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Changing of the Guard

  It is with excitement and purpose that I start as the new Editor-in-Chief of Tattoo Artist Magazine. First and foremost, I am committed to continuing the culture of excellence and quality of TAM as admirably lead by outgoing Editor-in-Chief, Crash. I recognize the importance of TAM to our community & cultural progress and envision clear potential for continued growth and innovation. In conjunction with editing every issue of TAM, I also have a vision of further integrating TAM into the hands of avid tattoo collectors and artists, fully mining the educational format of TAM to better serve artists, collectors, readers and our society as a whole. The “changing of the guard” at TAM will bring a new perspective to the magazine. With this change comes a shift in editorial emphasis to make TAM the world’s primary outlet for tattoo culture, tattoo education and tattoo art more relevant to our industry than any other magazine in our field. As the new Editor, my aim will be to increase the availability of important articles, artists, values, social and artistic advancements in our industry. For those of you who are unfamiliar with me, I have been with TAM since it’s inception 11 years ago. Unlike Crash, I am not a tattoo artist, but have paid my dues within the industry for well over a decade. I know the ins and outs of everything tattoo and tattoo related. I am eager to start this position and see where I can help carry TAM into the future. I invite each and every one of you who has any ... Read More »

Traditional Japanese Tattooing with Chris O’Donnell

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TAM #17 Interview with Frank Lee

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Lit Fuse 10-Year Anniversary Party

Shot and edited by Luke Holley Read More »

Tattoo Stories Episode 13: Eric Gonzalez

Estevan Oriol Read More »

Tattoo Stories Episode 12: Chuey Quintanar

Shot by Estevan Oriol Read More »

Don Ed Hardy & Bob Roberts: “Exhibition Match”

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Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 2

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Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 1

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NYC Tattoo Convention March 7-9

NYC Tattoo Convention flyer

By Marisa Kakoulas Source: As we first posted back in October, the original the NYC Tattoo Convention will be taking place March 7-9, 2014 at the the historic Roseland Ballroom — before this legendary venue closes in April (hence, why the show won’t be taking place as it usually does in May). And as always, we’re stoked for the show, particularly for its finely curated line-up of tattooers from around the world, including long-time legends, and also traditional hand-tattooing booths. There are some great sideshow performances, and tattoo competitions that really present some stellar work. Plus, the kickass vendors offer badass merch. [Literally, “badass.”] I have been attending the NYC Convention for 13 years, and it has consistently been one of the most electric shows I attend. I’ll be doing a book signing there this year for my latest monster, “Black Tattoo Art II.” Just follow the loud maniacal laugh when you get to the convention and you’ll find me. Read the full article here: Read More »

The Canvases Walk in the Door: A Brooklyn Tattoo Parlor Popular with foreigners


By Carroll Gardens Source: The brownstone-lined streets of Carroll Gardens may not seem like much of a tourist destination. But brand Brooklyn is ascendant these days, and foreigners come to idle at farm-to-table restaurants and browse in fanciful boutiques.And farther south, where affluence gives way to aluminum siding and Smith Street dead-ends under the din of the Gowanus Expressway, visitors come for a more permanent souvenir: authentic Brooklyn ink. On a recent Thursday, Yossy Yoshino, 35, a tattoo artist from Japan, lay face down on a massage table at Smith Street Tattoo Parlour while Dan Santoro, 31, inscribed a pig in a bikini on his back (“three tops, one for each set of teats,” Mr. Santoro explained). The words “Weird World” floated above the pig’s head. Mr. Yoshino, a teardrop tattoo dripping from his eye, said he had traveled thousands of miles from his home in Okinawa to get a “New York tattoo.” Just what makes a New York tattoo can be a bit difficult to pin down. The shop’s owner, Bert Krak, 35, described the parlor’s style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in. Read More »

For Restless Pioneer of Modern Tattoo Art, a Life Beyond Ink

By David Gonzalez Source: Visitors to the cluttered studio inside Thom DeVita’s Victorian house marvel at the artwork that covers the walls, his drawing table, even his hands. The images reflect not just his interests, but his skills, which he honed as a tattoo artist on the Lower East Side for some 30 years; a storied era to aficionados. The accomplishment was all the more remarkable because it was illegal in New York City at the time. Nowadays, it seems everybody has a tattoo. If there is someone to thank for the art’s increased acceptance and visibility, it might be Mr. DeVita. Every month, Chris Grosso brings admirers up to visit the old master, in Newburgh, the upstate town where he has lived since leaving the Lower East Side in the early 1990s. “He is one of the founders of modern tattooing,” said Mr. Grosso, who befriended Mr. DeVita two years ago while filming a documentary about him. “It’s not what you see on reality television, but something that only he and seven other people in the 1960s started, from purely a love for the art form. He wasn’t from a sailor or biker background, where tattooing comes with the territory. They appreciated the great Japanese masters, the people from Samoa. Thom was at the forefront of that.” Growing up in East Harlem, the son of Italian immigrants, Mr. DeVita did not set out to be an artist. After high school, he worked at various jobs, from factory hand to ... Read More »

Nephews Skateshop + Gallery Presents Wild And Free January 25, 2014


Port Monmouth, NJ – January 17, 2013 Nephews Skate Shop + Gallery will be hosting WILD AND FREE, a group artist exhibit on Saturday, January 25, 2014 from 6pm to 10pm. The exhibit has been guest curated by Little Chris Smith. WILD AND FREE will feature all original works of local tattoo artists Erik Schmidt, Little Chris Smith, Pete Pederson, Chuck Ordino, and Bryan Keinlen. Nephews will be opening up their doors to the public to host an evening of inspiration, conversation and enjoyment. Erik Schmidt – “Erik has been tattooing in Neptune for several years after ‘doing time’ in Asbury Tattoo. He learned to tattoo under the guidance of Patrick Dean and Dave Shoemaker, following proudly in the tradition of those before him. His focus is clean, solid methodical tattooing, just like his mentors.” Little Chris Smith – “Little Christopher Smith hails from Sandy Hook, New Jersey.  He enjoys a radical lunch, surfing hella waves, skateboarding with buds, and entertaining hot chicks.  You will usually find his best girl, Leche (his baby dog), at his side when he is not tattooing at Neptune Tattooville, where he works for the most gnarly awesome bosses Patrick Dean and Dave Shoemaker.  Little Chris, or LC as his friends call him, prides himself on his ability to get wild and loves his mother like all radical dudes do.” Pete Pedersen – “Pete has taken the long road at achieving his tattoo skills. His background in art of all mediums has proven to be vital in ... Read More »

A Treasure Trove of Antique Tattoo Flash is Found in Corpus Christi


By Craig Hlavaty Source: Long before tattoos were the subject of reality show after reality show and people like Justin Bieber sported ink, tattoos were the milieu of sailors, soldiers, Marines, and maybe circus folk. This weekend, Peveto Art Gallery will display 20 sheets of historic tattoo flash art that were recently found in an abandoned house in Corpus Christi. According to gallery owner Scott Peveto, the flash looks to be over 100 years old. The items were rescued from a Dumpster by a man who cleans out houses that are tagged to be torn down. “I’ve spent enough time with them to know they are real,” said Peveto. The sheets are water and nicotine-stained and more than likely were originally displayed on the walls of a tattoo shop for customers to choose pieces from. The art is on heavy illustration board and shows  signs of wear from push pins. Artist names are included on most. “The majority of them are by the same artist,” said Peveto. You can really pinpoint the ones that don’t quite go with the others. Peveto is looking to sell half the lot at a public unveiling of the exhibit  Saturday night at his Montrose gallery. He said he is going to ask around $2,000 per sheet. The exhibit opens at 6 p.m. Peveto said the work predates the art of  Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, who made his name tattooing sailors, rebels, and rogues. Sailor Jerry’s name is now on rum bottles, art galleries, dorm posters, baby ... Read More »

Fineline Tattoo in the East Village, the Longest Continually Running Tattoo Shop in Manhattan


By Allison B. Siegel Source: Fineline Tattoo opened in 1976 during the New York City ban on tattooing and is considered the longest continually running tattoo shop in Manhattan. It’s located on 1st Street and First Avenue in the East Village. Previously, Mike Bakaty, the founder and owner, operated underground for 36 years in secret back rooms and loft apartments. With the walls adorned with Bakaty’s original flash art, Fineline is definitely near and dear to our skin and to the history of NYC. We interviewed Bakaty and asked him about tattooing and New York City: When did you first fall in love with tattooing? I’m still falling in love with tattooing. I got interested back in ’74 when I went to get some work covered up…I got more interested in ’75…and then by 1976 my interest was such that I started tattooing myself. And you didn’t care that tattooing was illegal at the time in NY? Hell yeah, I cared. Every time the phone rang I jumped thinking it was the cops looking to bust me. After 21 years eventually I got over jumping at the phone. How do you feel at the Bowery now and all the changes going on? Well, you know, it’s not the Bowery I lived on for 34 years, you know? Don’t know how I feel about the changes. When they first built the Whole Foods down here I thought who the hell is gonna come down here and buy food? We tried to save the building we lived in (McGurk’s ... Read More »

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