The Official Blog for Tattoo Artist Magazine

Machines

KURV Tips Available now from Morphix

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Morphix introduces a line of autoclavable tips (branded KURV) which are available for purchase direct from www.morphixtattoo.com or one of our authorized distributors listed on our website.  KURV Tips are available in 4 different sizes: 7M, 9M, 3/5D and 7/9D with additional sizes to be introduced in the future.

Our patent pending designs and FDA approved biocompatible, medical grade material offer the artist and client several advantages over standard metal tips.  Bright colors and whites stay pure while tattooing for a better end result, and there’s no subdermal metal flake contaminant — a side effect with metal tips.

Our designs have incorporated smooth corners/edges throughout saving additional trauma.  The KURVed mag tips allow for easier cornering, and all tips have a low profile housing for maximum visibility.

Retail price per tip is $8.50 and come with a 45-day money back guarantee for all purchases made through the website.

 


Confessions of a Tattoo Artist: Part 2


Confessions of a Tattoo Artist: Part 1


Rotary vs Coil Machines: Joe Swanson with Clinton Crider


The Art of the Machine Charity Show

To Benefit the Children’s Burn Foundation

I am proud to announce the first annual “The Art of the Machine,” a charity event to be held July 11th 2014 in Downtown Long Beach at the Mai Tai Bar at the historic Long Beach Pike from 6pm – 2am.

The Art of the Machine will be a celebration of the Tattoo Machine with Custom Tattoo Machines to be auctioned off to Tattoo Artists as well as pieces by world renowned artists available to the public.

The Children’s Burn Foundation is the only known foundation that offers the Full Recovery Program for child burn survivors, locally, nationally, and internationally – a unique blend of medical care, psycho-social support services, and daily living support to help young burn survivors achieve their full potential.

The complex interplay of physical and psychological trauma resulting from severe burn injuries can profoundly affect the lives of children for years to come. Through the Foundation‘s full range of programs and services, young burn survivors receive new hope, a community of supporters who understand, and a chance at a full recovery.

Program services include:

  • Medical Care & Support for Physical Recovery
  • Family Emergency Assistance
  • Camps & Retreats for Child Burn Survivors and Families
  • Teen Support Group: Young Adult Burn Survivors & Supporters (Y.A.B.S.S.)
  • Child & Family Support Groups

The night will begin at 6pm with a silent auction closing at 10pm and then followed up with live music and some special surprises until 2am.

There will be a special program highlighting the event, its donors, and sponsors with an article on the history of the Tattoo Machine and special cover art by Tattoo Artist Josh Duffy available to all attendees.

If anyone is interested in participating or sponsoring, please contact Casey Keener at casey@tattooartistmagazine.com. We are still accepting Machine donations as well as art for auction to benefit the charity.

Current Sponsors Include: TatSoul, Eternal Tattoo Supply, Tattoo Artist Magazine, Tattoo Culture Magazine, Sullen Art Collective. Sponsorships are still available. Check out our Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ArtoftheMachine

Machine Builders currently committed include: Tim Hendricks, Union Machine, Chris Quidgeon, Dewey Smith, Mike Schaeffer, John Boyd, Cory Rogers, Paco Rollins and Brandon Lewis.

Tattoo Artists donating art include: Josh Duffy, Tom Berg, Scott Richardson and Tokyo Hiro.

We will also have a website up in June, roughly a month before the event starts with profiles on the Machine Builders and Artists as well as specs on the donated machines. Anything that does not sell the night of the event will be available on the sites e-store after the event for purchase.

Thank you for your support and I look forward to everyone getting involved in this special night to benefit kids in need! If we don’t, who will?

Casey Keener

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Japanese Tattoos as Fine Art

By Liz Ohanesian

Source: http://www.laweekly.com

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Models show off their tattoos at the opening event for “Perseverance.”

On Saturday afternoon, four tattoo artists went to work inside Little Tokyo’s Japanese American National Museum for the opening of “Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in the Modern World.” They spent hours taking ink and needles to flesh, adding to the large, detailed illustrations that already marked their client’s bodies. Crowds gathered and dispersed throughout the day, watching with interest.

Most seemed unfazed by the buzz of tattoo machines. Many of the onlookers here have gone through a similar process. Some had tattooed sleeves that crawled out from under t-shirts. Others had art that peeked out above collar lines or below hems.

Instead, it was two of those tattoo artists working in silence at their stations who could provoke a wince from the crowd. They were practicing tebori. That’s the traditional Japanese way of applying tattoos. In other words, they were using equipment that wasn’t motorized. The artists dipped their instruments into ink before poking repeatedly at patches of skin on their clients. One lay on his back, an arm crossed over his eyes. His stomach moved with breaths that grew deeper as the prodding persisted. Another remained still on his stomach. From certain angles, you could catch the tension creases form on his face.

Tebori is an old-fashioned way of tattooing, but it’s not antiquated. Takahiro Kitamura, known as Horitaka in tattoo circles, is the curator of “Perseverance.” He notes that there are still plenty of tebori practitioners at work. Many of them choose to use machines to outline the tattoos, he says, but they’ll still use their hands for shading. It’s more than an adherence to tradition. He notes that some believe working by hand makes for a better, longer-lasting tattoo.

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“Perseverance” is an unusual show in that it both documents and celebrates the art of Japanese tattoos, as well as the impact this style of body art has had globally. Tattoos date back to Japan’s ancient history, but flourished during the Edo period. Despite an extensive history, tattoos in Japan aren’t mainstream. In fact, many who have traveled to the country have reported of signs that ban people with tattoos from certain institutions. Even in the U.S., where body art is relatively commonplace, the Japanese style is extreme in comparison to everyday tattoos. These are not your typical daisy on the ankle. Some people invest in full bodysuits. Others may stick with the trunk of the body or limbs.

According to Horitaka, one of the major misconceptions about Japanese tattoos is that they aren’t “fine art.” Tattoos have some similarities with other traditional Japanese art forms that have found homes in museums. Take the names of the artists as an example. A number of the tattoo artists here are known by names that use the prefix “hori.” Horitaka explains that this word means “to dig or carve” and notes that woodblock prints are often signed by artists whose names also begin with “hori.” It is, he says, something that tattoo artists adopted from wood carvers.

In curating this exhibition, Horitaka is challenging the misconceptions about tattoos. Artist and professor Kip Fulbeck photographed numerous human canvases bearing the work of the best artists in the field. Horitaka selected photos that zoomed in on the art, juxtaposing those with full-sized portraits of the people who wear the tattoos. The goal was to explore the diversity within the Japanese tattoo tradition, while making the show as much about the people as it is about the art. It’s a massive collaboration between the curator, the photographer/designer, the tattoo artists and their clients. For the opening day festivities, many of the clients turned up – some traveling to L.A. from Japan – to model work that can take months, even years, to complete.

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Shawn McHenry and Chad Sachman, both from Rancho Cucamonga, are both clients of Inland Empire tattoo artist Espi. They were amongst the models at the exhibition’s opening event. McHenry has a full back tattoo. It took about a year to get that done. He also has work on his leg that’s been in progress for two-and-a-half years. His tattoos tell the story of Kintaro, a folklore hero, and his encounter with a large carp. It’s a tale that relates to McHenry’s work. He owns a koi fish shop and got into the business when he was barely an adult. “If you’re foolish and blind and just want to do it,” he says of the story’s message, “you can succeed.”

Horitaka says that tattoos almost always tell a story. Those may be based in folklore, religion or history. You’ll see narratives unfold down the back, below the buttocks and onto the upper thighs. They might scroll down arms or across the chest.

As Japanese tattoos have increased in popularity, the stories they tell have changed as well. “We’re in a world of fusion now,” says Kitamura. Time-honored tales aren’t the only ones told on skin. Chris “Horishiki” Brand is an artist at Good Time Charlie’s in Anaheim. He’s also part of the L.A.-based art collective UGLAR. For this exhibition, he presented 108 Heroes of Los Angeles. It’s a retelling of Shui Hu Zhuan, a Chinese novel that later made its way to Japan, where it’s known as Suikoden. In this series of tattoos, Brand merges Japanese and Chicano art in a story of rebellion. Photos of the tattoo piece are exhibited in the museum.

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Undoubtedly, with narrative-based pieces as involved as these, getting a Japanese-style tattoo requires a serious commitment. Shawn McHenry once went through three days in a row of tattoo sessions, with each one clocking in at about 12 hours. “It got to the point where we would have to stop because of the smell of flesh,” he says.

He says that there is an endorphin rush that comes with being tattooed. That, however, can wear off when you’re in the lengthy sessions that occur with large pieces. He says that, at a certain point, the pain stays in a specific part of the body. It doesn’t move with the needle. Chad Sachman agrees with that sentiment. Last week, he had work done on his lower back, over the spine. “I was actually feeling the pain in my knee,” he says.

As for the artists, their work requires constant study. Horitaka, who owns a tattoo shop in San Jose, spent several years as an apprentice in the U.S. and another decade studying under a Japanese tattoo master. Although he works solo now, he’s not done learning. He says, “I think I’m always going to be a student of the Japanese tattoo.”


Traditional Japanese Tattooing with Chris O’Donnell


TAM #17 Interview with Frank Lee


Knives & Needles with Grime

By Molly Kitamura

http://www.knivesandneedlesblog.com

Grime, Grime, Grime. One of the best tattoo artists in the world! On the slim chance you have not heard of him, he has a shop called Skull and Sword in San Francisco. He is widely known for being a renaissance man of tattooing (and art in general!). What I mean by that is that man consistently crushes any tattoo or style of tattoo requested of him no matter what it is. Grime has created his own style in the process, one that cannot be imitated or replicated although many have tried and failed. Basically you have to see his work for yourself to understand what I am talking about and I highly recommend checking him out!

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But today that is besides the point. Today we are talking Grime and his food! Mr. Grime can also cook (…renaissance man…) and he occasionally sends me photos of his dishes. They always look amazing. The other day he sent me a particularly mouth-watering photo of his pan-fried salmon filet with an oven-roasted yam and sautéed spinach garnished with raisins, pine nuts and a balsamic glaze. That photo had me seriously second-guessing what I had already decided to cook for dinner that night. You can never go wrong with simple yet sophisticated! Check out a few great recipes and some of Grime’s tattoo work below… Cheers!

I will try my best to recreate Grime’s recipes for you all. Try this dish for your next dinner, you will love it!

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Grime’s Pan-fried Salmon Filet With Oven-roasted Yam and Sautéed Spinach

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How Tattoo Machines Could be Key to Treating Disfiguring Facial Sores and Even Curing Skin Cancer

By Tom Blackwell 

http://www.news.nationalpost.com

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo machine can target Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle.

Mention tattooing and health in the same sentence, and chances are the topic is one of the nasty infectious diseases — from HIV to Hep C — that can be transmitted by dirty needles.

A new Canadian study, though, may be about to change that image, suggesting that tattooing equipment could actually be an effective new way to combat an array of skin conditions, penetrating deep enough to deliver drugs to the right cells, but not so far that the needle prods sensitive nerves.

“It’s logical that it works…. But we were amazed”

The just-published research found evidence that tattooing could greatly improve treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a parasite that leaves millions of people worldwide with disfiguring, and often emotionally devastating, facial sores. It affects mainly developing countries, but even Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan have contracted the illness.

The technology, though, could eventually have application in treating skin cancer, psoriasis and other ailments, speculates the scientist behind the project.

Sand-Fly Skin Disease Besets Afghanistan

An Afghan receives treatment for a tropical skin disease. The Afghan capital, Kabul, has one of the highest concentrations of the disfiguring skin disease, Cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a parasitic disease transmitted by the phlebotomine sand fly. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 104492714

“We were extremely excited, very surprised [at the success of the experiment],” said Anny Fortin, a biochemist who did the work at McGill University. “If you think about it, it’s logical that it works.… But we were amazed.”

She cautioned that the initial study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, was conducted on mice, so there is no guarantee the results will translate into humans. The next step is further drug-tattooing work on pigs, whose skin is closer to that of people, and then to try the technique on humans if the animal research is successful.

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo artist works on a tattoo.

Ms. Fortin said she came up with the idea after talking to a colleague who works for a company that makes tattooing equipment for applying permanent makeup. She obtained funding to explore the novel idea from Grand Challenges Canada — a federally funded agency that finances research on affordable innovations to attack health threats in poor countries.

Leishmaniasis, it turns out, is ripe for some kind of new approach. Caused by a parasite that sand flies transmit, the most dangerous form attacks internal organs and can be fatal.

The more common cutaneous version will not kill, but leaves patients with stigma-inducing ulcers on their faces, sometimes making it difficult for them to find a spouse or otherwise affecting their lives deeply. An estimated 1.5 million new cases are recorded yearly.

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None of the current treatment options are ideal. One drug can be administered systemically, but the intramuscular injections — one a day for a month — are toxic and painful. Hypodermics are also used to deliver the same drug directly into the lesion, also extremely painful.

“I’ve seen children being treated, six people were needed to immobilize the child and this little kid was screaming like crazy,” said Ms. Fortin.

The tattooing machine targets Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle. Ironically, it acts in much the same way as the fly injects the parasite when it bites someone, said Ms. Fortin.

Her study compared treatment of ulcers in mice using the tattooing gear, versus the intramuscular injections, and a topical ointment applied on the ulcer. The tattoo method was the most effective in all cases, clearing up the lesions completely, the study reported.

It is possible the heat generated by the tattooing also helps, triggering inflammation that brings immune cells to attack the pathogen, said Prof. Uzonna.

Ms. Fortin said she is now trying to obtain another round of Grand Challenges funding, which would require her to find matching grants from other sources.


Illegal tattoo artist who used a dirty toothbrush to clean his equipment is jailed after huge Alice in Wonderland etching leaves a woman’s back covered in scars

By: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Professionals:  Thoughts on this??  Please comment…

Nicki

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  • Tony Newlands drank while working in unsanitary conditions in his kitchen
  • Court hears he used Old Spice stick deodorant to affix stencil transfer
  • Environmental health officials acted after complaint from disgruntled customer
  • She was left in agony after huge fairytale tattoo became infected
  • Newlands was jailed for four months and had £1,000 of tattoo tools seized

An unlicensed tattooist has been jailed after his botched Alice In Wonderland etching across a young woman’s back left her in agonising pain and scarred for life.

Tony Newlands worked in unsanitary conditions in the kitchen of his home in Carlisle, Cumbria, where a lack of sterilising equipment created a serious risk of infection, a court heard.

He improvised around a lack of suitable equipment by using a ‘dirty’ toothbrush to clean his tattooing tools and an Old Spice deodorant stick to apply stencil transfers to customers.

Newlands’ illegal enterprise hit the skids after an inept attempt at an Alice In Wonderland tattoo which spanned most the back of a young woman in her 20s.

After two sessions on the detailed design, the  woman was unable to bear the pain and asked him to stop. She fell sick when the etching got infected and was left with ugly scars.

At Carlisle Magistrates Court, Newlands admitted a single offence of failing to ensure his customers were not exposed to risk under health and safety law.

Clare Liddle, prosecuting for Carlisle City Council, described how Newlands’ victim contacted environmental health officials and told them that he had ‘wrecked her back’.

Neither the defendant, nor the property he was using in Ridley Road, Currock, were registered for tattoo work.

The woman revealed how she had paid up to £100 for two days of tattoo work.

‘The work was carried out in the kitchen of the property,’ said Mrs Liddle. ‘She described how during the tattoo, she sat on a kitchen stool and leant over the worktop.

‘There was a cat in the kitchen and the defendant was drinking. He also had a few cigarette breaks during the tattoo. He used an Old Spice deodorant stick to stick the transfer onto her back.

‘It’s likely that this deodorant stick was used on other customers, creating a risk of infection.’

The woman saw no cleaning equipment, though Newlands did use gloves and disposable needles, said Mrs Liddle.

After the second painful tattooing session, she added, the woman’s back became so badly infected the she could not sleep for a few days.

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Botched: The massive but ineptly drafted Alice In Wonderland tattoo – criticized by a legitimate tattoo artist as the worst he’d seen – which left this young woman scarred for life and in agony when it became infected.

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Both Donna Hastie, the environmental health officer who investigated the case, and legitimate local tattoo artist Colin Fell said the Alice in Wonderland tattoo was the worst they had seen.
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A Review on Jeff Gogue’s “tattoo as I see it”

By Nicki Kasper

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“In that moment, I realized that instead of trying to be inspired, I was going to try to inspire people.”

I recently ordered two copies of Jeff Gogue’s DVD, “tattoo as I see it”… Jeff is one of my closest and most genuine friends and I wanted to support his project, something I know he and put a lot of work, time, money, energy and heart into.  I bought a copy for myself, and one for a close friend of mine – an artist I thought could use some inspiration.  I didn’t know exactly what the DVD would be like, but I know Jeff, and I knew it would be inspiring, as well as very giving with valuable information and advice to tattooers… I just now was able to find the time to sit down and watch it, and it doesn’t disappoint.

I know Jeff in a couple different ways…  We’re friends; I know him on a personal level, and he’s fun, open, genuine, kind, generous, and hilarious. I’m also one of his clients, so I know him on that level.  I know how much he cares about his clients, about the pieces he puts on our bodies, about the pain we’re feeling, etc.  I know how much heart he puts into every single piece, and I’m grateful and fortunate to be covered in them.  But in addition to being a friend, and a client, I’ve also had the pleasure of working with him on side projects.

I know from experience that nothing Jeff Gogue does professionally or otherwise is half-assed.  He cares about the details.  If he decides he’s going to do something, he wants to give all of himself to it.  If it has his name on it, he wants it to be the absolute best he has to offer at that time and place.  He never thinks he’s reached his full potential, which is why we see his work changing and evolving over and over. I can relate to him in many ways, which I think is part of the reason we became instant friends so many years ago.

“You’re either a taker, or you’re a giver.”

He wants to inspire others, and that is the point of this movie.  It will inspire everyone who watches, artist or not.  He’s honest and open about his process, what he wants, his strengths and weaknesses.  It’s real, and humble and people can always relate to that.

If you’re an artist, you will be blown away at how generous Jeff is with information that will help you from laying out a piece to tips on using contrast in your work to mixing colors.  It’s invaluable information that he’s learned by trial and error over the years and he’s sharing it all with you. But if you’re not an artist, and you just want to be inspired about believing in yourself and making shit happen for yourself… About not accepting failure, and instead being driven by it, you need to watch this film.

To Jeff and Ryan Moon – You guys did an incredible job on this, and now I wish I hadn’t been such a chicken about being interviewed for it! I’m proud of you both!


#Sobaone Monster

By Bj Johnson

http://www.sobaone.com

http://www.workhorseirons.com

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The meaning behind the madness…

I have been making things my entire life. I was never a conscious choice, it simply flowed naturally and automatically from my skills, my interests and my passion. For me, creating is innate.  I cannot not create.

I finally made a career of my art in 1997 when I began tattooing. Tattooing is creative and experiential, but I found I still needed to build tangible things as well, so I soon gravitated to investigating the mechanics of building tattoo machines. Creating custom tattoo machines from scratch was wildly fulfilling, and naturally I wanted to set my work apart from others. To do this, I turned to other forms of metal art. I took a couple jewelry making classes at GVSU and was introduced to the metalsmithing craft.  I became addicted to this new medium immediately.  However the constraints of tattoo machine mechanics would not allow for exploration of all these wonderful tricks and techniques the metalsmithing world offered, so I began making little sculptures. These small scale sculptures were simply physical forms based on ideas and emotions I had, but I never went in any specific direction with them.  It was just playing.

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I have also always loved symbolism.  Wanting my work to have deeper meaning and layers, I began researching.  All the paintings of the old masters are rife with symbolism.  Each element in their paintings was there for a reason.  I loved this and began to search for ways to include symbolism in my own work.

All of this became a explosion of purpose when I thought of making my monster sketches into three-dimensional pieces.  Through my research I found that historically,
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DOC INK #4: Julio Casagrande

Doc Ink is a brazilian  web series of short episodes featuring some of that country’s most respected tattooers. It was introduced to us by São Paulo-based tattooer Nico Acosta. Enjoy episode #4!


Jay Brown: 28 Machine Builders Part IV of IV

By Jay Brown
As a machine builder these are some of the things I look for in a machine. And I am not saying that this is it, the gospel, this is just the way I look at it. So the other day I thought to myself, “Man, this would make a great article.” As I started listing candidates for the article I found that the list got long really fast. Thus, I decided that I would stop at 28, because it’s as good of a number as any, and it was enough for a broad spectrum of builders. So here it is, 28 tattoo great machine builders… (If I missed anyone don’t be offended, it’s nothing personal, I just had to think of space. Maybe there’ll be additions in a future article?) So without further ado here they are, starting with historical builders, because they were the pioneers and should be recognized first, (plus I’m a history buff) and then moving to present day. Again this is not a Top 10 list, just a list of great builders, hope you enjoy…

PART IV on expanded page…

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Jay Brown: 28 Machine Builders Part III of IV

By Jay Brown
As a machine builder these are some of the things I look for in a machine. And I am not saying that this is it, the gospel, this is just the way I look at it. So the other day I thought to myself, “Man, this would make a great article.” As I started listing candidates for the article I found that the list got long really fast. Thus, I decided that I would stop at 28, because it’s as good of a number as any, and it was enough for a broad spectrum of builders. So here it is, 28 tattoo great machine builders… (If I missed anyone don’t be offended, it’s nothing personal, I just had to think of space. Maybe there’ll be additions in a future article?) So without further ado here they are, starting with historical builders, because they were the pioneers and should be recognized first, (plus I’m a history buff) and then moving to present day. Again this is not a Top 10 list, just a list of great builders, hope you enjoy…

PART III on expanded page…

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Jay Brown: 28 Machine Builders Part II of IV

By Jay Brown
As a machine builder these are some of the things I look for in a machine. And I am not saying that this is it, the gospel, this is just the way I look at it. So the other day I thought to myself, “Man, this would make a great article.” As I started listing candidates for the article I found that the list got long really fast. Thus, I decided that I would stop at 28, because it’s as good of a number as any, and it was enough for a broad spectrum of builders. So here it is, 28 tattoo great machine builders… (If I missed anyone don’t be offended, it’s nothing personal, I just had to think of space. Maybe there’ll be additions in a future article?) So without further ado here they are, starting with historical builders, because they were the pioneers and should be recognized first, (plus I’m a history buff) and then moving to present day. Again this is not a Top 10 list, just a list of great builders, hope you enjoy…

PART II on expanded page…

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Jay Brown: 28 Machine Builders Part I of IV

By Jay Brown
The tattoo machine has been around for 135 years now, the first stencil pen by Thomas Edison was used by tattooers. Then in 1891 Samuel O’Reily came up with his version of the tattoo machine and then it has just evolved from there. The odd thing is, the basic concept of the machine hasn’t changed all that much since the turn of the century, and the inline electromagnetic coil type machine still reigns supreme in today’s modern world.

I am a tattoo artist of 25 years, but I am also a tattoo machine builder. In this day and age it seems like everyone is building or assembling machines, some who haven’t been tattooing long enough to know the nuances of the machine itself, yet others really understand the geometry, and workings of a machine due to years of experience tattooing.

A few years ago everyone had to have apprentices, and apprentices had apprentices, now it seems the fad is to build machines. I personally do it because I have had a passion for tattoo machines since the beginning, hacking off Supreme frames in the 90s to do it as a version of Paul Rogers’ Mad Bee or Mike Malone’s Rollo-matic. And then 10 years ago I began building machines,  starting out with some basic designs and bolt together-s in steel and aluminum, then cast brass only doing 13-20 a year. Now I work with steel, kind of gone full circle, all though I still do Jonesy replicas in cast brass. In the past few years I have made it more a full-time venture. Now I build 50-100 a year, all handmade and my designs and geometry. I really enjoy building good quality tattoo machines, and knowing that the artist using it gets to create beautiful skin art… So how do you know who a good machine builder is? (more…)


For the Record: Thomas Edison’s Muckers

Courtesy of Tattoo Archive: Another one of Thomas Edison’s stencil pens showed up for sale on Ebay recently. This device is often described as “the first electric motor driven appliance produced and sold in the US.” This is not easy to prove, but sure sounds good! Of course to the tattoo world this stencil pen is the grandfather of all electric tattooing machines. The one on Ebay was listed as “Buy it Now” for $35,000. The last time I checked there were no takers, but it got me to thinking more about the machine’s inventor and builders. Edison held at least four different US patents for his stencil pen ideas. The first was issued on August 8, 1876; this was an abbreviated version of the patent he had received one year earlier in England. Edison took some of the other ideas from the English patent, and in 1877 and 1878 got US patents for them… (more…)


Tattoo Artist Magazine Volume I Book Will Be Arriving Next Week!

We are excited to announce that Tattoo Artist Magazine Vol. I will be arriving next week from our printer!  We will begin shipping all pre-orders at the end of next week. We apologize for the extended delay and would like to thank everyone for their patience regarding this matter.

If you would like to order the book please visit our TAM Pro Store here: http://tattooartistmagazine.myshopify.com/password.

TAM Vol I. is for professional tattoo artists only.

Foil stamped cover art by Hunter Spanks.

Cheers- TEAM TAM

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Tattoo Artist Magazine Book (Issues 1-5) Pre-Order Now Available

As you may know, the first five issues of TAM have become highly sought after and sales have recently been limited to full-set orders only due to our dwindling inventory. With this in mind we created TAM Volume 1, a book that consists of issues 1-5. The response to the prototype of this book at tattoo conventions all over the world has been unanimous, “We want this book!”

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Chris Quidgeon: Bare Knuckle Irons

Chris Quidgeon started tattooing in 1994, and began building tattoo machines under the name “Bare Knuckle Irons” in 2005. He started building machines to gain a greater perspective on the tools of his trade.

Chris prides himself on making quality machines by hand, and his machines are only built by him and him alone. He only sells to professionals, and guarantees all of his machines for life to the original buyer, unless altered after purchase. [*NEW* machines added to the TAM Pro Store on expanded page]

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