The Official Blog for Tattoo Artist Magazine

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Confessions of a Tattoo Artist: Part 1


The Art of the Machine Charity Show

To Benefit the Children’s Burn Foundation

I am proud to announce the first annual “The Art of the Machine,” a charity event to be held July 11th 2014 in Downtown Long Beach at the Mai Tai Bar at the historic Long Beach Pike from 6pm – 2am.

The Art of the Machine will be a celebration of the Tattoo Machine with Custom Tattoo Machines to be auctioned off to Tattoo Artists as well as pieces by world renowned artists available to the public.

The Children’s Burn Foundation is the only known foundation that offers the Full Recovery Program for child burn survivors, locally, nationally, and internationally – a unique blend of medical care, psycho-social support services, and daily living support to help young burn survivors achieve their full potential.

The complex interplay of physical and psychological trauma resulting from severe burn injuries can profoundly affect the lives of children for years to come. Through the Foundation‘s full range of programs and services, young burn survivors receive new hope, a community of supporters who understand, and a chance at a full recovery.

Program services include:

  • Medical Care & Support for Physical Recovery
  • Family Emergency Assistance
  • Camps & Retreats for Child Burn Survivors and Families
  • Teen Support Group: Young Adult Burn Survivors & Supporters (Y.A.B.S.S.)
  • Child & Family Support Groups

The night will begin at 6pm with a silent auction closing at 10pm and then followed up with live music and some special surprises until 2am.

There will be a special program highlighting the event, its donors, and sponsors with an article on the history of the Tattoo Machine and special cover art by Tattoo Artist Josh Duffy available to all attendees.

If anyone is interested in participating or sponsoring, please contact Casey Keener at casey@tattooartistmagazine.com. We are still accepting Machine donations as well as art for auction to benefit the charity.

Current Sponsors Include: TatSoul, Eternal Tattoo Supply, Tattoo Artist Magazine, Tattoo Culture Magazine, Sullen Art Collective. Sponsorships are still available. Check out our Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ArtoftheMachine

Machine Builders currently committed include: Tim Hendricks, Union Machine, Chris Quidgeon, Dewey Smith, Mike Schaeffer, John Boyd, Cory Rogers, Paco Rollins and Brandon Lewis.

Tattoo Artists donating art include: Josh Duffy, Tom Berg, Scott Richardson and Tokyo Hiro.

We will also have a website up in June, roughly a month before the event starts with profiles on the Machine Builders and Artists as well as specs on the donated machines. Anything that does not sell the night of the event will be available on the sites e-store after the event for purchase.

Thank you for your support and I look forward to everyone getting involved in this special night to benefit kids in need! If we don’t, who will?

Casey Keener

310-502-9302


Early Stick-and-Poke Prison Tattoos Preserved In Formaldehyde

By Sara Barnes

Source: http://www.beautifuldecay.com

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The Canvases Walk in the Door: A Brooklyn Tattoo Parlor Popular with foreigners

By Carroll Gardens

Source: http://www.nytimes.com

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The owner of Smith Street Tattoo Parlor described its style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in.

The brownstone-lined streets of Carroll Gardens may not seem like much of a tourist destination. But brand Brooklyn is ascendant these days, and foreigners come to idle at farm-to-table restaurants and browse in fanciful boutiques.And farther south, where affluence gives way to aluminum siding and Smith Street dead-ends under the din of the Gowanus Expressway, visitors come for a more permanent souvenir: authentic Brooklyn ink.

On a recent Thursday, Yossy Yoshino, 35, a tattoo artist from Japan, lay face down on a massage table at Smith Street Tattoo Parlour while Dan Santoro, 31, inscribed a pig in a bikini on his back (“three tops, one for each set of teats,” Mr. Santoro explained). The words “Weird World” floated above the pig’s head.

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Mr. Yoshino, a teardrop tattoo dripping from his eye, said he had traveled thousands of miles from his home in Okinawa to get a “New York tattoo.”

Just what makes a New York tattoo can be a bit difficult to pin down. The shop’s owner, Bert Krak, 35, described the parlor’s style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in.

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For Restless Pioneer of Modern Tattoo Art, a Life Beyond Ink

By David Gonzalez

Source: http://www.nytimes.com

Visitors to the cluttered studio inside Thom DeVita’s Victorian house marvel at the artwork that covers the walls, his drawing table, even his hands. The images reflect not just his interests, but his skills, which he honed as a tattoo artist on the Lower East Side for some 30 years; a storied era to aficionados. The accomplishment was all the more remarkable because it was illegal in New York City at the time.

Nowadays, it seems everybody has a tattoo. If there is someone to thank for the art’s increased acceptance and visibility, it might be Mr. DeVita. Every month, Chris Grosso brings admirers up to visit the old master, in Newburgh, the upstate town where he has lived since leaving the Lower East Side in the early 1990s.

“He is one of the founders of modern tattooing,” said Mr. Grosso, who befriended Mr. DeVita two years ago while filming a documentary about him. “It’s not what you see on reality television, but something that only he and seven other people in the 1960s started, from purely a love for the art form. He wasn’t from a sailor or biker background, where tattooing comes with the territory. They appreciated the great Japanese masters, the people from Samoa. Thom was at the forefront of that.”

Growing up in East Harlem, the son of Italian immigrants, Mr. DeVita did not set out to be an artist. After high school, he worked at various jobs, from factory hand to messenger. He recalled how his parents used to refer to some people as “bohemians,” and how he warmed to the idea.

“It seemed like a nice life to live, being with artists,” he said. “It didn’t seem like they went to work. Then I realized when I got to the Lower East Side, I was 30 years too late to be a bohemian. But I caught the tail end of the beatnik era and the beginning of the hippie era.”

His own entree into the art world was improvised, when a potential girlfriend asked him what he did.

“I had to be something, so I told her I was an artist,” he said. “So I became an artist. I had to show her I was an artist, so I started doing some artwork.”

He decided to become a tattoo artist when the city banned tattooing in 1961 (the ban was lifted in 1997). He figured business would be good, since the law drove out his competitors, and the police on the Lower East Side had more pressing concerns than outlaw skin art.

Mr. Grosso said that Mr. DeVita created new designs incorporating nontraditional elements, such as Pueblo Indian iconography and even the rose from the Lord & Taylor shopping bag. He said he admires him for his restless creativity, even if — at 81 years of age, with hands trembling from Parkinson’s disease — he no longer does many tattoos.

Instead, Mr. DeVita resorts to rubbings, stencils and stamps, making montages of old tattoo designs on recycled wooden crates, paper, cutting boards and even ancient ledgers. He signs them with his surname, rendered in snakelike letters that would be the envy of any graffiti writer.

“He paints on everything,” Mr. Grosso said. “Maybe if he had seen graffiti he would have been a tagger. He just doesn’t stop. It has to be a compulsion.”

Mr. Grosso can understand. After making a documentary on Mr. DeVita, he set up a website to sell his work. Now he visits him monthly, to give him cash from the sales and pick up new work to ship. He is often accompanied by a friend or two who might want to learn about tattoo history firsthand, like Fernando Lions, a tattoo artist from Brooklyn who recently accompanied him on a trek.

The two young men peppered Mr. DeVita with questions, and asked to see some classic designs or snapshots from his time on the Lower East Side. Depending on his mood, he may or may not comply; pictures he had told Mr. Grasso never existed magically appeared during this visit. At one point, Mr. DeVita took out some panoramas he had painted in bold, black brush strokes.

“These are beautiful,” Mr. Lions said quietly.

“You know how they’re done?” Mr. DeVita asked. “The paper is scrap I cut off bigger pieces. I paint on them with whatever is left in the ink pot.”

Before they are sent off to customers, Mr. DeVita packs a slip that reads: “Any Imperfections Will Add to Its Beauty.” He first saw the phrase when he bought a china closet, and liked it so much he appropriated it.

“All my art is imperfection,” he said. “I dwell on imperfection. I’m constantly pulling things out of the fire.”


A Treasure Trove of Antique Tattoo Flash is Found in Corpus Christi

By Craig Hlavaty

Source: http://www.blog.chron.com

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Long before tattoos were the subject of reality show after reality show and people like Justin Bieber sported ink, tattoos were the milieu of sailors, soldiers, Marines, and maybe circus folk.

This weekend, Peveto Art Gallery will display 20 sheets of historic tattoo flash art that were recently found in an abandoned house in Corpus Christi. According to gallery owner Scott Peveto, the flash looks to be over 100 years old. The items were rescued from a Dumpster by a man who cleans out houses that are tagged to be torn down.

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“I’ve spent enough time with them to know they are real,” said Peveto. The sheets are water and nicotine-stained and more than likely were originally displayed on the walls of a tattoo shop for customers to choose pieces from.

The art is on heavy illustration board and shows  signs of wear from push pins. Artist names are included on most.

“The majority of them are by the same artist,” said Peveto. You can really pinpoint the ones that don’t quite go with the others.

Peveto is looking to sell half the lot at a public unveiling of the exhibit  Saturday night at his Montrose gallery. He said he is going to ask around $2,000 per sheet. The exhibit opens at 6 p.m.

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Peveto said the work predates the art of  Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, who made his name tattooing sailors, rebels, and rogues. Sailor Jerry’s name is now on rum bottles, art galleries, dorm posters, baby clothes, and his artwork can be found re-imagined on skin all over the world.

A friend of Peveto’s who is a longtime sailor noticed that one piece looked particularly familiar.

“He said that the one piece of flash looks very much like Teddy Roosevelt’s ‘Great White Fleet’ that circumnavigated the globe from 1907 to 1909,” said Peveto. That could mean that the artist had drawn up the design for customers who had been aboard the ships. Or it just looked cool.

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Corpus would have been a convenient spot for sailors to get tattoo work done given its proximity to the Gulf. Today, the city maintains a thriving tattoo scene with hotspots like Shipwreck Tattoo.

Bruce Morgan out at Shipwreck and his colleagues aren’t so sure the flash is the work of a homegrown Texas artist. They think it’s more of an East Coast-style. Texas tattoo flash from this era would probably have more Texicana involved, like state flag, cowboy, or yellow rose imagery, Morgan said.

“It could have been someone’s collection from their travels,” said Morgan. Even still he’s very curious about the collection’s  lineage. He’d like a fellow tattoo artist to acquire them for their own collection.

“We tattooers try our best to keep tattoo-related history in our own family,” he said.

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Nick Hooker’s Tattooed 1940s

By Anni Irish

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A recent animated film featured on Vanity Fair’s website in their “Through the Decades” series showcases artist Nick Hooker’s tattoo inspired interpretation of the 1940s. The short four minute film highlights several historical events from the 1940s and is done in an Americana tattoo style. The film opens with a shot of a vintage radio that is placed next to a bottle marked “xxx”. In the background there are various tattoo inspired images which are framed. The radio is on and we hear what seems to be a speech FDR being given in regards to World War II. Over the radio address the sound of a tattoo machine buzzes and the camera pans out to a reveal simple sign that says “tattoos”. The shot widens and various flash tattoo designs become visible and the room is transformed into a tattoo parlor. An Uncle Sam type tattoo artist is tattooing sparrows onto a patron who has a larger ship and American flag scene on their stomach and chest. The image quickly shifts again. Within this shot the framed flash tattoo designs become the object of focus. It is within the confines of the framed tattoo images where Hooker’s depiction of the 1940s comes to life.

An important element to Hooker’s representation of the 1940s is his emphasis on the history of tattooing. Hooker showcases this by making the link between tattooing and sailors as well as their presence within freak show and circus culture. Tattoo artists such as Professor Charlie Wagner, Sailor Jerry and Cap Coleman are referenced which is is important. Another key detail to Hooker’s telling of the 1940s is his foregrounding of the tattooed lady through Mae Vandermark. Vandermark a former stenographer turned tattooed lady becomes the darling of Hooker’s short film. In an “Behind the Scenes Interview” about the film, Hooker and it’s co director, Drew Christie talk about the “illustrative qualities” of tattoos. It is the “illustrative qualities’ of them that both Christie and Hooker note, which capture their interpretation of this decade. It is also interesting to note that This American Lifecontributor and author Starlee Kine, wrote and narrated the piece. This talented group of artists came together to create a compelling, alternative representation of this infamous decade.

What is significant about this animation for me is how an alternative narrative of history is told through tattoo culture. In many ways, tattoos came to encompass the 1940s. This occurred through the presence of the War and the various sailors and soldiers who documented the experience if it on their bodies to the tattooed ladies and various “freaks” of circus culture. Christie and Hooker are narrating a social history which often goes overlooked. This animation is raising larger issues surrounding the social history of tattooing within the United States while also giving insight into it. It is being done in an unconventional medium through one of the most popular publications out today. As a result, a new generation is learning about this alternative historical narrative which is incredibly important.

Given the fact that it is such a short film, only a portion of this history is being told which encompasses a larger time span. While I do not want to take away from the work that I feel this animation is doing, it is only a tiny piece in this larger social puzzle. There are many other elements that construct America’s tattoo history. People such as Margot Mifflin, Amelia Klem Osterud, and others are actively working to help recuperate this larger history but there is still much to be done. Being mindful of this wider framework and the issues “The 1940s” raises perhaps it will inspire the next generation of tattoo artists and tattoo historians to begin their own investigation. 

http://video.vanityfair.com/watch/the-decades-series-the-1940s-by-nick-hooker

**Anni Irish is a writer and researcher who holds an MA in Performance Studies from New York University and an MA in Gender and Cultural Studies from Simmons College. Her work focuses on the representation of bodies, fetishism, and the social history of tattooing in America. She currently resides in Brooklyn, NY.2015 |Candidate The Draper Program, NYU|

2013 |2013 MA Performance Studies, NYU|
2012 |2013 MA Gender/Cultural Studies, Simmons College|

|anniirish.tumblr.com


Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Closure Story

By John Niederkorn 

Reblogged from: http://tattoomuseum.wordpress.com

Since the closure of the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum (ATM) in Nov. 2012 the tattoo community, along with fans and followers of the museum have had many questions about its untimely closure.

Today the intention is to shed some light on this subject by presenting *bankruptcy documents levied against the museum’s main financer and location provider Mrs. Mary Jeannette Leonora Seret, and her private company by the name of Partners at Work BV…
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*1.7 Cause of bankruptcy

The bankrupt company is engaged in the reintegration of long-term unemployed people and people who have trouble finding labor. The orders were to do so – after tender – awarded by the municipalities or social services.

At one point, a partnership was established between Mr. Henk Schiffmacher or the foundation Amsterdam Tattoo Museum and the bankrupt company. Mr. Schiffmacher, known tattoo artist, had the desire for its collection accessible to a wide audience in a museum and for the bankrupt company was ‘ideal’ means to place multiple people from the reintegration purposes to work in this museum.

Henk Schiffmacher and Seret agreed the Schiffmacher collection would be housed at the Plantage Middenlaan 62 location. In conjunction with this agreement Seret and her Partners at Work BV company had an agreement with the Dutch government to provide employees for museum, under which its main function was to give employment to reformed criminals and “underprivileged” individuals… Due to the nature of the Seret’s company she received financial backing from the local government.

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Based on this agreement, Partners at Work BV claimed to invest 1 million Euros in the ATM…

*Housing was sought and found in the building currently in use at the Plantage Middenlaan 60-62 in Amsterdam.
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Tattoo Stories Episode 3: Jack Rudy

By Sanctioned TV.


Amsterdam Tattoo Museum: Two-Year Anniversary

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From Annemarie Beers to all the ATM followers, supporters and Blue Bone Society members,

Yesterday, two years ago we opened the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum. With help from a lot friends from all over the world we managed to start a great museum and realized Henk’s dream. Opening day and night was one to remember forever! Unfortunately we had to end this in a bad way due to our “financier’s” incompetence. We were kicked out of OUR museum on Nov. 12th 2012, Henk’s collection was kidnapped in the museum. On April 1st, 2013 the museum closed its doors…

Thanks to our dear friends, followers and tattoo fans we raised enough money to pay lawyers, get the collection back and start the Pop Up store for our staff to continue in the name of the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum.

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I hope we’ll have a new museum by 2014. All of you that contributed in any possible way, THANK YOU!!! The positive part of all this was that we realized how big our loving and supporting family is! Thank you all again… ATM FOREVER!

 

 
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All Photos by: Bobby C. Alkabes

Reblogged from: tattoomuseum.wordpress.com


New Archival Giclee Prints on TattooCultureMagazine.com

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We are now offering Giclee prints on www.TattooCultureMagazine.com. Printed and shipped to you by our friends over at Rebelreprints.com. Rebel Reprints is a fine art printing company that is owned and run by tattoo artists. So this is something to benefit everyone involved cause we are supporting within our industry, and art scene. Rebel Reprints started this to take something back from the BIG business printing companies and give you a higher quality product that someone knows about and cares what your final print looks Like. (more…)


*NEW* Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Update

atm-logoBy ATM/Blue Bone crew
The situation of the museum is still very complicated. The woman who was supposed to be our financier is bankrupt and there’s a curator now in the museum and they’re still figuring out who owns what. In the meantime we still cannot enter the museum or take the collection away. Every time they postpone the date the collection is to be released because of difficulties. However, it should last no longer than one month…  (more…)


Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Update: New Pop-Up Store Opening

atm-logoDear Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Supporters & Blue Boners,
Thanks to your support we are happy to announce the opening of a new pop-up store by the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum on the 28th of February. You’re most welcome to attend this event from 4-7 pm at the van Woustraat 78 in Amsterdam. In the shop we sell a wide range of tattoo (related) books and gifts and Henk Schiffmacher, Danny Boy, Chris Danley and Yushi Takei will be tattooing here as well. Of course we will host a bunch of great guest artists like we did in the old museum… (more…)


Paul Booth’s Last Rites Gallery Presents: Yoko d’Holbachie

INTHEDARK_WebLast Rites Gallery: What is your earliest memory of picking up a paintbrush? Tell us a little more about it.

Yoko d’Holbachie: I attended a painting class run by an American couple when I was 3 years old. I drew monsters, ghosts and snails with a shell full of eye balls often.

Last Rites Gallery: What does In the Dark mean and why did you choose it for your exhibition at Last Rites Gallery?

Yoko d’Holbachie: I loved the gallery’s space coronation for the dark art, when I visited the Last Rites Gallery. It inspired me for new painting idea that the beautifully glowing critters in the gloom. What I wanted to paint for this exhibition is actually the gleam in the dark, not the dark.

Last Rites Gallery: Please tell us a little bit more on why you paid tribute to contemporary and classical mythologies in some of your pieces? (Ayida Weddo, Hatmehit, Gorgon?)

Yoko d’Holbachie: My critters in my painting had been living inside of me. They have no name. I borrow the stories from various kind of mythologies, when I give a birth to my critters and the story suits to them. Those goddesses I like are not just having super power but also evil, angelic, humanistic, and a mother…

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Paul Booth’s Last Rites Gallery Presents: Alexandra Manukyan (VIDEO)

Last Rites Gallery’s NEW Video Interview Series brings you into the conversation with the best artists of dark surrealism…

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Paul Booth’s Last Rites Gallery Presents: Chris Haas (VIDEO)

Last Rites Gallery’s NEW Video Interview Series brings you into the conversation with the best artists of dark surrealism…

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Paul Booth’s Last Rites Gallery Presents: Sarah Joncas (VIDEO)

Last Rites Gallery’s NEW Video Interview Series brings you into the conversation with the best artists of dark surrealism…


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Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Update: New Pop-Up Gallery Location

blacklogoStatement from Henk Schiffmacher:

Patience my friends, patience…

“Patience? If I wanted any patience I would have become a fucking doctor” my old friend, Vancouver’s most notorious tattoo friend, used to say.

But nevertheless, hang in there: we are on our way. We negotiate, send letters, get mails, threats, fooled and cheated and the only reason why we keep going is to see what the heck is next. First of all, the fight is not over. The divorce, in fact…  (more…)


Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Update

blacklogoStatement from Henk Schiffmacher:

What’s up at this very moment? We still have no access to the collection. There are no artists working in the museum, and the shop is declared a no-go area for the tattoo world. A small group of big shots out of the real museum world and university are negotiating the release of the collection. But the schizo character of the opposite side makes it difficult. We have good hope and are already looking for a new location. Soon we will open up a temporary location for our merchandise and office somewhere in town. Meanwhile, your support is much appreciated and needed. Stay away the fuck away from the museum! It’s not ours anymore, it’s now in the hands of un-tattooed people!

Thanks to everybody who has been incredible generous and has been donating to our funds!

Henk Schiffmacher and crew…

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Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Winning Battle to Regain Access to Collection and Facility

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(Courtesy of The Board of the Foundation Amsterdam Tattoo Museum)

Dear Friends,

As you all know, the museum was struggling to survive. During the last weeks lots and lots of people from all over the world expressed their support. Many people, shops and companies even showed their strong commitment by giving a financial contribution to push the museum through these difficult times. The response was heartwarming! We incredibly appreciated the many thousands of messages on Instagram, Facebook, etc.

At this time, we are proud to inform you that we (partly due to the continuous pressure from the tattoo world) are in process of reaching an agreement with our business partner Partners aan het werk. We expect the contract for a three year partnership to be signed early next week…  (more…)


TAM EXCLUSIVE: Henk Schiffmacher Talks About Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Crisis (VIDEO)

What happened at the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum? Explained by Henk Schiffmacher from Amsterdam Tattoo Museum on Vimeo.

Official Statement from the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum:
Dear comrades!

First of all we are overwhelmed by the support we’re receiving from all over the world! We can’t thank you enough. Here’s a little history about the museum. What happened, and how come it is like it is now…

Henk’s been collecting tattoo related stuff for over 35 years, he knows a lot about the history and is very passionate about the legacy. Especially nowadays, when about everyone can buy a tattoo machine from the Internet and start tattooing without knowing shit…  (more…)


Dutch News Article on the Struggle Over The Amsterdam Tattoo Museum

Henk Schiffmacher May Own Tattoo Museum No Longer
(Original story from De Stentor) [Editor's Note: This story originally appears in Dutch and is loosely translated into English via Google Translate.]

Amsterdam, Nov. 22nd, 2012 – By a high sustained financial conflict Henk Schiffmacher access to its own Amsterdam Tattoo Museum denied. It has famous Dutch tattoo artist and artist Thursday…  (more…)


News: SAVE THE AMSTERDAM TATTOO MUSEUM


Official Statement from the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum:

Comrades at arms!

It is been overwhelming, we’re blown away by the enormous support we’ve had the last 24 hours. Never before in my whole history as a tattoo artist I’ve come across such an enormous exposition of positive energy. Reactions worldwide, tweets and retweets, pictures on Instagram, posts on Facebook, etc. It’s a tough fight, but we’re in to win this.

Again today we were denied access to our museum. Locks have been changed, negotiations with the police to get personal matters like tattoo machines were necessary. A tidal wave of local and national press were served all day. Negotiations with landlords, lawyers and businessmen took place. Do not despair my friend. We will fight this with success. Stay tuned!

P.S. Lawsuit is about 1.5 million Euros and has no ground at all. Come see us on December 8th. Help us fight for our art, fight for our history, fight for our future, fight for our museum!

How can you help us?
– First of all, keep spreading the word!
– Make a donation on PayPal, big or small at info@bluebonesociety.com.
– Make a tattoo for the museum, donate, take a picture and participate in the 1000 tattoos for the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum competition
– Sing a song on YouTube
– Make a “Save The ATM” t-shirt
– Bake cookies
– Throw a party
– Become a member of the Blue Bone Society
– Put us in your will
– Sell your body
– Throw us a gig
– Rob a bank
– Organize an auction
– Participate in the December 2nd worldwide Tattoos for History day in participation with www.tattooplatform.nl.

Keep up the fight!

Yours truly, Hanky Panky, Louise, Annemarie & Tessa…

Click here to donate to the SAVE THE ATM FUND!!!

More information about the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum can also be found on www.amsterdamtattoomuseum.com and their blog http://tattoomuseum.wordpress.com/.

Related TAM Blog Articles:

TAM EXCLUSIVE: Henk Schiffmacher Talks About Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Crisis (VIDEO)

Dutch News Article on the Struggle Over The Amsterdam Tattoo Museum

News: Upcoming Book Releases From The Amsterdam Tattoo Museum

Adventures in Amsterdam (Part I)

Adventures in Amsterdam (Part II)

Taki and Molly Kitamura: Amsterdam Adventure

JTG: On the Road in Amsterdam and Beyond


*NEW* Scott Harrison Paintings Available


All paintings are unframed, ink on paper unless otherwise noted, prices include domestic shipping and handling, payment can be made through PayPal or money order. E-mail me with the E-mail address at which you’d prefer to receive the PayPal money request or to reserve the painting until I receive the money order. Paintings are sold on a first e-mail, first served basis… headbandbrothers@hotmail.com (more…)


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