anna Felicity Friedman, and Dr. Lars Krutak.

So, you can take a minute and read the Gizmodo article first. Or not.

I first asked Anna what she thought were some glaring mistakes in the post. Here’s what she said:

ANNA:  By the third sentence of this “article” I knew it was going to be a doozy. The problem with this statement, “That tradition continues today, just with a much smaller chance of infection” is a) it’s incredibly melodramatic and b) it’s just not true. Many (if not most?) traditional tattoo practitioners were acutely aware of the possibility of infection, one of the reasons why we perhaps see suspension mediums in traditional tattoo “ink” recipes like alium juice or even one of my favorite rare ones, human breastmilk, both of which contain natural antibacterial agents. Rest periods for people having undergone tattooing are common cross-culturally (presumably to let the body heal and lessen the chance of infection). And with the rise of “tattoo parties” and so much home-tattooing by amateurs untrained in proper safe practices with bloodborne pathogens, there is a huge risk of all sorts of infections in the contemporary era.

Re: the image of the “Pict” “tattoos”: had the writer just done a tiny bit of searching re: this image, he might have realized this image is a fantasy and does not represent tattoos. Scholars are still not sure if the descriptions of body art on the Picts were tattoos or just body painting (leaning toward the latter), but they definitely were not 16th century French-inspired floral designs in multi-color (they were described as woad-like, which is blueish in color). The image is also not attributed to the source, and I’m guessing when the owner (Yale University) finds out it’s been used without attribution, they will have it pulled.  Here are some links to some of my posts on one of the other images from the same book (John White’s equally fantastic Pict images), which mention fantasy and have more elucidation of some of these problems: Image 1 (below), Image 2, and Image 3.

tattooed Pict

Matt also noted the misinformation on Picts and cited “The Pictish Tattoo: Origins of a Myth” by Richard Dibon-Smith for reference.

As for the “These days, it’s not just sailors and ruffians that get inked” line (and the whole paragraph really), read Matt’s attack on tattoo cliches.

lars krutak kalinga

Above: Lars Krutak with one of the last tattooed Kalinga warriors Jaime Alos outside of Tabuk, Philippines.

I’m also grateful for the extensive critique of the article that Lars offered:

LARS: Otzi is not the oldest evidence as this article seems to purport. The oldest is a 7000-year-old male mummy of the Chinchorro culture of South America and this man wears a tattooed mustache on his upper-lip, so the earliest evidence is cosmetic. [Actually, the cited Smithsonian article had several glaring errors and I never cite it - period! - even though I work at the Smithsonian! Dr. Fletcher stated that Otzi is the oldest tattoo evidence, but she is no doubt incorrect and I like mythbusting this oft-stated "fact."]

Gizmodo: The Inuit, for example, have been tattooing themselves in the name of beauty and a peaceful afterlife since at least the 13th century.

LARS – The earliest evidence of tattooing in all of North America is a Palaeo-Eskimo ivory maskette from Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada whose face is completely covered with tattoos and it dates to -3500 BP. This object most likely represents a woman. So the practice is much older than the author presumes. For “beauty” is pretty much horseshit – see my comments below. Much circumpolar tattooing aimed to repel the advances of disease-bearing evil spirits and there were multiple forms of medicinal tattooing to relieve painful rheumatism (a la the Iceman), painful swellings, facial paralysis, and even to increase the production of a woman’s breast milk.

Gizmodo: Similarly, in the the [sic] Cree tribe, men would often tattoo their entire bodies while the women would wear ornate designs running from mid-torso to pelvis as protective wards for a safe pregnancy.

LARS: I have never heard anything about safe pregnancies in relation to Cree tattoo, although I am aware of tattoos in other parts of North America to promote fertility or ensure that the first thing a newborn saw was a thing of beauty (eg, inner thigh tattoo, Inuit region). Indeed, Cree men (Plains Cree, Wood Cree) were tattooed on their torso, but only for war honors. These tattoos had to be earned so only successful warriors would have worn such tattoos. The author makes it sounds like every man had them, but this is simply not true.

To read this full article, go to: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/03/tattoo-history-myths-exposed.html


Shenpa II

By Nick Baxter

http://www.nbaxter.com

Here’s a process sequence for a tiny diptych painting I did a few months ago related to the recurring theme in my work of healing wounds.

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Tinted panel with drawing, color block-in, building detail, adding final glazes and highlights, and finished painting.

 This tiny little pair will be included in the forthcoming art catalogue Pint Size Paintings Volume 2, which compiles these small paintings completed by members of the worldwide tattoo community, and features them in a traveling art show.

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Shenpa II )Toward Healing), oil on panels, 4 x 3 inches (diptych), 2013

wrote about the Tibetan Buddhist symbolism surrounding my use of the hook symbol last year, after completing Shenpa I (which now resides in the collection of the amazing and prolific figurative painter Shawn Barber!).

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Shenpa (Toward Healing), oil on panel, 11 x 14 inches, 2013


Surgeon Takes Pains to Preserve Tattoos When He Fixes Spines

By Mitch Dudek

Source: http://www.suntimes.com

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Dr. Tyler Koski, 40, a surgeon and co-director of the Northwestern Medicine Spine Center talks about how he takes extra time in the operating room to preserve the tattoos of patients affected by surgery. | Mitch Dudek/Sun-Times

Occasionally mixed among the family photos on Dr. Tyler Koski’s cellphone are pictures of back tattoos.

Koski, a surgeon, takes pains to preserve patients’ tattoos when he fixes their spines.

He’ll slice the inked skin, spend hours tinkering with a spine, and then study the picture the way someone working on a jigsaw puzzle looks at the box.

“It’s easy if the tattoo is letters or words, but when it’s a picture, it gets trickier,” said Koski, 40, co-director of the Northwestern Medicine Spine Center.

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Rob Crane, 48, had scoliosis and wore a back brace during much of his childhood growing up in Rogers Park. He was able to avoid surgery by staying in shape. But 15 months ago, the pain became too severe, and he underwent surgery to straighten his spine. His surgeon, Dr. Tyler Koski, took care to preserve the tattoo on his back. | Mitch Dudek/Sun-Times

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Rob Crane, a partner in Napleton’s Northwestern auto dealership, shows off the tattoo on his back, which Dr. Tyler Koski carefully preserved after fixing Crane’s spine. Asked if he had worried about the tattoo before the surgery, Crane said he was more worried about whether he’d be able to walk again. | Photo courtesy of Rob Crane



After concentrating for hours while standing on their feet, many surgeons will use staples — a quicker, easier option and less tattoo-friendly way to close a wound.

But Koski will spend an extra 45 minutes carefully stitching tattooed skin, even if a patient tells him not to “worry about making my tattoo look good.”

“It’s an art form like anything else. And people are proud of them and they are meant to be permanent,” said Koski, who doesn’t have any tattoos.
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Stick And Poke Tattoo Kits

Marisa Kakoulas

http://www.needlesandsins.com

stick and poke tattoo kit.jpg

Hand-poked tattoos are experiencing a Renaissance, with stellar professional tattooers reviving the ancient methods of body adornment. Employing techniques passed down from generations, much of hand tattooing comes with strict tradition and sacred rituals. The question is should it come in a box?

When SF tattooist Shannon Archuleta sent me the link to the Stick & Poke Tattoo Kit, we both said that our initial reaction was Oooh nooo. Then there’s the rationalization reaction: people have always been sticking and poking themselves, so they might as well be safe. This rationalization is how the kit is touted.

However, upon further reading of the site — particularly the “Open letter to the precious tattoo artist” on the blog portion — the disdain for the craft, the hygiene 101 info and bad advice on what to do with the dirty needles, and also the goal of putting the kits in stores around the world, well, it made Shannon and I revert to our original reaction: this is not a good thing.

To read more of this article, go to: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/01/stick-and-poke-tattoo-kits.html


Nipple Tattoos and their Michelangelo

By Katy Watson

Source: BBC News, Baltimore: http://www.bbc.co.uk

Vinnie Myers has helped thousands of women recovering from breast cancer by painting tattoos for women who have lost their nipples to surgery.

A tattooist in Baltimore has built up a huge customer base because of his unusual specialty – tattooing nipples on to women who have suffered from cancer and had their breasts removed.

There is something very familiar about the suburbs of small towns across America.

The roads are big and distances long, but sooner or later you are guaranteed to come across a strip mall – a little open air shopping complex along the side of a main road.

And so there I was, 20 minutes outside Baltimore, parked outside one of these strip malls.

This one had a 24-hour pharmacy as well as a veterinary surgery, a hairdresser’s, a tanning shop and a tattoo parlour – Little Vinnie’s Tattoos, to be precise, and it was Little Vinnie I had come to meet.

He was a friendly man dressed in a tweed waistcoat, a striped shirt and a smart felt hat. Vinnie shook our hands, welcomed us in and showed us around his business.

The walls were covered in tattoo art with catalogues lined up at the back of the room, packed with thousands of designs to choose from.

A classic heart with a dagger through the middle, perhaps? Or maybe your favourite cartoon character or – if you are feeling patriotic – you could choose from a bald eagle or the American flag.

Little Vinnie's tattoo parlour

A few customers were sitting on the benches, waiting to go in one of the six studios along the side of the wall, each with a black crushed velvet curtain for a door.

But one studio on the other side of the room stood out. It had more of a structure to it and a wooden door, much like an office or a doctor’s surgery.

Rather appropriate really, because although Vinnie has no medical training, he has become a bit of a star in the medical world.

He no longer spends his day tattooing anchors on men’s biceps. In fact, most of his clients are women and they have one thing in common, they are all recovering from breast cancer.

A few years ago, a doctor in Baltimore asked Vinnie to help out with a patient who had had breast reconstruction, leaving her with no nipples.

So realistic were his skills in creating 3D nipple tattoos, patients started demanding him over doctors who typically carry out basic tattoos as the final stage of reconstruction.

Now, he says, it has taken over his life. Vinnie sees up to 1,400 patients a year and travels across the country and beyond.

To prove it, there is a map in his studio with pins in it, showing where people come from – he has clients in countries as far away as Saudi Arabia, no mean feat in a part of the world where tattoos are considered haram, or forbidden.

Map of the US

When I was visiting, Sarah had just finished her appointment and was beaming.

Sarah is in her mid-30s and last year was devastated to find out she had cancer – just a few months after being told she was pregnant.

Within a month of giving birth to her son, she had to have an operation to remove both her breasts. She describes the first time she took off her bandages as the hardest day of her life.

“Every time you go and take a shower you see these scars that are a permanent reminder of what you just went through,” she says.

But now she can smile.

“I have other tattoos but I never thought I would be getting my nipples done.” It is certainly a conversation starter, she jokes.

A self-confessed bad boy who learned his trade while in the army, Vinnie says there are a million people who need this done, but just a handful of people doing it.

Little Vinnie's tattoo parlour

He was even asked to fly to the United Arab Emirates recently because there were about 20 women who wanted his tattoos – but only three of their husbands would give them permission, so he could not go.

Such is his reputation, he is affectionately nicknamed “the Michelangelo of nipple tattoos”. But Vinnie plays down his talents – he says his work is not artistically challenging.

In fact, he got fed up a few years ago and decided to stop. He said enough was enough and he wanted to get back to regular tattoos.

But then one day a woman called him up to ask for an appointment. He said “No” and she sounded very upset.

Then out of the blue his sister called, telling him she had breast cancer too. It was a sign, he says, that he had to continue with this work.

“You lose the artistic satisfaction but then you gain this other satisfaction that is incredible,” he says. “I was not prepared for how it was going to make me feel.”


Color Tattoos Saved In France

By Marisa Kakoulas

Source: http://www.needlesandsins.com

tattoo inks

Photo by Edgar Hoill.

As a happy update to our post on the French Health Ministry’s attempted ban of most colored inks, the association of professional tattooers in France, Tatouage & Partage, received a letter from health officials stating that the proposed ban was “malentendu” — a misunderstanding. You can find a copy of the letter here.

According to the AFP:

“The ban was “misinterpreted” by the government offices in charge of implementing it, he said, expressing relief on behalf of France’s 3,500 to 4,000 professional tattoo artists. […]

The tattoo artists’ association said the problem was one of the four tables printed in the government decree announcing the ban, which listed the dyes allowed in cosmetic products…”

To read the rest of this article, go to: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2013/12/color-tattoo-saved-in-france.html


3 Step Tattoo Healing Regimen from Pride Aftercare by TATSoul

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As a tattoo artist, it’s also important to protect your work from the fading and discoloration that can affect tattoos if they’re not properly treated. Although it’s not possible to make sure your clients are consistent with their aftercare routine, you can suggest the right products that will heal and protect your artwork that they wear.

Pride Aftercare by TATSoul has a three step system to cleanse, heal and protect new tattoos. The cleanser, ointment and lotion are specially formulated with natural ingredients to work together for best results.

The latest addition in Pride Aftercare’s system is the Tattoo Ointment. Pride Aftercare Tattoo Ointment is specifically formulated to heal tattoos so you can be assured that the gentle ingredients will in no way affect the new ink. Unlike other ointments, Pride Aftercare’s oil remains intact, allowing for better consistency and protection (see below).

pride_ointment_strip

 Pride Aftercare’s Tattoo Ointment contains no dyes or fragrances and is approved by tattoo professionals and skin care specialists for its moisturizing and anti-aging ingredients. It may also be used to treat minor skin irritations.

Whether it’s your own tattoo or a piece you’ve just completed, make sure to treat it with the Pride Aftercare system to cleanse, heal and protect your new tattoo. Keep your work remaining vibrant for years to come.

Learn more:

Pride Aftercare’s Website: www.prideaftercare.com

Pride Aftercare’s Instagram: @prideaftercare

Pride Aftercare’s Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/prideaftercare

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Tattoo for the Philippines

By Marisa Kakoulas

Reblogged from: http://www.needlesandsins.comtattoo for the philippines

Last week, I wrote, with a heavy heart, about how the tattoo community lost one of our own, Agit Sustento, in the devastating typhoon in the Philippines. And, as a true community, artists and collectors from around the world are joining Tattoo for the Philippines, and raising funds to be donated to the Red Cross relief efforts in the country. Find a list of participating artists here — and more are artists are welcome to be a part of it.

Elle Festin of Spiritual Journey Tattoo & Tribal Gallery (shown tattooing by hand below) offers more on the design he created for this fundraiser:

“The inspiration for the tattoo design comes from an artifact known as the Manunggul Jar. The artifact was discovered in a burial site Manunggal Cave in Lipuun Point, Quezon, Palawan. It was chosen as the inspiration for the design because the figures represent guides taking the deceased to the next life, in essence guiding the souls of those who died. The artist’s interpretation of the design is in the style of a petroglyph. This style was chosen as a nod to the indigenous cultures of the Philippines. The design also incorporates a dedication to Jonas Agit Sustento, a tattoo artist and musician from Tacloban, who perished in the typhoon along with several members of his family.”

The cost of the tattoo is $30.00 U.S. or $20.00 Euros. The costs of supplies will be borne by the tattoo artists who are also dedicating their time.

Find more info on Facebook.

tattoo for the Philippines 2


Beautiful Mastectomy Scar Tattoo

By Marisa Kakoulas

Reblogged from: http://www.needlesandsins.com

mastectomy scar tattoo bra

Tattooing’s transformative magic is none more evident than on the fierce women whose battle scars with cancer are morphed into beautiful works of art.  We’ve gotten many messages since our P.Ink Day post, in which we wrote about how the P.Ink or Personal Ink Project brought ten tattooists and ten cancer survivors together to create exceptional tattoos over mastectomy scars.  So grateful to all of you for your inspirational stories.

One kickass woman, Sheri, has allowed us to share her exceptional story. Her “bra” tattoo, shown above, is by Shane Wallin of Twilight Tattoo in Minneapolis, MN. Alli from Twilight wrote:

“We saw your blog and it’s great. We reposted it to our Facebook page along with some photos of one of Shane Wallin’s recently finished tattoos on a wonderful woman name Sheri. Two weeks after getting her tattoo finished, she found out her cancer returned after years of being breast cancer free and it is terminal. She told me she was so excited to “bring her sexy back” with her new tattoo and those two weeks were the happiest she has been in years since being diagnosed and her mastectomy.  It was both heart warming and breaking all at the same time. Reading your blog and seeing those other images of work that other women have gotten reminded us of Sheri and I just wanted to share the images with you. Sheri asked that we put her photos out there and raise awareness, however we can, so I want to honor her in that.”

Thank you, Sheri and the Twilight Tattoo crew, for the inspiration.

 

Similar Article:
MASTECTOMY SCARS TRANSFORMED ON P.INK DAY:

http://wp.me/p14cQJ-5hv

 


Tattoo Culture Issue 4: AVAILABLE NOW!!!

TCM Issue 4 available now!!

Paul Booth, Miss Arianna, Dong Dong, Tattoo Archive, Tattoo History, Debra Yarian, Sean Herman, Needles and Sins, Pep Williams, Bro Safari, Artist Galleries and more…

Available in the app store here:
For all other devices:
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P.INK DAY 2013

By Marisa Kakoulas

Reblogged from: www.needlesandsins.com

P.Ink Day

In March, we wrote about the Personal Ink Project or P.INK, which is an incredible resource that offers tattoo inspiration, ideas and info for breast cancer survivors. It also is a place where these women can research and perhaps even connect with skilled artists who can transform mastectomy scars into beautiful works of art.

On October 21, 2013, that connection will be made when 10 tattoo artists will tattoo scar-coverage or nipple-replacement tattoos on 10 breast cancer survivors at Saved Tattoo in Brooklyn, NY.

You can help make this event happen by being a part of the crowd-funded project for as little as $10. There are also tons of perks for those who can give more. For $50, there’s digital swag and temp tattoos. For $500, you get an art print of one of the tattoos you helpedg fund.

And the art is guaranteed to be stellar considering the line-up:

I’ve had the pleasure of working with the P.INK team, in a small way, on this event. P.INK is a “nights-and-weekends passion project” of a handful of employees at the Boulder-based ad agency CP+B who had been affected by cancer. Their goal is to see this project expand, including more P.INK Days should this first event be a success.

If you can’t contribute, spread the word by sharing this page and using #PinkTattooDay. You can follow P.INK on Twitter and on Facebook.

Learn more about the project from the video below.


Invocation Of Trust

By Nick Baxter

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Invocation Of Trust, oil on panel, 4.5 x 8 inches, 2013

Here’s a recent piece I completed for submission to an upcoming charity art exhibit at The Egan Gallery in Fullerton, California, curated by friend and fellow artist Cody Raiza who is a passionate animal welfare activist.
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Ben Spangler

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By Molly Kitamura

Reblogged from: http://knivesandneedlesblog.com/page/2/

Ben is new to the culinary industry and is heavily tattooed! Read his short interview with K&N and see whats cooking today!

M: Write a little about yourself, background, work, currently doing what
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