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*NEW* Photos Added to the Gallery

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Tattoos by Marco Tafuri www.facebook.com/marco.tafuriRead More »

TCM #5: Available NOW!

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Tattoo Culture Magazine #5 featuring Gunnar, Eric Inksmith, Shawn Barber and more is now available on the App Store at: www.tattooculturemagazine.com/app Digital edition for all other devices/computer go to: www.tattooculturemagazine.comRead More »

The Existential Anguish of the Tattoo

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By Dan Brooks Source: www.nytimes.com Somewhere between the release of “Reality Bites” and the closing of MTV’s sports bureau, my generation got tattoos. We were not the first Americans to do so, but we were the first to do it en masse. Now, two decades later, we are becoming the first to carry them into middle age. It turns out tattoos are permanent, even when little else is. Like many important signifiers of the 1990s, tattoos began as a gesture of rebellion and became so ubiquitous as to carry no stigma at all. There was a time when a visible tattoo disqualified you from most jobs, many families and several religions. To be tattooed was to declare that you would no longer rely on strangers’ good will, either because you were an adventurer — sailor, yakuza, heavy-metal musician — or because you had such poor judgment that you were likely to alienate people anyway. Now the tattooed type has expanded to include hairdressers and graphic designers, accountants and yoga teachers and — perhaps most disturbingly — cool dads. I know a dozen people with full sleeves, and all but one of them have children. Their sleeves now read as an indictment of nonconformism rather than an assertion of it — which is weird, because the tattoos themselves haven’t changed. I have two tattoos. The one people see is on my left bicep: a barn swallow, which we had around the house when I was growing up. I got it when ...Read More »

NYC Tattoo Convention March 7-9

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By Marisa Kakoulas Source: www.needlesandsins.com As we first posted back in October, the original the NYC Tattoo Convention will be taking place March 7-9, 2014 at the the historic Roseland Ballroom — before this legendary venue closes in April (hence, why the show won’t be taking place as it usually does in May). And as always, we’re stoked for the show, particularly for its finely curated line-up of tattooers from around the world, including long-time legends, and also traditional hand-tattooing booths. There are some great sideshow performances, and tattoo competitions that really present some stellar work. Plus, the kickass vendors offer badass merch. [Literally, “badass.”] I have been attending the NYC Convention for 13 years, and it has consistently been one of the most electric shows I attend. I’ll be doing a book signing there this year for my latest monster, “Black Tattoo Art II.” Just follow the loud maniacal laugh when you get to the convention and you’ll find me. Read the full article here: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/02/nyc-tattoo-convention-march-7-9.htmlRead More »

Pretty Vacant: The Graphic Language of Punk

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Saturday, January 25th – Saturday, March 15th The Galleries at Moore, Philadelphia, PA Source: www.moore.edu FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF EXHIBITION-RELATED PROGRAMS, CLICK HERE A survey of the extraordinary diversity of punk and post-punk graphic design, Pretty Vacant: The Graphic Language of Punk features several hundred posters, flyers, fanzines, handbills, record sleeves and other graphic ephemera from the collection of Andrew Krivine. Emerging in the mid-1970s, punk was truly popular culture on the margins, with new ideas germinating out of a sense of urgency and seemingly random aesthetic collisions. Before it became commercially commodified into a simplified mishmash of safety pins, mohawks and anarchy symbols, punk was as much about its wide range of visual signifiers at it was a kind of music. A do-it-yourself approach and a loathing of commercial slickness were key hallmarks of the punk attitude, informing not just the music, but also the explosion of graphic design that accompanied it. Taking cues from a wealth of influences ranging from Dadaism to the Situationist International to pulp fiction, and communicating the themes of nihilism, black humor and reappropriation, the visual language of punk was a pastiche of imagery that reflected the consciousness and anti-aesthetic of a new counterculture. Featuring several hundred works on loan from New York-based collector Andrew Krivine, the exhibition includes iconic works by some of the most illustrious graphic artists of the period, including Barney Bubbles, Malcolm Garrett, Raymond Pettibon, Jamie Reid, Peter Saville, Linder Sterling, Gee Vaucher and Arturo Vega, as well as pieces created by the hands of talented, yet anonymous, artists. Beyond the ‘holy trinity’ ...Read More »

Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune

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Photos and interview by Ino Mei Source: www.heartbeatink.gr Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune, the only apprentice of Horiyoshi III apart from his son Souryou Kazuyoshi and part of Horiyoshi III family, spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about the path in tattooing, the “Shu Ha Ri” learning system, the highly importance of the design and the “limits” of tradition. How were you first introduced to tattoo? When I was twelve years old I started Martial Arts. As a kid, from a really young age I was constantly drawing. So when the Martial Arts came into the picture, I started drawing Asian themes and especially Japanese; like dragons and all sorts of stuff. When I was fourteen, we were on a trip with my family to San Francisco and by chance I walked into “Tattoo City” which is Ed Hardy’s tattoo shop. Of course I had absolutely no idea about it. I bought Ed Hardy’s yellow “Tattoo Time” and Sandi Fellman’s “Japanese Tattoo” book and then I was drawing out of those books all the time. I was crazy for them. At that age, I had many older friends and when we returned to Germany after San Francisco, they asked me to design some tattoos for them because they liked my drawings and they couldn’t draw themselves. So I drew some designs for them and they went and got them tattooed. I kept drawing and drawing tattoos until I finished high-school and went for my A – levels. At that time I started tattooing. It was 1995 ...Read More »

Tattoo Stories Episode 8: Shawn Barber

Shot by Estevan Oriol Read more about Shawn’s amazing work HERE Read More »

TATSoul Tattoo Supply’s Newest Innovation: The Rage Power Supply

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TATSoul Tattoo Supply has just released their highly-anticipate Rage Power Supply. This cutting edge tattoo power supply not only features top-of-the-line technology, but also includes a sleek, practical design. The Rage features a precision CNC machined and anodized aircraft aluminum silver frame and knob. The Rage Power Supply is the first OLED display power supply in the industry. The OLED display features an efficient, crisp, and bright display screen. The Rage features a flush display interface for easy application of barrier film. The Rage Power Supply gives you the option to program up to four voltage presets. The preset buttons allow you to recall the voltage values for any four of your favorite tattoo machines. In addition, a built-in timer is included to assist artists with tracking tattoo session time. The Rage Power Supply is specially designed and engineered to allow your tattoo machine to operate at their ultimate efficiency. The Rage provides consistent and smooth output power to your rotary or coil tattoo machines. You have the option of choosing a touch screen model or a dial model. TATSoul is known to stand by their product. The Rage comes complete with 2 year warranty, so rest assure, these are built to last.Read More »

Lyle Tuttle Tattoos on All 7 Continents

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Anna Felicity Friedman                                                                FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 2/10/14 tattoohistorian.com +1 773 307-2753 tattoohistorian@gmail.com Lyle Tuttle Tattoos on All 7 Continents Becomes First Person to Accomplish This Feat On January 21, 2014, 82-year-old tattoo legend Lyle Tuttle became the first person to tattoo on all 7 continents. A long-standing “bucket list” item of his, this accomplishment fulfilled a personal mission for Mr. Tuttle. He said of the endeavor: “Because I was lucky to have the greatest time slot that any tattoo artist ever had in tattooing, it wound up that I had tattooed on six continents. So I had an opportunity to tattoo on seven continents. Well, I’m not out to break any records but why not do it, it’s there! Edmund Hillary, they asked him why he climbed Mount Everest, and he said ‘because it was there’.” After a long trip to the tip of South America, he and project assistant/tattoo historian Dr. Anna Felicity Friedman, flew across the Drake Passage on a 6-seat charter flight. Still plagued by after-effects from a bout of frostbite acquired while serving in the Marines in the Korean War, the trip posed a particular challenge for Mr. Tuttle. The two travelers spent a full day touring, seeing—among the many wonders of the icy southern world— glaciers, icebergs, penguins, seals, and whales—and experiencing what life ...Read More »

Shenpa II

By Nick Baxter www.nbaxter.com Here’s a process sequence for a tiny diptych painting I did a few months ago related to the recurring theme in my work of healing wounds.  This tiny little pair will be included in the forthcoming art catalogue Pint Size Paintings Volume 2, which compiles these small paintings completed by members of the worldwide tattoo community, and features them in a traveling art show. I wrote about the Tibetan Buddhist symbolism surrounding my use of the hook symbol last year, after completing Shenpa I (which now resides in the collection of the amazing and prolific figurative painter Shawn Barber!).Read More »

The Canvases Walk in the Door: A Brooklyn Tattoo Parlor Popular with foreigners

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By Carroll Gardens Source: www.nytimes.com The brownstone-lined streets of Carroll Gardens may not seem like much of a tourist destination. But brand Brooklyn is ascendant these days, and foreigners come to idle at farm-to-table restaurants and browse in fanciful boutiques.And farther south, where affluence gives way to aluminum siding and Smith Street dead-ends under the din of the Gowanus Expressway, visitors come for a more permanent souvenir: authentic Brooklyn ink. On a recent Thursday, Yossy Yoshino, 35, a tattoo artist from Japan, lay face down on a massage table at Smith Street Tattoo Parlour while Dan Santoro, 31, inscribed a pig in a bikini on his back (“three tops, one for each set of teats,” Mr. Santoro explained). The words “Weird World” floated above the pig’s head. Mr. Yoshino, a teardrop tattoo dripping from his eye, said he had traveled thousands of miles from his home in Okinawa to get a “New York tattoo.” Just what makes a New York tattoo can be a bit difficult to pin down. The shop’s owner, Bert Krak, 35, described the parlor’s style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in.Read More »

THIS IS NOT A TOY

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An Exhibition of the Contemporary Art + Collectible Design Celebrate the World’s First Large-Scale Exhibition Dedicated to Designer Toys at the Design exchange.  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – TORONTO, Canada – February 7, 2014 – Design Exchange (DX),Canada’s Design Museum, is proud to present a series of firsts with its playful, unprecedented exhibition This Is Not A Toy, guest curated by music and fashion mogul Pharrell Williams. The first major original programming produced by DX. The first foray into museum curation for cultural connector Williams. The first time coveted artists, Brooklyn’s KAWS and Japan’s Takashi Murakami, have shown their work in a design museum. Dedicated to exploring the conceptual toy – a form made solely as an expression of an aesthetic or idea – as a fine art and design object, as well as a contemporary cultural signifier, This Is Not A Toy marks the first time these vibrant collectible sculptures, figures and paintings have collectively been on display in a museum setting.Read More »

Illegal tattoo artist who used a dirty toothbrush to clean his equipment is jailed after huge Alice in Wonderland etching leaves a woman’s back covered in scars

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By: www.dailymail.co.uk Professionals:  Thoughts on this??  Please comment… Nicki Tony Newlands drank while working in unsanitary conditions in his kitchen Court hears he used Old Spice stick deodorant to affix stencil transfer Environmental health officials acted after complaint from disgruntled customer She was left in agony after huge fairytale tattoo became infected Newlands was jailed for four months and had £1,000 of tattoo tools seized An unlicensed tattooist has been jailed after his botched Alice In Wonderland etching across a young woman’s back left her in agonising pain and scarred for life. Tony Newlands worked in unsanitary conditions in the kitchen of his home in Carlisle, Cumbria, where a lack of sterilising equipment created a serious risk of infection, a court heard. He improvised around a lack of suitable equipment by using a ‘dirty’ toothbrush to clean his tattooing tools and an Old Spice deodorant stick to apply stencil transfers to customers. Newlands’ illegal enterprise hit the skids after an inept attempt at an Alice In Wonderland tattoo which spanned most the back of a young woman in her 20s. After two sessions on the detailed design, the  woman was unable to bear the pain and asked him to stop. She fell sick when the etching got infected and was left with ugly scars. At Carlisle Magistrates Court, Newlands admitted a single offence of failing to ensure his customers were not exposed to risk under health and safety law. Clare Liddle, prosecuting for Carlisle City Council, described how Newlands’ victim ...Read More »

For Restless Pioneer of Modern Tattoo Art, a Life Beyond Ink

By David Gonzalez Source: www.nytimes.com Visitors to the cluttered studio inside Thom DeVita’s Victorian house marvel at the artwork that covers the walls, his drawing table, even his hands. The images reflect not just his interests, but his skills, which he honed as a tattoo artist on the Lower East Side for some 30 years; a storied era to aficionados. The accomplishment was all the more remarkable because it was illegal in New York City at the time. Nowadays, it seems everybody has a tattoo. If there is someone to thank for the art’s increased acceptance and visibility, it might be Mr. DeVita. Every month, Chris Grosso brings admirers up to visit the old master, in Newburgh, the upstate town where he has lived since leaving the Lower East Side in the early 1990s. “He is one of the founders of modern tattooing,” said Mr. Grosso, who befriended Mr. DeVita two years ago while filming a documentary about him. “It’s not what you see on reality television, but something that only he and seven other people in the 1960s started, from purely a love for the art form. He wasn’t from a sailor or biker background, where tattooing comes with the territory. They appreciated the great Japanese masters, the people from Samoa. Thom was at the forefront of that.” Growing up in East Harlem, the son of Italian immigrants, Mr. DeVita did not set out to be an artist. After high school, he worked at various jobs, from factory hand to ...Read More »

Dali’s Skull Illusion Still Inspires

Source: www.illusion.scene360.com Warning: This article contains images with nudity. Viewer discretion is advised. A skull formed by seven nude women is an optical illusion by Salvador Dali, who first made a gouache painting of it—titled “InVoluptas Mors,” translating to a desirable death. In 1951, he adapted the work to a live photo shoot with Latvia photographerPhilippe Halsman, as shown in the pictures below. This visual has maintained popularity throughout the years—it has been tattooed on people’s bodies, printed on t-shirts, and artists have re-created it for film posters and magazine covers.Read More »