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Confessions of a Tattoo Artist: Part 2

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Confessions of a Tattoo Artist: Part 1

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Changing of the Guard

  It is with excitement and purpose that I start as the new Editor-in-Chief of Tattoo Artist Magazine. First and foremost, I am committed to continuing the culture of excellence and quality of TAM as admirably lead by outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Crash. I recognize the importance of TAM to our community & cultural progress and envision clear potential for continued growth and innovation. In conjunction with editing every issue of TAM, I also have a vision of further integrating TAM into the hands of avid tattoo collectors and artists, fully mining the educational format of TAM to better serve artists, collectors, readers and our society as a whole. The “changing of the guard” at TAM will bring a new perspective to the magazine. With this change comes a shift in editorial emphasis to make TAM the world’s primary outlet for tattoo culture, tattoo education and tattoo art more relevant to our industry than any other magazine in our field. As the new Editor, my aim will be to increase the availability of important articles, artists, values, social and artistic advancements in our industry. For those of you who are unfamiliar with me, I have been with TAM since it’s inception 11 years ago. Unlike Crash, I am not a tattoo artist, but have paid my dues within the industry for well over a decade. I know the ins and outs of everything tattoo and tattoo related. I am eager to start this position and see where I can help carry TAM into the future. I invite each and every one of you who has any ... Read More »

How much does a full sleeve tattoo cost?

By Kevin Miller www.tattoosnob.com If you have visible tattoos, chances are that someone has asked about how much their idea cost, how much they cost you, or the worst – how much they paid. Well, this article is for those people who are curious. The article specifically talks about a sleeve, but it applies to any tattoo really. Huge props to Dave Tedder for taking the time to answer this on Quora… Tattoos: How much does a full sleeve tattoo (from wrist to shoulder) cost? Your question almost has the same answer as “How much is a sackful of groceries.?” It really depends on where you make your purchase and what’s in the sack, or sleeve. Purchasing a tattoo is the same as making any other investment into art. Sometimes you can find an incredible artist at very reasonable rates and sometimes you can buy a polished turd for tourist prices. Many people spend far too much on sleeves or other large scale tattoos that they will forever remain unhappy with by starting out with the exact same question you have. “How much?” Because with that mentality the next logical move once you receive an answer is to look for it somewhere else for less. Price shopping for tattoos usually leaves you in a subpar artist’s chair receiving subpar art and tattoo services. Then what do you have? A sleeve that you’re unhappy with. After a few years of looking at other sleeves that are far better most people choose ... Read More »

Tattoo Artist Magazine: Mike Rubendall Issue #28 Teaser Video

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Traditional Japanese Tattooing with Chris O’Donnell

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TAM #17 Interview with Frank Lee

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Heartbeat Ink with Jondix

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Photos and Interview by Ino Mei Jondix spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about his initiation into tattooing, his past as a tattoo nerd, the first tattoo he ever did; at Tas Danazoglou’s neck, his experience in Greece while been Mike the Athens’apprentice and the issue of copying in Dotwork, which he characterizes as “embarrassing”. What is your actual name? How did the name Jondix come up and what does it mean? My name is Jondix, that’s who I am. Before Jondix, I was another person. My “baptism” made me the human I am now. During one of the art reunions I used to attend with my friends Ciruelo Cabral, Eva Blank, Heinrich and others, this name came up as a joke, but a year later when Ciruelo published a new book, he used it in the credits and I thought it was a sign and that’s how it started to affect me and change my mind in a more artistic way than before. Where you working as an architect in the past? When did you first come into contact with tattoos and how did you get involved with tattooing? I never worked as an architect. in fact I didn’t even finish the university. After seven years I kinda quit… I needed money and I was into parties and guitars and Harleys and all the typical Mediterranean excess… I saw the first tattoos as a child on people from the army…badly done you know… and then in Boston I saw a good tattoo, a death reaper ... Read More »

Tattoo Stories Episode 13: Eric Gonzalez

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Tattoo Stories Episode 12: Chuey Quintanar

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Don Ed Hardy & Bob Roberts: “Exhibition Match”

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Himalayan High: Tattooing in the Shadow of Everest

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By Kiri Westby When I first heard there was a tattoo convention in Kathmandu, Nepal I was astounded! I lived in Nepal as a college student, worked there as a human rights activist during the recent civil war and have spent a lot of time studying Nepali language and culture. I also married a tattoo artist seven years ago and have been on a crash course of American tattoo culture ever since.  Nowhere in my mind did the tattoo scene that I had come to know and the traditional culture of Nepal mix.  But there it was, website and all, and I was instantly fascinated. My friend Eric Inksmith, a veteran of American tattooing, challenged me to take him to Kathmandu, having never really left the U.S. before. Like a butterfly suddenly wondering about the storms it’s own wings have produced, Eric was curious to follow the trail that he himself had blazed.  I was honored to be enlisted for the job and to have the chance to experience alongside him what tattooing on the other side of the world has become. At almost 70 years old, Eric recalled stories from the National Convention in Philadelphia more than 30 years ago. As I listened to tales of rival biker gangs fighting on convention room floors and people being thrown from hotel room windows, I tried to imagine how the kind, soft-spoken, Nepali people have embraced and come to celebrate tattooing. And not in a subtle, underground way either, the convention ... Read More »

NYC Tattoo Convention March 7-9

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By Marisa Kakoulas Source: www.needlesandsins.com As we first posted back in October, the original the NYC Tattoo Convention will be taking place March 7-9, 2014 at the the historic Roseland Ballroom – before this legendary venue closes in April (hence, why the show won’t be taking place as it usually does in May). And as always, we’re stoked for the show, particularly for its finely curated line-up of tattooers from around the world, including long-time legends, and also traditional hand-tattooing booths. There are some great sideshow performances, and tattoo competitions that really present some stellar work. Plus, the kickass vendors offer badass merch. [Literally, “badass.”] I have been attending the NYC Convention for 13 years, and it has consistently been one of the most electric shows I attend. I’ll be doing a book signing there this year for my latest monster, “Black Tattoo Art II.” Just follow the loud maniacal laugh when you get to the convention and you’ll find me. Read the full article here: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/02/nyc-tattoo-convention-march-7-9.html Read More »

Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune

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Photos and interview by Ino Mei Source: www.heartbeatink.gr Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune, the only apprentice of Horiyoshi III apart from his son Souryou Kazuyoshi and part of Horiyoshi III family, spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about the path in tattooing, the “Shu Ha Ri” learning system, the highly importance of the design and the “limits” of tradition. How were you first introduced to tattoo? When I was twelve years old I started Martial Arts. As a kid, from a really young age I was constantly drawing. So when the Martial Arts came into the picture, I started drawing Asian themes and especially Japanese; like dragons and all sorts of stuff. When I was fourteen, we were on a trip with my family to San Francisco and by chance I walked into “Tattoo City” which is Ed Hardy’s tattoo shop. Of course I had absolutely no idea about it. I bought Ed Hardy’s yellow “Tattoo Time” and Sandi Fellman’s “Japanese Tattoo” book and then I was drawing out of those books all the time. I was crazy for them. At that age, I had many older friends and when we returned to Germany after San Francisco, they asked me to design some tattoos for them because they liked my drawings and they couldn’t draw themselves. So I drew some designs for them and they went and got them tattooed. I kept drawing and drawing tattoos until I finished high-school and went for my A – levels. At that time I started tattooing. It was 1995 ... Read More »

The Canvases Walk in the Door: A Brooklyn Tattoo Parlor Popular with foreigners

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By Carroll Gardens Source: www.nytimes.com The brownstone-lined streets of Carroll Gardens may not seem like much of a tourist destination. But brand Brooklyn is ascendant these days, and foreigners come to idle at farm-to-table restaurants and browse in fanciful boutiques.And farther south, where affluence gives way to aluminum siding and Smith Street dead-ends under the din of the Gowanus Expressway, visitors come for a more permanent souvenir: authentic Brooklyn ink. On a recent Thursday, Yossy Yoshino, 35, a tattoo artist from Japan, lay face down on a massage table at Smith Street Tattoo Parlour while Dan Santoro, 31, inscribed a pig in a bikini on his back (“three tops, one for each set of teats,” Mr. Santoro explained). The words “Weird World” floated above the pig’s head. Mr. Yoshino, a teardrop tattoo dripping from his eye, said he had traveled thousands of miles from his home in Okinawa to get a “New York tattoo.” Just what makes a New York tattoo can be a bit difficult to pin down. The shop’s owner, Bert Krak, 35, described the parlor’s style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in. Read More »

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