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How much does a full sleeve tattoo cost?

By Kevin Miller

http://www.tattoosnob.com

If you have visible tattoos, chances are that someone has asked about how much their idea cost, how much they cost you, or the worst – how much they paid. Well, this article is for those people who are curious. The article specifically talks about a sleeve, but it applies to any tattoo really.

Huge props to Dave Tedder for taking the time to answer this on Quora…

Tattoos: How much does a full sleeve tattoo (from wrist to shoulder) cost?

Your question almost has the same answer as “How much is a sackful of groceries.?” It really depends on where you make your purchase and what’s in the sack, or sleeve.

Purchasing a tattoo is the same as making any other investment into art. Sometimes you can find an incredible artist at very reasonable rates and sometimes you can buy a polished turd for tourist prices.

Many people spend far too much on sleeves or other large scale tattoos that they will forever remain unhappy with by starting out with the exact same question you have. “How much?” Because with that mentality the next logical move once you receive an answer is to look for it somewhere else for less. Price shopping for tattoos usually leaves you in a subpar artist’s chair receiving subpar art and tattoo services. Then what do you have? A sleeve that you’re unhappy with. After a few years of looking at other sleeves that are far better most people choose to go to another artist to try and salvage the bad decision they made years prior. The smart ones have done research and decided on a competent artist at the second time, but… The truth of the matter is, at this point the tattooer is entering a fight with one arm tied behind their back. Cover ups and reworks never turn out the same quality as a tattoo that starts with blank skin. Success is determined by wether or not the tattoo looks better than it did before, not by completion of original intent.

I can assure you that the best way to get an answer to your question and a quality tattoo is to decide what you would like your sleeve to look like. Think style(i.e. Traditional Japanese or Americana, color or black and grey, realistic, geometric, etc.), think theme, think subject matter. Then spend hours and hours scouring the internet and social media sites at hundreds of hundred of tattooers work. This is a much easier task today than say 20 years ago when you physically had to travel shop to shop to look at portfolios. Don’t bother looking at the artists location, airplanes make the world a very small place, and when you find the artist that you want, I promise no distance is too great. You have your entire life to wear this tattoo and you shouldn’t sell yourself short. Make sure that every time you look at your forearm you’re satisfied. Tattoos are the only thing you have with you for the rest of your life, everywhere you go until you die. It amazes me what some people will spend on shoes or vacations and then bargain shop for a tattoo.

After you have all of the above determined, contact the artist you’ve chosen and ask about their preferred method of appointment consultation. Please keep in mind that many quality tattoo artists eat sleep and breath their jobs so sometimes answering the emails takes a little time, especially older artists that have tattooed longer than the internet has been around. Many artists work 8-12 hours a day at the studio then go home to paint or draw for the following days/weeks, so sometimes you need a little patience and persistence. During your consultation, after you’ve discussed your ideas you’ll have the opportunity for “How much?”. But most artist prefer it if you’re a wee bit smoother, as in “What’s your hourly rate?”, and “About how many sessions do you think this will take and how many hours will we be working per session?”. If this exceeds your projected budget this would be a good time to mention that and discuss other options. Be honest and up front with what you have to spend. Most good artists that I know aren’t crooks, they just want what they have determined their work is worth. Some adjust this by the laws of supply and demand and others keep a set rate their entire career. Every artist is different, and as always in the art market it’s buyer beware. Do your homework before you purchase.

Hope that helps

Dave Tedder


Traditional Japanese Tattooing with Chris O’Donnell


TAM #17 Interview with Frank Lee


Knives & Needles with Grime

By Molly Kitamura

http://www.knivesandneedlesblog.com

Grime, Grime, Grime. One of the best tattoo artists in the world! On the slim chance you have not heard of him, he has a shop called Skull and Sword in San Francisco. He is widely known for being a renaissance man of tattooing (and art in general!). What I mean by that is that man consistently crushes any tattoo or style of tattoo requested of him no matter what it is. Grime has created his own style in the process, one that cannot be imitated or replicated although many have tried and failed. Basically you have to see his work for yourself to understand what I am talking about and I highly recommend checking him out!

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But today that is besides the point. Today we are talking Grime and his food! Mr. Grime can also cook (…renaissance man…) and he occasionally sends me photos of his dishes. They always look amazing. The other day he sent me a particularly mouth-watering photo of his pan-fried salmon filet with an oven-roasted yam and sautéed spinach garnished with raisins, pine nuts and a balsamic glaze. That photo had me seriously second-guessing what I had already decided to cook for dinner that night. You can never go wrong with simple yet sophisticated! Check out a few great recipes and some of Grime’s tattoo work below… Cheers!

I will try my best to recreate Grime’s recipes for you all. Try this dish for your next dinner, you will love it!

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Grime’s Pan-fried Salmon Filet With Oven-roasted Yam and Sautéed Spinach

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Guy Aitchison’s 2 Day Webinar: Reinventing The Tattoo

By Guy Aitchison

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For a decade and a half now I’ve been perfecting my Reinventing The Tattoo curriculum, which teaches some of the fundamentals of artistic design in a way that can be applied toward making your tattoo work stronger, more dynamic, and more unique. It’s an educational program that has been attended by many artists who are now among the industry’s top artists and educators. So I’m psyched to offer this first installment of Reinventing The Tattoo in interactive webinar format. That means that you can attend it online from anywhere in the world but still participate in the critiques, exercises and discussion. I’m offering a limit of 30 tickets so that everyone’s work gets enough time on-screen, where I not only critique it but also use Photoshop to demonstrate ways of improving it. It can also be attended in person at a hotel near us in Marion, Illinois, but many webinar participants have found that the closeup, high definition experience they get on their computers is almost better than being there in person.

It starts on April 8, where I’ll begin by going over the Reinventing fundamentals: Flow and fit, positive/negative relationships, contrast, priority and reserve, lines and edges, depth, and lighting effects. We follow that by doing an on-screen critique of each participant’s work, applying the concepts that were demonstrated at the beginning of the day. At the end of the session I’ll be handing out exercises for everyone to work on that night. Then, on April 9 we’ll go over everyone’s exercises so we can see how all the important fundamentals have been applied, and then follow up with a group of closeup video clips that demonstrate my latest understandings about technique. The Reinventing The Tattoo webinar is both immersive and interactive; wherever you live you can a part of this concentrated learning experience. Tickets are available now at the http://www.TattooEducation.com online store and TattooNOW.com/Webinars.


Lit Fuse 10-Year Anniversary Party

Shot and edited by Luke Holley


Tattoo Stories Episode 13: Eric Gonzalez

Estevan Oriol


Tattoo Stories Episode 12: Chuey Quintanar

Shot by Estevan Oriol


Don Ed Hardy & Bob Roberts: “Exhibition Match”


Tattoo Stories Episode 11: Macko

Shot by Estivan Oriol


Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 3


Fitzroy X Some Quality Meat new year’s BASH 2014

Some Quality Meat collaborated with Fitzroy Amsterdam to organize their annual new year’s bash.  Kim Papanatos Rense made six classic nautical designs that are now placed on Fitzroy’s office walls, dishes and pig legs.  The night ended in a huge party.


Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 2


Himalayan High: Tattooing in the Shadow of Everest

By Kiri Westby

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When I first heard there was a tattoo convention in Kathmandu, Nepal I was astounded!

I lived in Nepal as a college student, worked there as a human rights activist during the recent civil war and have spent a lot of time studying Nepali language and culture. I also married a tattoo artist seven years ago and have been on a crash course of American tattoo culture ever since.  Nowhere in my mind did the tattoo scene that I had come to know and the traditional culture of Nepal mix.  But there it was, website and all, and I was instantly fascinated.

My friend Eric Inksmith, a veteran of American tattooing, challenged me to take him to Kathmandu, having never really left the U.S. before. Like a butterfly suddenly wondering about the storms it’s own wings have produced, Eric was curious to follow the trail that he himself had blazed.  I was honored to be enlisted for the job and to have the chance to experience alongside him what tattooing on the other side of the world has become.

At almost 70 years old, Eric recalled stories from the National Convention in Philadelphia more than 30 years ago. As I listened to tales of rival biker gangs fighting on convention room floors and people being thrown from hotel room windows, I tried to imagine how the kind, soft-spoken, Nepali people have embraced and come to celebrate tattooing. And not in a subtle, underground way either, the convention was being held at the famous Yak & Yeti hotel, one of the most iconic establishments in the Kathmandu valley.

As these things go, friends were recruited, word of the adventure spread and we soon had a posse heading East from the U.S., including: Mike Wilson, Mac Bibby, Robert Ryan, Jae Connor, Phill Bartell and Chad Koeplinger. Eric handled the longest flight of his life and no one killed each other on the way over…in fact, from the beginning, everything felt pretty magical.

Kathmandu has changed significantly since 2007. Corruption and an inefficient, newly-Democratic government have left city services under-funded and unattended. Half-finished construction projects leave gaping holes and exposed power lines, not to mention the electrical brown-outs and water shortages, which have left things feeling chaotic on the streets. But the upside to Nepal’s new political landscape is that there is also more public art and individual self-expression, and many people I spoke to were hopeful and optimistic for Nepal’s future, a far cry from my time here during the war in 2003. Part of this new self-expression has manifested in a relatively fresh and exciting tattoo scene.
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Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 1


NYC Tattoo Convention March 7-9

By Marisa Kakoulas

Source: http://www.needlesandsins.com

NYC Tattoo Convention flyer

As we first posted back in October, the original the NYC Tattoo Convention will be taking place March 7-9, 2014 at the the historic Roseland Ballroom – before this legendary venue closes in April (hence, why the show won’t be taking place as it usually does in May).

And as always, we’re stoked for the show, particularly for its finely curated line-up of tattooers from around the world, including long-time legends, and also traditional hand-tattooing booths. There are some great sideshow performances, and tattoo competitions that really present some stellar work. Plus, the kickass vendors offer badass merch. [Literally, "badass."]

I have been attending the NYC Convention for 13 years, and it has consistently been one of the most electric shows I attend. I’ll be doing a book signing there this year for my latest monster, “Black Tattoo Art II.” Just follow the loud maniacal laugh when you get to the convention and you’ll find me.

Read the full article here: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/02/nyc-tattoo-convention-march-7-9.html


Illegal tattoo artist who used a dirty toothbrush to clean his equipment is jailed after huge Alice in Wonderland etching leaves a woman’s back covered in scars

By: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Professionals:  Thoughts on this??  Please comment…

Nicki

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  • Tony Newlands drank while working in unsanitary conditions in his kitchen
  • Court hears he used Old Spice stick deodorant to affix stencil transfer
  • Environmental health officials acted after complaint from disgruntled customer
  • She was left in agony after huge fairytale tattoo became infected
  • Newlands was jailed for four months and had £1,000 of tattoo tools seized

An unlicensed tattooist has been jailed after his botched Alice In Wonderland etching across a young woman’s back left her in agonising pain and scarred for life.

Tony Newlands worked in unsanitary conditions in the kitchen of his home in Carlisle, Cumbria, where a lack of sterilising equipment created a serious risk of infection, a court heard.

He improvised around a lack of suitable equipment by using a ‘dirty’ toothbrush to clean his tattooing tools and an Old Spice deodorant stick to apply stencil transfers to customers.

Newlands’ illegal enterprise hit the skids after an inept attempt at an Alice In Wonderland tattoo which spanned most the back of a young woman in her 20s.

After two sessions on the detailed design, the  woman was unable to bear the pain and asked him to stop. She fell sick when the etching got infected and was left with ugly scars.

At Carlisle Magistrates Court, Newlands admitted a single offence of failing to ensure his customers were not exposed to risk under health and safety law.

Clare Liddle, prosecuting for Carlisle City Council, described how Newlands’ victim contacted environmental health officials and told them that he had ‘wrecked her back’.

Neither the defendant, nor the property he was using in Ridley Road, Currock, were registered for tattoo work.

The woman revealed how she had paid up to £100 for two days of tattoo work.

‘The work was carried out in the kitchen of the property,’ said Mrs Liddle. ‘She described how during the tattoo, she sat on a kitchen stool and leant over the worktop.

‘There was a cat in the kitchen and the defendant was drinking. He also had a few cigarette breaks during the tattoo. He used an Old Spice deodorant stick to stick the transfer onto her back.

‘It’s likely that this deodorant stick was used on other customers, creating a risk of infection.’

The woman saw no cleaning equipment, though Newlands did use gloves and disposable needles, said Mrs Liddle.

After the second painful tattooing session, she added, the woman’s back became so badly infected the she could not sleep for a few days.

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Botched: The massive but ineptly drafted Alice In Wonderland tattoo – criticized by a legitimate tattoo artist as the worst he’d seen – which left this young woman scarred for life and in agony when it became infected.

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Both Donna Hastie, the environmental health officer who investigated the case, and legitimate local tattoo artist Colin Fell said the Alice in Wonderland tattoo was the worst they had seen.
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A Review on Jeff Gogue’s “tattoo as I see it”

By Nicki Kasper

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“In that moment, I realized that instead of trying to be inspired, I was going to try to inspire people.”

I recently ordered two copies of Jeff Gogue’s DVD, “tattoo as I see it”… Jeff is one of my closest and most genuine friends and I wanted to support his project, something I know he and put a lot of work, time, money, energy and heart into.  I bought a copy for myself, and one for a close friend of mine – an artist I thought could use some inspiration.  I didn’t know exactly what the DVD would be like, but I know Jeff, and I knew it would be inspiring, as well as very giving with valuable information and advice to tattooers… I just now was able to find the time to sit down and watch it, and it doesn’t disappoint.

I know Jeff in a couple different ways…  We’re friends; I know him on a personal level, and he’s fun, open, genuine, kind, generous, and hilarious. I’m also one of his clients, so I know him on that level.  I know how much he cares about his clients, about the pieces he puts on our bodies, about the pain we’re feeling, etc.  I know how much heart he puts into every single piece, and I’m grateful and fortunate to be covered in them.  But in addition to being a friend, and a client, I’ve also had the pleasure of working with him on side projects.

I know from experience that nothing Jeff Gogue does professionally or otherwise is half-assed.  He cares about the details.  If he decides he’s going to do something, he wants to give all of himself to it.  If it has his name on it, he wants it to be the absolute best he has to offer at that time and place.  He never thinks he’s reached his full potential, which is why we see his work changing and evolving over and over. I can relate to him in many ways, which I think is part of the reason we became instant friends so many years ago.

“You’re either a taker, or you’re a giver.”

He wants to inspire others, and that is the point of this movie.  It will inspire everyone who watches, artist or not.  He’s honest and open about his process, what he wants, his strengths and weaknesses.  It’s real, and humble and people can always relate to that.

If you’re an artist, you will be blown away at how generous Jeff is with information that will help you from laying out a piece to tips on using contrast in your work to mixing colors.  It’s invaluable information that he’s learned by trial and error over the years and he’s sharing it all with you. But if you’re not an artist, and you just want to be inspired about believing in yourself and making shit happen for yourself… About not accepting failure, and instead being driven by it, you need to watch this film.

To Jeff and Ryan Moon – You guys did an incredible job on this, and now I wish I hadn’t been such a chicken about being interviewed for it! I’m proud of you both!


Tattoo Age: Grime Part 2


Tattoo Stores Episode 5: Franco Vescovi

Shot by Estevan Oriol


TAM CYBER MONDAY SALE!!!

Cyber Monday!!!!!
Check out the AMAZING deals we are offering for Cyber Monday!
All issues $5.99 off
Gods & Warriors: The Works of Chris Treviño: $69.99
TAM Volume 1 Book: $39.99
TAM Subscriptions: $36.00
www.GetTAM.com

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Amsterdam Tattoo Museum Closure Story

By John Niederkorn 

Reblogged from: http://tattoomuseum.wordpress.com

Since the closure of the Amsterdam Tattoo Museum (ATM) in Nov. 2012 the tattoo community, along with fans and followers of the museum have had many questions about its untimely closure.

Today the intention is to shed some light on this subject by presenting *bankruptcy documents levied against the museum’s main financer and location provider Mrs. Mary Jeannette Leonora Seret, and her private company by the name of Partners at Work BV…
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*1.7 Cause of bankruptcy

The bankrupt company is engaged in the reintegration of long-term unemployed people and people who have trouble finding labor. The orders were to do so – after tender – awarded by the municipalities or social services.

At one point, a partnership was established between Mr. Henk Schiffmacher or the foundation Amsterdam Tattoo Museum and the bankrupt company. Mr. Schiffmacher, known tattoo artist, had the desire for its collection accessible to a wide audience in a museum and for the bankrupt company was ‘ideal’ means to place multiple people from the reintegration purposes to work in this museum.

Henk Schiffmacher and Seret agreed the Schiffmacher collection would be housed at the Plantage Middenlaan 62 location. In conjunction with this agreement Seret and her Partners at Work BV company had an agreement with the Dutch government to provide employees for museum, under which its main function was to give employment to reformed criminals and “underprivileged” individuals… Due to the nature of the Seret’s company she received financial backing from the local government.

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Based on this agreement, Partners at Work BV claimed to invest 1 million Euros in the ATM…

*Housing was sought and found in the building currently in use at the Plantage Middenlaan 60-62 in Amsterdam.
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Last Sparrow Tattoo Interview with Todd Noble


Last Sparrow Tattoo Interview with Scott Sylvia

Get TAM issue 10 with an interview on Scott Sylvia:

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