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How Rinsecup Cleanup Came About

By Dan Mcnab

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I’m a tattoo artist in the city of Huntington Beach, Ca. I own and work at The Tattoo Gallery with four of my very close friends. After years and years of leaking trash bags, I decided one day to put an end to it once and for all and created RinseCup CleanUp.

When I designed this product I made sure it is the best that exists and can not get any better. Also, it’s non-toxic because our trash gets put into landfills and that would only hurt the environment. I believe as a whole, us humans do enough of that! Disposing of our rinse cups and ink caps this way is the safest method and eliminates cross-contamination in our trade due to the contaminated liquids we produce.

Once in the landfill, RinseCup CleanUp slowly releases the water and improves soil conditions through aeration. It’s less expensive than using paper towels and safer than dumping it down a sink. When that method is used more toxic chemicals are needed to clean the area it was dumped in, which leads to poisoning our environment even more.

Now we are in many countries and the response is amazing. So much support from this trade! The only advertising I have done is thru IG. It’s spreading like wildfire and I’m excited to see where it goes from here. It’s only been about 6 months since I released it for sale!

For more information about Rinsecup Cleanup, email:
Rinsecup@yahoo.com


Tattoo Age: Freddy Corbin Part 1

By Vice


10 Life Lessons People with Tattoos Can Teach You

By Kayla Matthews

www.lifehack.org

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1.  Your standards are the only ones that matter

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Of course not everyone will think that your new chest piece is as gorgeous as you do, but why should that matter?

As long as you love the way it looks and feel great about yourself because of it, those stares on the street are laughable.

2. First impressions aren’t always right

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Anyone with tattoos or a heavily tattooed friend can tell you this life lesson is true. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve watched perfectly nice, loving, and intelligent people get judged because of their ink.

Having tattoos and knowing people with tattoos teaches you to not place value on appearances and, instead, spend more time getting to know new people.

3. Pain is temporary

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This, for sure, is something every tattoo-ee can attest to. Regardless of your pain tolerance, you’re bound to encounter one tattoo that hurts like a B. But making it through a painful tattooing experience just makes you more proud of the end result.

Sometimes we forget that painful things can lead to great things, but I think tattoos are a fabulous reminder of that.

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*NEW* Photos Added To The Gallery

Tattoos by Chris Stuart

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Ace Custom Tattoo, Charlotte, NC

www.chrisstuarttattooing.com

www.facebook/chrisstuarttattooing.com


Marked up | Episode 1

By Skeetv

Skee. TV presents Marked Up Episode 1 featuring pro BMX rider Rick Thorne & Celebrity tattoo artist Danny Balena.  Marked Up is a new look into the culture and lifestyle of the art of tattoos.  In this series we will talk to celebs, tattoo artists and people of all ages and aspects of life to see what their tattoos mean, the story of why and why not to get them and how the culture has evolved thus far.


Athletes’ Tattoo Artists File Copyright Suits, Leaving Indelible Mark

By Jacob Gersham

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Carlos Condit, who has a lion tattoo on his rib cage, gives a knee to Nick Diaz. Associated Press

Randy Harris worries that lawyers are leaving a stain on the tattoo world.

A court tattooist to basketball royalty, Mr. Harris says he has inked dozens of NBA players, drawing everything from a giant tree on Dallas Mavericks guard Monta Ellis, to a beady-eyed owl on Washington Wizards point guard John Wall, to a basketball-toting angel on Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant.

Recently, he has found himself shaking his head at the litigious direction of his image-conscious occupation as the question of who owns a tattoo has become a source of tension.

To him, it’s simple: “Once they paid for the tattoos, man, they paid for it,” he said from his shop south of Atlanta.

Other tattooists say the issue isn’t that clear, especially in the case of sports videogames, which digitally re-create not just the bodies of athletes, but often their body art as well.

Phoenix-based tattoo artist Chris Escobedo took an intellectual property rights training course and in 2012 sued now-bankrupt videogame developer THQ Inc. over a mixed-martial arts game in which one of his tattoos—a large, scowling lion on the right rib cage of Ultimate Fighting Championship star Carlos Condit—makes a cameo appearance.

Last year he settled the lawsuit for an undisclosed sum, he said.

“They’re doing it without consulting the original artists, and that’s what makes it illegal,” he said. “I’m the little guy in this situation.”

Such lawsuits have left a mark. When videogame giant EA Sports, a brand of Electronic Arts Inc., EA +0.11% developed its own fighting game featuring Mr. Condit, which will be released this week, it left out the lion, causing gamers to growl. Electronic Arts declined to comment.

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STUNNING TATTOOED CERAMIC LADIES: WE INTERVIEWED THE ARTIST BEHIND THEM

By Indigo del Castillo

www.lostateminor.com

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Sculptor Jessica Harrison has forever changed how we see Victorian-era ceramic figures with her works involving ladies in fancy dresses sporting badass tattoos or their own blood and guts. In this exclusive interview, she talks more about her roots as an artist and her unique take on ceramics. [read our original posts about her sculptures here and here]

How did you discover your passion for sculpture?
When I was little I wanted to work in animation – there were quite a few great children’s tv programs on in the 80’s that were made with 3D models and I decided quite early on it looked like the best job in the world to mess around with clay all day.

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Let’s talk about your grotesque ceramic ladies with severed heads and misplaced body parts. Where did you get the inspiration for this collection? What was the message you were trying to convey here?
That series is called ‘Broken’ as the pieces are made using found ceramics that I have quite literally taken a hammer and chisel to.They present an impossibly fair-skinned ‘perfect’ woman and my attraction to these works was precisely because of this image they portray of the female body – my aim was to counter it and present its opposite within itself.

This was simple to do, by breaking apart the hollow cast pieces and ‘revealing’ the interior, a standard formula in Western knowledge for making discoveries about the body. The female interior is a space still laced with taboo in a way that the male interior is not, and for me this gender bias of what is most often an invisible space in our everyday lives was a fascinating and important one to address. This series, like my other works in stone, ceramics, silicone and ink comes from exploring shared ideas about the body, unraveling shared experiences of different spaces, textures and shapes.

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Do you have any memorable reactions and responses regarding the macabre ceramics?
Not really, the pieces from the ‘Broken’ series are very bland to me before I break them. I think they make more sense in their altered form.

Seeing as you’ve been into sculpture all your artistic life, how difficult was it to move into tattoo art in your series about the Victorian-era ladies with tattoos?
It wasn’t difficult as it is not something different. I’m using the tattoo in this series to explore the skin space rather than creating any tattoo art itself, which is a completely different thing. Tattooing is not a painting or a drawing onto a static plane, it is incredibly sculptural, literally threading ink into a moving surface, one that has no flat surfaces.

So although the pieces are called ‘Painted Ladies’ in reference to the old term for a tattooed woman, they in fact draw from something incredibly sculptural and active in space, the skin.

The tattoo imagery I have used is all from war-time source imagery, to recall a time before the popularity boom of the tattoo when it may be pointed more towards a particular kind of harsher life. The idea was to present opposing outer layers, contrasting skins, where masculine illustrations are intertwined with overtly over-idealized feminine costume. The viewer is presented with the question of what we are supposed to consider beautiful, which costume to believe.

How long did it take you to finish a piece?
A long time, that’s why there are only a few, and why there are unlikely to be any more!

Do you have anything you’re currently working on that we should look out for?
I have an exhibition opening at Jupiter Artland in Edinburgh this July. It’s going to be very pink…

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*NEW* Photos Added To The Gallery

Tattoos by Victor Policheri

www.viptattoo.com

Heidi Hay Tattoo

Gothenburg, Sweden

IG: @viptattoo

Chef Jorn left sleeve DDLM Tommy right sleeve lg


 

 

 

 

 


Your Bed is Your New Tattoo’s Worst Enemy!

By Durb

 

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Having tattooed for the last 25 years, I’ve seen my fair share of tattoos that have healed badly due to the client simply sleeping in their bed. Usually these tattoos have incurred most of the damage, infection and hard healing from when the client sleeps with their fresh, new tattoo with unseen dangerous elements lurking in their bed. Sleeping is definitely one of the greatest moments during a new tattoo collector’s day to do the most damage to their new artwork. When people sleep, they are for the most part completely unaware of pain or minor discomforts, allowing them to be completely unaware of their new tattoo sticking to sheets, seeping onto the sheets and exposing their skin to possible other irritations to the new tattoo. Some of the most common issues while sleeping with a new tattoo is simply sticking to bedsheets, but it’s what’s on those bedsheets that matters during the healing process.

Sleep has a profound effect on our mental, emotional and physical well being! Sleep is the time the body can undergo repair and detoxification, although it can also be a determining factor in healing up well or not so well. Poor sleep patterns are linked to poor health and slow healing. Those who sleep less than six hours a night have a shorter life expectancy than those who sleep longer and naturally tend to heal slower. Getting enough sleep can also help resist infection, as some studies of healthy young adults have shown that moderate amounts of sleep deprivation reduce the levels of white blood cells which form part of the body’s defense system, preventing the tattoo from healing quickly.

There are many dangers to a new tattoo that your bed presents nightly. On average, most people don’t wash their bed sheets and pillows often enough, providing the perfect environment for dead skin cells to breed, potential infection or cellulitis to begin in a fresh tattoo. Another aspect is that most people don’t consistently shower or wash their hair before they go to bed, possibly having sweat or having been exposed to multiple situations during the day. People also can have their pets or animals sleeping next to them every night which undoubtedly brings animal fur, dander and the often overlooked feces that are on animal paws from the ground or backyard in general, which is simply horrible news for a fresh tattoo. Animal fur and dander can cause cellulitis which in worse than just a mild infection. Dander is an informal term for a material shed from the body of humans and animals, similar to dandruff. It is composed of skin cells which can be a major cause of allergies and skin infections in humans. Cellulitis is a common skin infection that happens when bacteria spread through the skin to deeper tissues. It is caused by bacteria, most often strep or staph and a cellulitis infected area will be warm, red, swollen, and tender and usually needs extra attention and antibiotics to help the tattoo heal properly. Animal and human dander are typically the biggest problems with cellulitis or skin infections in fresh tattoos.

Some tips to help avoid an infection in your new tattoo while sleeping in your bed is to first be sure to wash your sheets before you get any new tattoo. Always wash your tattoo off before bed and immediately when you awake, this will help eliminate any infectious materials that you’ve collected on your skin throughout the day before resting for 6-8 hours. Covering your new tattoo with a breathable, non-stick wrapping right before you lay down is an excellent way to help prevent infection from the beginning, it not only protects your new tattoo from sticking to your clothing or bed sheets, it also creates a barrier between you and your bed and helps keep potentially dangerous elements in the bed off of the new tattoo while the pores in the new tattoo seal up and stop seeping plasma. Remember to always wash the tattoo off and allow it dry with no lotion, etc before wrapping it at night. Wearing a protective piece of loose, breathable clothing also helps create another barrier between your new tattoo and infectious bed elements. Be sure to sleep on the non-tattooed side of your body, A pillow works great to adjust and hold your body part in a position that’s comfortable. Try to keep the body part somewhat elevated above the heart to reduce pressure and swelling on the new tattoo. Always wake up, remove wrapping and wash immediately with anti-bacterial foam wash when you wake up.

The most crucial time for a tattoo to begin the healing process is within the first five days, these are the days when a new tattoo is at the highest risk for an infection from everyday situations. After the first few days of wrapping or being very clean and safe while sleeping with your new tattoo, you can go about your normal routine of antibacterial soap, bactine, non-scented lotions or ointments depending on how you normally heal your tattoos. I personally like to mist my new tattoo with Bactine, it helps the body to heal while it’s trying to do two things. One is to fight any oncoming infection, the second thing is to simply heal and repair the tissue. The Bactine simply reduces your bodies need to dedicate white blood cells to fight infection and allows it to focus more on actually healing. Remember, the first days of how you take care of your new tattoo will determine the healing process and ultimately it’s final look!

 


The Last Kalinga Tattoo Artist

Photo and Caption by Michal Duchek

www.travel.nationalgeographic.com
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A fascinating culture of the Igorot people brought me and my girlfriend to Kalinga. Head-hunting ceased decades ago, however, the motifs of Kalinga tattoos and the way they are being tattoed remains the same (charcoal and an orange thorn). We decided to visit this beautiful tribeswoman who is the last Kalinga tattoo artist. After a few days, long hours spent on buses and jeepneys, we were lucky to find a local guide Francis who brought us to Buscalan. We were overwhelmed how hospitable and friendly she is. Her natural beauty and her tattoo tempted me to ask her for a pose outside her dwelling.

Location: Buscalan village, Kalinga, North Luzon, Philippines


CALAVERA X ARTIST KIM SAIGH SWIMWEAR TO BENEFIT KEEP A BREAST

By Kailee Bradstreet

http://business.transworld.net/150141/news/calavera-x-artist-kim-saigh-swimwear-benefit-keep-breast/

Calavera x Kim Saigh x Keep A Breast

On Tuesday June 3, surf inspired swimwear label Calavera will show their support for young women from all walks of life by launching a limited edition tattoo print swimwear collection, designed by renowned artist Kim Saigh of television show LA Ink. For each suit sold, 50% of proceeds will be donated to The Keep A Breast Foundation in an effort to raise substantial funds to support the foundation’s educational recourses and community outreach.

eigQ9Rzqt3cZJa1Z6FEHuPMS7gk0wakbD5IGhSUT2gA-600x600Two styles of the limited edition print will be available online at Urban Outfitter in the retailer’s fitness and outdoor apparel division, as well as Without Walls, and the Calavera website. To launch the collection, Calavera will host a cocktail event and film screening at creative design agency space, Nouvelle Vague (701 Venice Boulevard, Venice, CA) on Tuesday, June 3rd, from 6pm to 8pm.

The campaign focuses on the concept that “every woman’s body is a work of art,” and to relay that idea, Calavera has created a short video filmed by renowned photographer Alberto Guglielmi portraying the story behind the limited edition tulip print.

PRESS RELEASE – Venice, California, Tuesday May 20, 2014 — Surf-inspired women’s active swimwear brand Calavera is set to launch a collection of limited edition tattoo print suits, designed by renowned artist Kim Saigh of television series LA Ink. For each suit sold, 50% of profits will directly benefit the Keep A Breast Foundation, supporting their mission of breast cancer eradication by educating young people about prevention, early detection, and cancer-causing toxins.

In order to support Keep A Breast, Calavera Founder Anna Jerstrom recruited the talents of renowned tattoo artist Kim Saigh; the result is a feminine and iconic floral print, inspired by the significance of this charitable partnership. In the lead up to the launch, Anna showed her commitment and passion for the program, by having Kim Saigh tattoo the signature print on her torso.

The pink, black and grey tulip motif will be available in two styles; Calavera’s best selling “Siren” bikini top (USD $65) and the one-piece “Leotard” suit (USD $126). From June 3rd, both styles will be available for sale online via the Urban Outfitter’s fitness and outdoor apparel division, Without Walls (withoutwalls.com) and the Calavera website (calaveraswimwear.com).

“Regardless of size, shape or scars, every woman’s body is a work of art. My hope is that women will wear these swimsuits with a sense of empowerment, beauty and strength,” says Calavera Founder Anna Jerstrom.

Calavera also joined forces with renowned photographer Alberto Guglielmi, to produce a short film that visually portrays the story behind the limited edition print; from being tattooed on Calavera’s founder, being body painted on to the chest cast of a breast cancer survivor, and finally being created into a one-piece swimsuit, worn by actress and avid surfer Tanna Frederick. Professional longboarder and esteemed photographer, Kassia Meador concludes the video with an important message reading, “every woman’s body is a work of art.”

About the launch event: To launch the collection, Calavera will host a cocktail event and film screening at creative design agency space, Nouvelle Vague (701 Venice Boulevard, Venice, CA) on Tuesday, June 3rd, from 6pm to 8pm. Limited edition temporary tattoos of the Kim Saigh print will be applied to guests and the short video produced by Alberto Guglielmi screened for the first time. A customized piece of breast cast art, molded from the survivor featured in the video (casted by Shaney Jo Darden and painted by Kim Saigh) will be available via silent auction. Breast cast art is an ongoing initiative developed by Keep A Breast; taking formation plaster casts of women’s chests, and developing them into customized works of art. DJ MisterG will be playing the night’s tunes, while refreshments will be supplied by Vita Coco and Bon Affair spritzers. A “Cirque Du Soleil” aerial performer Sarah Moser will welcome guests, performing tricks in the Calavera leotard suit.

This is the latest in an ongoing collaboration between Calavera and Keep A Breast. In September 2013, Calavera hosted a “Surfing for Survivors” event at Santa Monica beach, throughout which Keep A Breast cancer survivors took to the waves, with the same vigour and bravery they used to manage their illness.

Shaney Jo Darden, KAB Founder says of the partnership, “Calavera and The Keep A Breast Foundation are two innately aligned brands, brought together by their similar missions to inspire and support young women. I hope this tattoo print suit will be worn as a reminder for women to stay active, get educated, and be empowered.”

About Calavera:

Started by Swedish investment banker-turned-surf obsessed swimwear designer Anna Jerstrom, Calavera is a technically driven, stylish triumph. Built for riding Kauai’s curls, beachside yoga in Bali, sunning in Santorini and everything in between, these bathing suits don’t budge. In creating Calavera, Jerstrom has applied design innovations to fill a large gap in the marketplace: performance swimwear for women that can handle the most rigorous environments yet is feminine and flattering enough for the most relaxed. For more information please visit the Calavera website, Facebook and Pinterest.

About Keep A Breast:

The Keep A Breast Foundation™ is the leading youth-focused, global, nonprofit breast cancer organization, with mission is to eradicate breast cancer for future generations. Keep A Breast provide support programs for young people impacted by cancer and educate people about prevention, early detection, and cancer-causing toxins in our everyday environment. For more information about Keep A Breast please visit the website, Facebook, and Twitter.

About Kim Saigh:

Kim Saigh is an American tattoo artist and TV personality. She has been tattooing professionally for over 16 years and is best known for her work as a featured tattoo artist on the TLC reality show, LA Ink. Kim previously owned tattoo shop Cherry Bomb Tattoo Studio in Chicago before appearing on the show and now currently works at Memoir Tattoo in Los Angeles.

About Nouvelle Vague:

The launch event will be held at Nouvelle Vague, a unique creative talent agency with 25 years of experience in photography, motion and illustration. Recognized by the Sony World Awards and the International Photography Awards, the agency remains at the top of its league. For more information about Nouvelle Vague please visit the website and Instagram.


No Pain, No Gain, as Tattoo Regret Fueling Laser Removals

By Jason Gale

www.bloomberg.com

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Jimmy McManus slides up his shorts and points a laser at his inked thigh to show how he can blast off unwanted tattoos.

The part-time electrician began offering the service at Chapel Tattoo in Melbourne eight months ago to address a byproduct of the global body art boom: tattoo regret. Removing the skin designs has become a roaring trade, with one in seven people expressing misgivings — some enough to spend thousands of dollars for several searing laser sessions.

‘It’s a painful reminder to choose your tattoos a bit more carefully,’’ McManus, 30, says of the procedure he’s just demonstrated on his leg.

Chapel Tattoo isn’t the only studio to begin offering to undo its handiwork, entering a new line of business as ultrahigh-powered lasers pioneered by dermatologists make the procedure safer and more bearable. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery estimates its practitioner-members did about 96,000 removal procedures last year, 52 percent more than in 2012.

“Tattoo removal is big business,” said Andrew Timming, an associate professor at the University of St Andrews’ school of management in Scotland. Tattoo parlors doubling as removal shops are “a brilliant business model because it creates its own demand.”

It also drives growth in laser devices. Revenue from sales of aesthetic equipment by publicly traded companies expanded 20 percent annually from 2009 to 2012 and is now worth about $1.25 billion, according to Cutera Inc. (CUTR), a supplier of laser and light-based medical devices from Brisbane, California. Israel’s Syneron Medical Ltd. (FDG) says it’s the industry leader, with 28 percent of the global market.

More Ink

One in five U.S. adults has a tattoo, according to a 2012 online survey of 2,016 Americans by the Harris Poll. That’s up from 16 percent in 2008. Many may end up changing their mind. Thirty-seven percent of people with inked skin regretted it after about 14 years, according to a survey of 580 people in the U.K. published in a letter to the British Journal of Dermatology last December.
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Arts In Context | A Moving Canvas

A message from Kate Hellenbrand:

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TODAY is the DAY!!!

PBS SPECIAL airing TONIGHT at 7:30 p.m. here in AUSTIN, Central Time~
Available on line thru their website tomorrow for the rest of the world to see.
This isn’t some crappy “reality” TV SHOW. This is a respectful overview of the real art of tattoo. It’s PBS, people!
I’ve continued to turn down “Ink Disaster” and “Tattoo Titans” and all the other crap thrown at me that is made up and disrespectful to my glorious art/craft. Thankfully, I held out. I am proud. And even though haters will pick it apart, I say: SUCK IT!
I am almost excited enough to buy a TV (which I don’t have) and subscribe to cable (which I won’t do) so gratefully I’m going to watch at Chris Kirkpatrick’s home with his lovely wife Christine. He’s the client
getting the girl with the cobra that you’ll see.

LEMME KNOW WHAT YOU THINK

And we have some photos up on the website: www.artsincontext.org
and also on the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ArtsInContext


Freehand Tattoo by Carl Grace


Stay Humble with Dave Wah: The Exclusive Tattoo Snob Interview

By Kevin Miller
www.tattoosnob.com
I generally excited about everything that’s posted on Tattoo Snob, but I’m really excited about my interview with Dave Wah. Dave has been killing it for a long time, and he recently opened Stay Humble Tattoo Company in Baltimore, Maryland. I shot Dave a handful of questions about his tattooing, opening up a new shop, who inspires him, and what else he has lined up for 2014.
This interview is a must read. If you’re anything like me, you’ll be checking flight prices and planning a tattoo getaway to Baltimore by the end of the interview.
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Tattoo Snob: For those who aren’t familiar with your work, can you give them the basics?
Dave Wah: I guess I would consider myself to be an artist who likes to do a little bit of everything. I’ve been lucky enough to work with some great veteran artists over the years, including Uncle Pauly and Eric Gregory, who really stressed the importance of being versatile. My work ranges from realism to traditional, however I do try to incorporate my own style into everything. I think the range of styles I use keeps me motivated to keep creating. I’m not sure if it’s a good thing or bad thing that I don’t have a particular style, all I know is I love going to work everyday.
TSdave-wah-1-214x300: Let’s talk about Stay Humble Tattoo. Tell us a little about the shop, and what led you to this path.
DW: I opened Stay Humble Tattoo Company in Baltimore, Maryland last october and things have been amazing ever since. The time just seemed right to head out on my own, I’ve developed a large clientele base and I’ve always wanted to work closer to the city. My father has owned his own business for over 35 years and he always taught me the benefits of working for yourself. I also had the benefit of working under Vinnie Myers for the past 5 years, and he is easily one of the most successful people in tattooing.
It’s a second floor shop, and I set it up to be a semi-private studio. There’s limited signage outside and you kind of have to know I’m there to even know it’s a tattoo shop. I tattoo by appointment only and it’s a super laid back environment. It’s kind of nice having a little hidden place to do my work.
TS: Your work ranges from black and grey, to traditional, to neo-traditional, to realistic. How did this come about? Do you have a preferred style?
DW: I think there’s a few factors that led to me doing so many different styles. I think the number one reason is I truly love almost every style of tattooing. I never understood artists who only liked one style and hated everything else. There’s value in so many different styles of tattooing. Another thing that led to me being diverse is my background in realism. As a kid growing up my focus in drawing was realism, so when I got into tattooing I was able to incorporate realistic techniques into traditional tattoo designs. The last reason is that it took me a long time to figure out how to do a solid tattoo, I worked at street shops and I kind of jumped around trying different things to find what was right for me. Tattooing is hard.
My favorite style tends to be illustrated realism, not even sure if that’s an actual style haha.
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TS: With being comfortable in so many different styles, do you suggest different styles based on the subject matter or what the client asks for?
DW: I’m very fortunate that most of my clients tend to let me do whatever style I want. Once they give me the subject of their tattoo I consider what style I think it would look best in, and what style would look best on them. I’m also very aware of my limitations as a tattooer, so I think about how I can utilize my strengths to make the tattoo work.
TS: I see your website states that you no longer do coverups. Why is that? Does this include lasered pieces?
DW: The short answer is that coverups are a pain in the ass and they stress me out. I will cover lasered pieces if they are light enough, I’ll also cover up small tattoos if it’s fairly easy. It’s such a shame that so many people are looking for cover ups these days, unfortunately I think the problem is only going to get worse over time.
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TS: Outside of tattooing, what do you do in your spare time?
DW: Spare time is pretty hard to come by these days, tattooing is pretty much my whole life. When I’m not working or drawing tattoos I spend a lot of time looking at tattoos online, good ones and bad ones. Other than tattoo related stuff I spend a lot of time in my basement studio recording and writing music. I’m really lucky to have a wife that gives me a good amount of freedom.
TS: Which tattoo artists inspire you? What about outside of the tattoo world?
DW: My favorite tattoo artist is Seth Wood. I don’t think I’ve seen a tattoo of his that I didn’t love. Some other artists who constantly amaze me are Jim Sylvia, Stefan Johnsson, Peter Lagergren, Mike Stockings, Emily Rose Murray, and Mike Moses, just to name a handful. I think we’re very fortunate to live in a time when everyone’s work is so readily available to see. I’ve only been tattooing a little over eleven years but I still remember having to wait for new magazines to come out see new work.
TS: Who was the last tattoo artist that tattooed you?
DW: The last two tattoos I got were from Steve Wimmer in Delaware and from Seth Wood when he was still in Brooklyn. Both were really great experiences, it’s really cool to see how every shop has it’s own unique vibe.
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TS: Who do you want to get tattooed by?
DW: I’d love to get tattooed by Jim Sylvia, Grime, and of course Seth Wood again. There’s a bunch of artists in Maryland who I want to get work from, Jason Reeder, Gary Gerhardt, Thomas Kenney, and John Rippey, all those guys are killing it.
TS: Any travel plans for 2014?
DW: I think most of my traveling is done for 2014, my wife and I just had our first baby so I’m gonna hold off on traveling till the end of the year or the beginning of 2015. Between the baby, a new shop, and the new house we just built my plate is pretty full. I usually do about 5-6 conventions a year but I’d like to do a lot more conventions and guest spots in the future. I also need to get back out to see my friends at Memento Tattoo in Columbus, Ohio. Those guys are on another level.
TS: Any last words?
DW: I’m currently looking to set up a steady rotation of guest artists at my shop in Baltimore. Working by myself has been great, but you can learn so much more by working with other artists. If anyone wants to set up a guest spot send me an email to dave@davewah.com with a link to your portfolio. Thanks so much for supporting me and putting my work on your website, it really means the world to me.