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Tattoo Age: Troy Denning Part 1


*NEW* Photos Added to the Gallery

Tattoos by Marco Tafuri

http://www.facebook.com/marco.tafuri

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TCM #5: Available NOW!

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Tattoo Culture Magazine #5 featuring Gunnar, Eric Inksmith, Shawn Barber and more is now available on the App Store at:

http://www.tattooculturemagazine.com/app

Digital edition for all other devices/computer go to:

http://www.tattooculturemagazine.com


The Existential Anguish of the Tattoo

By Dan Brooks

Source: http://www.nytimes.com

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Somewhere between the release of “Reality Bites” and the closing of MTV’s sports bureau, my generation got tattoos. We were not the first Americans to do so, but we were the first to do it en masse. Now, two decades later, we are becoming the first to carry them into middle age. It turns out tattoos are permanent, even when little else is.

Like many important signifiers of the 1990s, tattoos began as a gesture of rebellion and became so ubiquitous as to carry no stigma at all. There was a time when a visible tattoo disqualified you from most jobs, many families and several religions. To be tattooed was to declare that you would no longer rely on strangers’ good will, either because you were an adventurer — sailor, yakuza, heavy-metal musician — or because you had such poor judgment that you were likely to alienate people anyway.

Now the tattooed type has expanded to include hairdressers and graphic designers, accountants and yoga teachers and — perhaps most disturbingly — cool dads. I know a dozen people with full sleeves, and all but one of them have children. Their sleeves now read as an indictment of nonconformism rather than an assertion of it — which is weird, because the tattoos themselves haven’t changed.

I have two tattoos. The one people see is on my left bicep: a barn swallow, which we had around the house when I was growing up. I got it when I was 22 and obsessed with the metric shape of sentences. I believed that I could describe the swoop of a swallow in a sentence whose syntax paralleled the path of flight, itself reflected in the Bézier curve between the bird’s shoulder and head. After weeks of increasingly crazy rewrites of the sentence, I got the tattoo to exorcise a demon from my craft.

I also wanted poetry girls to look at my upper arm. I got my barn swallow at New York Adorned, and I like it. They do good work there, and my tattoo reminds me of a slightly different East Village, where I could walk down Second Avenue with plastic wrap on my arm, covering the fresh ink, and have a beer in Mars Bar. The bartender listened to my crazy syntax explanation and asked relevant questions, even though no sane person could actually be interested in that. Prosody as a visible line doesn’t mean much to me now, but the tattoo does. That once was, the tattoo says, and the memory remains, even as it becomes strange.

The tattoo that most people don’t see is a six-inch asterisk on my right shoulder blade. I got it my sophomore year of college, just after I turned 19. The tattoo guy asked me to bring in a pattern for him to trace, but all the asterisks I could find to print out had five points, and I wanted one with eight. Twenty minutes of brisk outlining and six hours of bloody fill work later, I had a recreation of the asterisk on Anthony Kiedis’s wrist, which I hadn’t realized was the central motif in the logo for the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Over the next few years, the Chili Peppers went from a band I sort of liked to one that annoyed me immensely. They sound like Vinnie Barbarino arguing with a pinball machine. Occasionally someone will see my eight-pointed asterisk and ask if I am a Red Hot Chili Peppers fan, and I claim to be the victim of a bad coincidence. Really, I saw Kiedis’s asterisk and thought I could get away with it.

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NYC Tattoo Convention March 7-9

By Marisa Kakoulas

Source: http://www.needlesandsins.com

NYC Tattoo Convention flyer

As we first posted back in October, the original the NYC Tattoo Convention will be taking place March 7-9, 2014 at the the historic Roseland Ballroom – before this legendary venue closes in April (hence, why the show won’t be taking place as it usually does in May).

And as always, we’re stoked for the show, particularly for its finely curated line-up of tattooers from around the world, including long-time legends, and also traditional hand-tattooing booths. There are some great sideshow performances, and tattoo competitions that really present some stellar work. Plus, the kickass vendors offer badass merch. [Literally, "badass."]

I have been attending the NYC Convention for 13 years, and it has consistently been one of the most electric shows I attend. I’ll be doing a book signing there this year for my latest monster, “Black Tattoo Art II.” Just follow the loud maniacal laugh when you get to the convention and you’ll find me.

Read the full article here: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/02/nyc-tattoo-convention-march-7-9.html


Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune

Photos and interview by Ino Mei

Source: http://www.heartbeatink.gr

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Alex “Kofuu” Reinke Horikitsune, the only apprentice of Horiyoshi III apart from his son Souryou Kazuyoshi and part of Horiyoshi III family, spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about the path in tattooing, the “Shu Ha Ri” learning system, the highly importance of the design and the “limits” of tradition.

How were you first introduced to tattoo?

When I was twelve years old I started Martial Arts. As a kid, from a really young age I was constantly drawing. So when the Martial Arts came into the picture, I started drawing Asian themes and especially Japanese; like dragons and all sorts of stuff. When I was fourteen, we were on a trip with my family to San Francisco and by chance I walked into “Tattoo City” which is Ed Hardy’s tattoo shop. Of course I had absolutely no idea about it. I bought Ed Hardy’s yellow “Tattoo Time” and Sandi Fellman’s “Japanese Tattoo” book and then I was drawing out of those books all the time. I was crazy for them. At that age, I had many older friends and when we returned to Germany after San Francisco, they asked me to design some tattoos for them because they liked my drawings and they couldn’t draw themselves. So I drew some designs for them and they went and got them tattooed.

I kept drawing and drawing tattoos until I finished high-school and went for my A – levels. At that time I started tattooing. It was 1995 and I was twenty-one. I bought a starter kit and I began teaching myself; I am self-taught. Pretty hideous, but what can you do? Then I went straight to the army, where I was also tattooing. Afterwards I met Horiyoshi III in Bologna at a convention in 1997. A few months later, in 1998, I went to Japan to start my body-suit. There I saw and realized that I could make a decent living from tattooing. Back then things were different and therefore I took a huge risk; in many people’s eyes it seemed “crazy” that I became a tattooist. It was socially “unacceptable” and perceived as “a step down” from my family; although they offered me the freedom to decide what I wanted to become. My dad is a surgeon and told me “you have to decide yourself about what you want to do for a living. When I am dead, you’ll still have your job and I don’t want to be responsible for you not being happy with your job”. He knew I was into tattooing, but he thought that tattoo was a phase. Like all kids go through phases. But this one stuck (laughs)!

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What happened when you went to Japan to get tattooed by Horiyoshi III?

I was totally into Japan, as I’ve previously mentioned, since I was a kid. I was also used to serving from being in the army; therefore I believe that the combination of those two resulted in me knowing my way around Japan quite well and I think that Horiyoshi III was taken by it, and we got along very well. At the end of 1998 Horiyoshi III came to Germany for the Berlin Tattoo Convention; he wrote me a letter asking to whether we could meet there and I took some time off in order to meet him. All of a sudden, I was the “organizer” for everything, because I could communicate with Horiyoshi III. It turned out really great. We had a great time together and we became friends.

How did your friendship “evolve” from this point onwards?

In the beginning of 1999 I went back to Japan to get tattooed again. I asked Horiyoshi III if he had a student, and he was like “no I don’t take any students”. Then, there was the Tokyo Tattoo Convention towards at the end of the same year and he said “you have to come again to Japan”. That is when I met the old-timers and many of the friends I have today like Lucky Bastard (Horiko), Mick from Zurich, Filip Leu, Luke Atkinson, Chris Garver, Marcus Paecheco; all super-great guys. It was a really important convention for all of us.

A couple of months after the convention, Horiyoshi III came to Germany again and I joined him on a trip to London to buy antiques. And Horiyoshi III asked me there, in London, in a black cab on the way to some antique shop, if I was still interested in being part of the Horiyoshi Family…

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To read the full article, visit: http://heartbeatink.gr/en/columns-features/artists-studios-columns-features/horikitsune/#!prettyPhoto[]/0/


Tattoo Stories Episode 8: Shawn Barber

Shot by Estevan Oriol


TATSoul Tattoo Supply’s Newest Innovation: The Rage Power Supply

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TATSoul Tattoo Supply has just released their highly-anticipate Rage Power Supply. This cutting edge tattoo power supply not only features top-of-the-line technology, but also includes a sleek, practical design. The Rage features a precision CNC machined and anodized aircraft aluminum silver frame and knob.

The Rage Power Supply is the first OLED display power supply in the industry. The OLED display features an efficient, crisp, and bright display screen. The Rage features a flush display interface for easy application of barrier film.

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The Rage Power Supply gives you the option to program up to four voltage presets. The preset buttons allow you to recall the voltage values for any four of your favorite tattoo machines. In addition, a built-in timer is included to assist artists with tracking tattoo session time.

The Rage Power Supply is specially designed and engineered to allow your tattoo machine to operate at their ultimate efficiency. The Rage provides consistent and smooth output power to your rotary or coil tattoo machines.

You have the option of choosing a touch screen model or a dial model. TATSoul is known to stand by their product. The Rage comes complete with 2 year warranty, so rest assure, these are built to last.

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Lyle Tuttle Tattoos on All 7 Continents

Anna Felicity Friedman                                                                FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 2/10/14

tattoohistorian.com

+1 773 307-2753

tattoohistorian@gmail.com

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Lyle Tuttle Tattoos on All 7 Continents

Becomes First Person to Accomplish This Feat

On January 21, 2014, 82-year-old tattoo legend Lyle Tuttle became the first person to

tattoo on all 7 continents. A long-standing “bucket list” item of his, this accomplishment

fulfilled a personal mission for Mr. Tuttle. He said of the endeavor: “Because I was lucky

to have the greatest time slot that any tattoo artist ever had in tattooing, it wound up

that I had tattooed on six continents. So I had an opportunity to tattoo on seven

continents. Well, I’m not out to break any records but why not do it, it’s there! Edmund

Hillary, they asked him why he climbed Mount Everest, and he said ‘because it was

there’.”

After a long trip to the tip of South America, he and project assistant/tattoo historian Dr.

Anna Felicity Friedman, flew across the Drake Passage on a 6-seat charter flight. Still

plagued by after-effects from a bout of frostbite acquired while serving in the Marines in

the Korean War, the trip posed a particular challenge for Mr. Tuttle. The two travelers

spent a full day touring, seeing—among the many wonders of the icy southern world—

glaciers, icebergs, penguins, seals, and whales—and experiencing what life is like for

those who live in Antarctica for extended periods of time. Then, late at night, Mr. Tuttle

set up his tattoo station in a scientist’s guesthouse at the Russian Bellingshausen Station

and tattooed his signature tattoo—his autograph—on Dr. Friedman’s leg, later adding

“ANTARCTICA 2014” when back in Punta Arenas, Chile. They were among only a

handful of tourists who have the privilege of sleeping on the continent each year.

Along the way, Mr. Tuttle acquired two new tattoos (he calls them “stickers on your

luggage”), the word “LIMA” during a stopover in Lima, Peru, and “ANTARCTICA 2014”

with a small penguin after returning to Patagonia. A natural prankster, he delighted in

surprising local tattoo artists along the way with his completely unexpected visits.

Mr. Tuttle, noted for his role in helping bring tattooing to a wider clientele in the 1960s

and 70s, began his career in 1949. He has tattooed such prominent clients as Janis

Joplin, Joan Baez, and the Allman Brothers and was featured on the cover of Rolling

Stone Magazine in 1970. Mostly retired from tattooing, Mr. Tuttle hosts an annual tattoo

convention every fall in St. Louis, travels widely educating about tattoo machines and

other topics, and maintains one of the world’s largest collections of tattoo-history

artifacts and ephemera.

You can read more about the project and view some images at: http://bit.ly/ltaproject

Media inquires: Please contact Lyle’s assistant on this project, Dr. Anna Felicity

Friedman, at tattoohistorian@gmail.com or +1 773 307-2753. High-resolution images

and video are available. Thumbnails on request.

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The Canvases Walk in the Door: A Brooklyn Tattoo Parlor Popular with foreigners

By Carroll Gardens

Source: http://www.nytimes.com

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The owner of Smith Street Tattoo Parlor described its style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in.

The brownstone-lined streets of Carroll Gardens may not seem like much of a tourist destination. But brand Brooklyn is ascendant these days, and foreigners come to idle at farm-to-table restaurants and browse in fanciful boutiques.And farther south, where affluence gives way to aluminum siding and Smith Street dead-ends under the din of the Gowanus Expressway, visitors come for a more permanent souvenir: authentic Brooklyn ink.

On a recent Thursday, Yossy Yoshino, 35, a tattoo artist from Japan, lay face down on a massage table at Smith Street Tattoo Parlour while Dan Santoro, 31, inscribed a pig in a bikini on his back (“three tops, one for each set of teats,” Mr. Santoro explained). The words “Weird World” floated above the pig’s head.

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Mr. Yoshino, a teardrop tattoo dripping from his eye, said he had traveled thousands of miles from his home in Okinawa to get a “New York tattoo.”

Just what makes a New York tattoo can be a bit difficult to pin down. The shop’s owner, Bert Krak, 35, described the parlor’s style as traditional American, with a bit of Japanese thrown in.

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Illegal tattoo artist who used a dirty toothbrush to clean his equipment is jailed after huge Alice in Wonderland etching leaves a woman’s back covered in scars

By: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

Professionals:  Thoughts on this??  Please comment…

Nicki

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  • Tony Newlands drank while working in unsanitary conditions in his kitchen
  • Court hears he used Old Spice stick deodorant to affix stencil transfer
  • Environmental health officials acted after complaint from disgruntled customer
  • She was left in agony after huge fairytale tattoo became infected
  • Newlands was jailed for four months and had £1,000 of tattoo tools seized

An unlicensed tattooist has been jailed after his botched Alice In Wonderland etching across a young woman’s back left her in agonising pain and scarred for life.

Tony Newlands worked in unsanitary conditions in the kitchen of his home in Carlisle, Cumbria, where a lack of sterilising equipment created a serious risk of infection, a court heard.

He improvised around a lack of suitable equipment by using a ‘dirty’ toothbrush to clean his tattooing tools and an Old Spice deodorant stick to apply stencil transfers to customers.

Newlands’ illegal enterprise hit the skids after an inept attempt at an Alice In Wonderland tattoo which spanned most the back of a young woman in her 20s.

After two sessions on the detailed design, the  woman was unable to bear the pain and asked him to stop. She fell sick when the etching got infected and was left with ugly scars.

At Carlisle Magistrates Court, Newlands admitted a single offence of failing to ensure his customers were not exposed to risk under health and safety law.

Clare Liddle, prosecuting for Carlisle City Council, described how Newlands’ victim contacted environmental health officials and told them that he had ‘wrecked her back’.

Neither the defendant, nor the property he was using in Ridley Road, Currock, were registered for tattoo work.

The woman revealed how she had paid up to £100 for two days of tattoo work.

‘The work was carried out in the kitchen of the property,’ said Mrs Liddle. ‘She described how during the tattoo, she sat on a kitchen stool and leant over the worktop.

‘There was a cat in the kitchen and the defendant was drinking. He also had a few cigarette breaks during the tattoo. He used an Old Spice deodorant stick to stick the transfer onto her back.

‘It’s likely that this deodorant stick was used on other customers, creating a risk of infection.’

The woman saw no cleaning equipment, though Newlands did use gloves and disposable needles, said Mrs Liddle.

After the second painful tattooing session, she added, the woman’s back became so badly infected the she could not sleep for a few days.

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Botched: The massive but ineptly drafted Alice In Wonderland tattoo – criticized by a legitimate tattoo artist as the worst he’d seen – which left this young woman scarred for life and in agony when it became infected.

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Both Donna Hastie, the environmental health officer who investigated the case, and legitimate local tattoo artist Colin Fell said the Alice in Wonderland tattoo was the worst they had seen.
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The Evolution of Tattooing on TV – As I See It

By Deb Yarian
http://www.eaglerivertattoo.com

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I grew up watching TV- I loved it!

I’m past middle age now, so I was a child when TV was still fairly young and I still remember when television was broadcast only in B & W. I also remember when there were only 7 channels (and this was in NYC), the three major networks, three local networks and the public broadcast network. They came on early in the morning, ran programs and commercials throughout the day – but ended sometime after midnight, culminating with a picture of a waving American flag, the playing of the national anthem and then dead air and static, literally static- till they resumed broadcasting in the morning.

When the weekly TV guide came out, I would plot my viewing for the days ahead- first searching for my favorite shows, then looking for any specials or movies I wanted to watch and then i’d adjust my schedule for time conflicts.
This continued, to a degree through my teens, when other interests like REAL LIFE got in the way of my television viewing habits.

Fast forward thirty- years… I’ve changed- tv viewing has changed.
I still enjoy watching a few series that I have set to record. I still love watching movies and can do so on any of the many movie viewing options available – in color, high def etc, and so goes the evolution of my tv watching.

When I first became aware of tattoos, as a teenager in the 70s, and started tattooing, I was also acutely aware of the absence of tattoos and tattooing on TV.
Tattooing was still an underground art then and tattoos just did not fit in to everyday, mainstream American life… there was little, if any, mention or presence of them on TV or in the movies with the exception of a couple of movies: The Illustrated Man,1969 and Tattoo, 1981 as well as an occasional documentary or the very rare appearance of a tattooer on TV.
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For Restless Pioneer of Modern Tattoo Art, a Life Beyond Ink

By David Gonzalez

Source: http://www.nytimes.com

Visitors to the cluttered studio inside Thom DeVita’s Victorian house marvel at the artwork that covers the walls, his drawing table, even his hands. The images reflect not just his interests, but his skills, which he honed as a tattoo artist on the Lower East Side for some 30 years; a storied era to aficionados. The accomplishment was all the more remarkable because it was illegal in New York City at the time.

Nowadays, it seems everybody has a tattoo. If there is someone to thank for the art’s increased acceptance and visibility, it might be Mr. DeVita. Every month, Chris Grosso brings admirers up to visit the old master, in Newburgh, the upstate town where he has lived since leaving the Lower East Side in the early 1990s.

“He is one of the founders of modern tattooing,” said Mr. Grosso, who befriended Mr. DeVita two years ago while filming a documentary about him. “It’s not what you see on reality television, but something that only he and seven other people in the 1960s started, from purely a love for the art form. He wasn’t from a sailor or biker background, where tattooing comes with the territory. They appreciated the great Japanese masters, the people from Samoa. Thom was at the forefront of that.”

Growing up in East Harlem, the son of Italian immigrants, Mr. DeVita did not set out to be an artist. After high school, he worked at various jobs, from factory hand to messenger. He recalled how his parents used to refer to some people as “bohemians,” and how he warmed to the idea.

“It seemed like a nice life to live, being with artists,” he said. “It didn’t seem like they went to work. Then I realized when I got to the Lower East Side, I was 30 years too late to be a bohemian. But I caught the tail end of the beatnik era and the beginning of the hippie era.”

His own entree into the art world was improvised, when a potential girlfriend asked him what he did.

“I had to be something, so I told her I was an artist,” he said. “So I became an artist. I had to show her I was an artist, so I started doing some artwork.”

He decided to become a tattoo artist when the city banned tattooing in 1961 (the ban was lifted in 1997). He figured business would be good, since the law drove out his competitors, and the police on the Lower East Side had more pressing concerns than outlaw skin art.

Mr. Grosso said that Mr. DeVita created new designs incorporating nontraditional elements, such as Pueblo Indian iconography and even the rose from the Lord & Taylor shopping bag. He said he admires him for his restless creativity, even if — at 81 years of age, with hands trembling from Parkinson’s disease — he no longer does many tattoos.

Instead, Mr. DeVita resorts to rubbings, stencils and stamps, making montages of old tattoo designs on recycled wooden crates, paper, cutting boards and even ancient ledgers. He signs them with his surname, rendered in snakelike letters that would be the envy of any graffiti writer.

“He paints on everything,” Mr. Grosso said. “Maybe if he had seen graffiti he would have been a tagger. He just doesn’t stop. It has to be a compulsion.”

Mr. Grosso can understand. After making a documentary on Mr. DeVita, he set up a website to sell his work. Now he visits him monthly, to give him cash from the sales and pick up new work to ship. He is often accompanied by a friend or two who might want to learn about tattoo history firsthand, like Fernando Lions, a tattoo artist from Brooklyn who recently accompanied him on a trek.

The two young men peppered Mr. DeVita with questions, and asked to see some classic designs or snapshots from his time on the Lower East Side. Depending on his mood, he may or may not comply; pictures he had told Mr. Grasso never existed magically appeared during this visit. At one point, Mr. DeVita took out some panoramas he had painted in bold, black brush strokes.

“These are beautiful,” Mr. Lions said quietly.

“You know how they’re done?” Mr. DeVita asked. “The paper is scrap I cut off bigger pieces. I paint on them with whatever is left in the ink pot.”

Before they are sent off to customers, Mr. DeVita packs a slip that reads: “Any Imperfections Will Add to Its Beauty.” He first saw the phrase when he bought a china closet, and liked it so much he appropriated it.

“All my art is imperfection,” he said. “I dwell on imperfection. I’m constantly pulling things out of the fire.”


Dali’s Skull Illusion Still Inspires

Source: http://www.illusion.scene360.com

Warning: This article contains images with nudity. Viewer discretion is advised.

rick genest, zombie boy for rebell magazine, skull

A skull formed by seven nude women is an optical illusion by Salvador Dali, who first made a gouache painting of it—titled “InVoluptas Mors,” translating to a desirable death. In 1951, he adapted the work to a live photo shoot with Latvia photographerPhilippe Halsman, as shown in the pictures below.

This visual has maintained popularity throughout the years—it has been tattooed on people’s bodies, printed on t-shirts, and artists have re-created it for film posters and magazine covers.

In voluptate mors, dali, halsan, 1951

in voluptas mor, dali, halsman, skull, women

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Off The Map Presents a 3 Day Webinar Extravaganza

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Recent years have seen huge debates between tattooers about whether modern technology adds value to tattooing. Are all new products improvements or are we losing vital artistic skills?

Therefore, it is so refreshing to see technology used in such a way that no one can deny that it adds value to tattooing. An age old skill meets the height of modern technology.

The use of webinars allows you, as an artist, to learn from fellow tattooers without the need to leave the comfort of your own home. It’s a win/win situation where you do not need to close your studio for days and bear the cost of extensive travelling; artists that you know and respect are made available to you without the need to leave the house.

Off the Map are pleased to offer you the opportunity to buy one of a limited number of places available for a three day webinar extravaganza. So, what will you get over the three days?

It all kicks off on February 9th  (is there a start time?) with a webcast that is live and free (oh yeah, free!) to the public at  HYPERLINK “http://www.tattooNOWTV.com/www.tattooNOWTV.com. This is not about indepth technical details of tattooing but will cover a variety of issues that are faced by Jeff Gogue and Guy Aitchison when they set about designing and executing large tattoos. It will be a collaboration, seeing these artists working on a sleeve project. Watch as they fuse together traditional Japanese elements alongside cutting-edge techniques. Not only will you be able to get a rare glimpse inside this high-energy creative process but you can ask questions, which will be answered during the seminar.

It doesn’t get more up close and personal than this!

On February 10th at noon (Pacific Standard Time – USA & Canada), the king of bio organic tattooing, Guy Aitchison, brings you “Structure: Optimizing Your Use Of Value And Color”. 

Probably more so today, than ever before in the history of tattooing artists are striving to make their tattoos clearer, stronger and more easily readable. Again this is an issue brought to the fore by the advances in inks and the popularity of tattoos in modern society.

In this webinar Guy will demonstrate how you can use design to your advantage and how your execution of a tattoo can increase the graphic contrast in the final piece.

He will start with the layout and use of stencils, and follow this with a live tattoo  demonstration, focusing on the subject of contrast. This webinar will allow you access to Guy’s experiences and knowledge, and a personal insight into how he strengthens his work and how you can strengthen yours. There is an interactive element within this process, in that student questions will be answered during the webinar.

Then on February 11th at noon (Pacific Standard Time – USA & Canada), world famous tattooer: Jeff Gogue brings you “Size doesn’t matter… Hand tattoo”

When asked why the title of this webinar, Jeff said “Whether I am laying out a full back piece, a sleeve, a leg, a head or a hand, I focus on the entire “canvas”. Whatever it may be.”



During the webinar he will share how he uses those proven tools of design and flow   to create a successful piece of art. He will explain how he feels that sometimes as artists we overlook the basics in our attempts to produce something new and exciting.  How often have we heard about tattoos being done “for the photo”. Again that modern technology of social media means that tattoos are “out there” within minutes of their conclusion and this has become the excitement we crave.

Jeff will talk to you about going back to basics, whatever size piece you are doing; and concentrate on those fundamentals of doing what you know works and to get good at that. He believes that the excitement you seek will follow, in other ways. Jeff will share with you his thoughts about transition, size, placement, and those other key elements that result in an intriguing, pleasing and above all, insightful tattoo.

To demonstrate to you all how he puts these personal tattooing values into practise Jeff will be tattooing Guy Aitchison’s hand. Whilst doing this he will explain his thought processes as the tattoo progresses and he will also be answering your questions from the chat room.

So if you are looking for that training and education opportunity that will add value to your business for a mere $300.00 and greatly add a deeper understanding of creating a wonderful tattoo, then more details can be found at : http://www.tattooeducation.com/Event-and-Seminar_Tickets/item3865.html
What are you waiting for, come join us on a journey of dermal discovery!

Surgeon Takes Pains to Preserve Tattoos When He Fixes Spines

By Mitch Dudek

Source: http://www.suntimes.com

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Dr. Tyler Koski, 40, a surgeon and co-director of the Northwestern Medicine Spine Center talks about how he takes extra time in the operating room to preserve the tattoos of patients affected by surgery. | Mitch Dudek/Sun-Times

Occasionally mixed among the family photos on Dr. Tyler Koski’s cellphone are pictures of back tattoos.

Koski, a surgeon, takes pains to preserve patients’ tattoos when he fixes their spines.

He’ll slice the inked skin, spend hours tinkering with a spine, and then study the picture the way someone working on a jigsaw puzzle looks at the box.

“It’s easy if the tattoo is letters or words, but when it’s a picture, it gets trickier,” said Koski, 40, co-director of the Northwestern Medicine Spine Center.

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Rob Crane, 48, had scoliosis and wore a back brace during much of his childhood growing up in Rogers Park. He was able to avoid surgery by staying in shape. But 15 months ago, the pain became too severe, and he underwent surgery to straighten his spine. His surgeon, Dr. Tyler Koski, took care to preserve the tattoo on his back. | Mitch Dudek/Sun-Times

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Rob Crane, a partner in Napleton’s Northwestern auto dealership, shows off the tattoo on his back, which Dr. Tyler Koski carefully preserved after fixing Crane’s spine. Asked if he had worried about the tattoo before the surgery, Crane said he was more worried about whether he’d be able to walk again. | Photo courtesy of Rob Crane



After concentrating for hours while standing on their feet, many surgeons will use staples — a quicker, easier option and less tattoo-friendly way to close a wound.

But Koski will spend an extra 45 minutes carefully stitching tattooed skin, even if a patient tells him not to “worry about making my tattoo look good.”

“It’s an art form like anything else. And people are proud of them and they are meant to be permanent,” said Koski, who doesn’t have any tattoos.
(more…)


Joe Swanson with London Tattooer Mil Martinez


The Must-See: Mike Giant’s “Modern Hieroglyphics” Exhibition @ Fecal Face Gallery

By Jack Smylie

Source: slamxhype.com

OG graffiti writer/tattoo artist Mike Giant is set to open a new solo show in San Francisco this February.

The exhibition is entitled Modern Hieroglyphics and is hosted by Fecal Face Gallery. You’ll see a series of new works on paper that mix tattoo art, cultural symbols, logos and written motifs, as well as some custom screen-printed pieces.

The thing opens on February 7th, visit Fecal Face’s website and don’t miss out if you’re in the area.

RELATED: MIKE GIANT DISCUSSES GRAFFITI CULTURE AND HIS NEW BOOK, ‘ETERNAL’


Durb Morrison discusses RedTree Tattoo Gallery, Arizona, and leaving Ohio

By Kevin Miller

Source: http://www.tattoosnob.com

Earlier this week, Durb Morrison announced on Instagram that RedTree Tattoo Gallery would be opening a second location in Phoenix, Arizona. In the same announcement, Durb officially stated he would be relocating to Phoenix. This is obviously a huge announcement, as Durb is a leader in the Ohio tattoo scene and the tattoo industry as a whole.

To find out more about this news, we caught up with Durb Morrison and asked him a couple questions.

Red Tree Tattoo

Tattoo Snob: Let’s start off with the basics Where is original location of Red Tree Tattoo, and when did it open?

Durb Morrison: The RedTree Tattoo Gallery opened in 2012 at in Italian Village connected to the Short North Arts District at 1002 N. 4th St. in Columbus, Ohio

TS: Who currently works at the Ohio location?

DM: The artists at RedTree in Columbus are myself, Adam FranceGunnarKevin StressRich Cook, and Rusty Dornhecker.

TS: The shop is a little different than your average tattoo shop, can you tell us a little about that and why you chose to have it that way? 
(more…)


New Service Uses Artist’s Tattoo Photo to Create One of a Kind Custom Phone or Tablet Cases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Adam Anderson
TATTCase
adam@tattcase.com

Long Beach, CA, December 20th, 2013 — TATTCase has just launched a IndieGoGo campaign that aims to put your tattoo onto your smartphone or tablet.

The TATTCase process goes far beyond simply taking a photo of a tattoo and printing it onto a generic case.  Using a photo of your tattoo, each case is individually transformed into high quality case by our team of graphic designers.

Here’s what our project will create;

Amazing Reproductions - The contrast between skin and ink makes it impossible to create a high-quality case with only a photo.  We have a team of top-notch designers who will take your photo and transform it into a case of the quality you would expect.
Sleek design - Our cases offer a custom fit, snap-on design with a raised bezel that feels exquisite to the touch.  They provide good all around protection, maintain ease of access to all of your device ports, and protect the screen when your device is face down, so you can show off your unique case without worry.
Easy as can be -  All that is needed to get a TattCase is a photo of a tattoo and your approval of the pre-production work.  After that, it will be delivered right to your front door.

Anyone interested in obtaining a TattCase can visit http://IndieGoGo.com/TattCase

About TattCase

Our mission is to put your tattoo on your case.  Learn more at;
TattCase.com
facebook.com/Tatt.Case
#TattCase (twitter)tattcase-infographic


Local Tattoo Artists Host Lansing Fundraiser

By Juliana Moxley/The State News

Source: http://www.health.einnews.com

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Local Lansing tattoo artists collaborated on Sunday evening for Artonica, an event meant to benefit the Greater Lansing Food Bank and Capital Area Humane Society.

But these artists weren’t focused on their typical work. Rather than creating artwork on skin, the artists rotated around 10 different canvases every 20 minutes and drew whatever came to mind with charcoal.

The pieces were sold at an auction later in the evening.

Monica and Greg Drake started Artonica three years ago as a way to give back to local charities.

Greg said the artists don’t get paid for the work because the night was just about giving back to charity.

The tattoo artists at the event were hand-picked by Greg for demonstrating exceptional creative skills.

“We look for custom shops,” Monica Drake said. “We look for artists that have the ability to actually be able to draw.”

The Drakes partner together to run Local Tattoo & Laser Co. in Lansing, a shop that only uses vegan ink for its creations.

The artists rotate to different canvases for a total of about two hours and once the artwork is complete, it gets framed and auctioned off to the crowd. Proceeds from the auction go towards the Greater Lansing Food Bank and Capital Area Humane Society.

Photographer Michele Hoffman heard of Artonica and the praise its artists received for their skills, so she came to the event in the hopes of finding artists that she could use for her own photography project.

VanGogh Tattoos artist Ian Wallace was participating in Artonica this year for the first time. Greg Drake got in contact with Wallace and invited him to the event.

“I’ve done a couple art fusions in the past with Greg,” Wallace said. “This is my first art fusion at Artonica.”

The artists at Artonica come recommended and display a strong passion for their work.

“I’ve always loved doing art and the idea of putting your art on somebody is probably one of the best things in the world that could possibly happen for me,” Wallace said. “You are leaving your mark on somebody and it’s going to last forever.”


Nephews Skateshop + Gallery Presents Wild And Free January 25, 2014

WildAndFree-01.25.2014

Port Monmouth, NJ – January 17, 2013 Nephews Skate Shop + Gallery will be hosting WILD AND FREE, a group artist exhibit on Saturday, January 25, 2014 from 6pm to 10pm. The exhibit has been guest curated by Little Chris Smith. WILD AND FREE will feature all original works of local tattoo artists Erik Schmidt, Little Chris Smith, Pete Pederson, Chuck Ordino, and Bryan Keinlen. Nephews will be opening up their doors to the public to host an evening of inspiration, conversation and enjoyment.

Erik Schmidt – “Erik has been tattooing in Neptune for several years after ‘doing time’ in Asbury Tattoo. He learned to tattoo under the guidance of Patrick Dean and Dave Shoemaker, following proudly in the tradition of those before him. His focus is clean, solid methodical tattooing, just like his mentors.”

PeteP ECS

Little Chris Smith – “Little Christopher Smith hails from Sandy Hook, New Jersey.  He enjoys a radical lunch, surfing hella waves, skateboarding with buds, and entertaining hot chicks.  You will usually find his best girl, Leche (his baby dog), at his side when he is not tattooing at Neptune Tattooville, where he works for the most gnarly awesome bosses Patrick Dean and Dave Shoemaker.  Little Chris, or LC as his friends call him, prides himself on his ability to get wild and loves his mother like all radical dudes do.

Pete Pedersen – “Pete has taken the long road at achieving his tattoo skills. His background in art of all mediums has proven to be vital in his development as a tattooer and as an artist. Working at print shops, screen printing factories, and in the fields of photography and graphic design all eventually lead to his discovery and love for tattooing. After spending much of the late 1990s loitering around Jersey Shore tattoo shops, Pete finally landed a job at a local shop as a body piercer. During his time working as a piercer, he started to acquire much tattoo knowledge under the guidance of Jim Weiss (now at Black Panther Tattoo). An opportunity to fulfill another dream of playing music fell in Pete’s lap right around the same time and he took a brief break from the tattoo world to peruse his passion in music, all the while still working as an artist. After a few years on the road, Pete decided he needed to get back to his original passion of becoming a tattooer. His chance came in the way of a job working as the shop manager of Neptune Tattooville complete with an apprenticeship. There he learned to tattoo under the guidance of Patrick Dean and Dave Shoemaker, following proudly in the tradition of all those before him.”

CSO ChrisSmith

Chuck Ordino – “Chuck got his start in this shady business by apprenticing with Vinny Kapelewski, a Neptune native like himself, at Sinister Ink (now known as Revolver Tattoo) in New Brunswick.  Upon completing his apprenticeship, he went on to work with Vinny and Joshua Disotell at Broken Heart Tattoo in Keyport for 5 good years before settling in at Neptune Tattoo in April of 2010. When he’s not watching the Cooking Channel, listening to sludgy doom metal or teaching his son Lucas how to “color inside the lines”, he is constantly woodshedding; trying to simplify and refine his work, and strives to apply a clean, solid tattoo.”

Bryan Keinlen - “Back in high school some friends and I started a punk band. Being the artist I naturally took on the task of inventing what would be our logo, and then went on to design all of our record covers, T-shirts and whatever other merchandise I could think up. More than 20 years of the Bouncing Souls has gone by like a million lifetimes and yet seemingly in the blink of an eye. Creating music and art has remained my means of expression all throughout. When not busy with the band, I tattoo at Neptune Tattooville in Neptune NJ.”

Nephews Skateshop + Gallery is located at 183 Main Street, Port Monmouth, NJ 07758.

For additional information, please call 732-495-0750 or email nephewsskate@gmail.com.

Bryan


Stick And Poke Tattoo Kits

Marisa Kakoulas

http://www.needlesandsins.com

stick and poke tattoo kit.jpg

Hand-poked tattoos are experiencing a Renaissance, with stellar professional tattooers reviving the ancient methods of body adornment. Employing techniques passed down from generations, much of hand tattooing comes with strict tradition and sacred rituals. The question is should it come in a box?

When SF tattooist Shannon Archuleta sent me the link to the Stick & Poke Tattoo Kit, we both said that our initial reaction was Oooh nooo. Then there’s the rationalization reaction: people have always been sticking and poking themselves, so they might as well be safe. This rationalization is how the kit is touted.

However, upon further reading of the site — particularly the “Open letter to the precious tattoo artist” on the blog portion — the disdain for the craft, the hygiene 101 info and bad advice on what to do with the dirty needles, and also the goal of putting the kits in stores around the world, well, it made Shannon and I revert to our original reaction: this is not a good thing.

To read more of this article, go to: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/01/stick-and-poke-tattoo-kits.html


Fineline Tattoo in the East Village, the Longest Continually Running Tattoo Shop in Manhattan

By Allison B. Siegel

Source: http://www.untappedcities.com

fineline

Fineline Tattoo opened in 1976 during the New York City ban on tattooing and is considered the longest continually running tattoo shop in Manhattan. It’s located on 1st Street and First Avenue in the East Village. Previously, Mike Bakaty, the founder and owner, operated underground for 36 years in secret back rooms and loft apartments. With the walls adorned with Bakaty’s original flash art, Fineline is definitely near and dear to our skin and to the history of NYC.

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We interviewed Bakaty and asked him about tattooing and New York City:

When did you first fall in love with tattooing?

I’m still falling in love with tattooing. I got interested back in ’74 when I went to get some work covered up…I got more interested in ’75…and then by 1976 my interest was such that I started tattooing myself.

And you didn’t care that tattooing was illegal at the time in NY?

Hell yeah, I cared. Every time the phone rang I jumped thinking it was the cops looking to bust me. After 21 years eventually I got over jumping at the phone.

How do you feel at the Bowery now and all the changes going on?

Well, you know, it’s not the Bowery I lived on for 34 years, you know? Don’t know how I feel about the changes. When they first built the Whole Foods down here I thought who the hell is gonna come down here and buy food? We tried to save the building we lived in (McGurk’s Suicide Hall). I lived there for 34 years. Check out more on McGurk’s.

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What’s your opinion on Mildred Hull?

Millie Hull…well she was one of the first female tattooers I ever heard of. There’s a picture of her right there (points to picture on the wall).

This piece has her in it and some other legends like Charlie Wagner.

Well, it was us (Fineline) that brought tattooing back to the Bowery and the fact of the matter is I was totally blind to the fact that the Bowery had such tattoo history. I read somewhere the first heavily tattooed person exhibition was around 1876 right across from 295 (Bowery) where we lived…

Do you call this a parlor or a shop?

It’s a studio. I don’t see a parlor anywhere in here.

Can I ask how old you are? 

Well, I’m 77.

G-d Bless you, man! You don’t look a day over 60.

Well, thank you, I just passed the big 77. If I knew I was gonna get this old I’d have taken better care of myself (laughter).

You can read the expanded original version of the interview on Bowery Boogie. Get in touch with the author @RebelKnow or contact her at BoweryBoogie.com.


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