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Buddha tattoo woman flies from Sri Lanka ‘with apology’

Source: BBC News

www.bbc.com

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Naomi Colman: “I’ve been treated like a criminal.”

A British tourist arrested in Sri Lanka because she had a Buddha tattoo on her arm said she has been offered a holiday in the country “as an apology”.

Naomi Coleman will arrive in London later, following a deportation order, as a court refused her permission to continue travelling to The Maldives.

Police said she was arrested for “hurting others’ religious feelings”when she arrived at the airport in the Sri Lankan capital Colombo on Monday.

The holiday offer was made as she left.

Ms Coleman, a mental health nurse from Coventry, flew in to Bandaranaike International Airport from India.

Kissing a Buddha

The 37-year-old said she told police she practised Buddhism and had attended meditation retreats and workshops in Thailand, India, Cambodia and Nepal.

Sri Lankan authorities take strict action against perceived insults to Buddhism, which is the religion of the island’s majority ethnic Sinhalese.

In 2013, another British tourist with a tattoo of the Buddha, Antony Ratcliffe, was also denied entry at Colombo’s airport.

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Ms. Coleman’s tattoo shows a buddha sitting on a lotus flower.

A year earlier, three French tourists were given suspended prison sentences for kissing a Buddha statue.

Following Ms Coleman’s deportation order, she spent a night in prison in Negombo and two nights in a detention centre while security checks were carried out.

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Aitchison/Gogue Collaboration Piece

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Back in February of this year as a part of our ongoing professional development webinar series,

TattooNOW and Off the Map Tattoo produced and broadcast an unprecedented live streaming

internet event. A collaboration tattoo from tattoo masters Guy Aitchison and Jeff Gogue,

watched as it happened by over 6000 viewers. Matt McKelvey was the lucky recipient of this

amazing tattoo. Here is his story of the experience…

 

When I saw that TattooNOW was offering the opportunity to be tattooed by Jeff Gogue and Guy

Aitchison, I spent the next few days writing my submission. I treated my entry like a resume,

which was built upon the image of the Heike Crab. I first saw the unique creature and heard its

mythology on Carl Sagan’s Cosmos. My goal was to have elements where both artists could

bring their strengths, but it would be unique enough to be exciting. A few months went by, and I

was honored to find out I had been selected.

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It just so happened that I ended up in the same exact hotel room that I stayed in when I started

my bodysuit. There was some pretty bad weather in Portland that weekend and after a phone

conversation with Jeff, I wasn’t sure if Guy’s plane would be landing. We decided if things fell

through, the least we could do would be to work on my existing tattoo.
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Ladies, Ladies! Art Show 2014

Opening reception May 15, 2014

7-11 pm

at Eight of Swords Tattoo and Gallery,

115 Grand str, 11249 Brooklyn, NY

www.wix.com/ladiesladies/artshow

Curated by Elvia Iannaccone Gezlev and Magie Serpica

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Rose Hardy

An exclusive all ladies group art show featuring some of the most talented female tattooers: from the NYC ladies to international talents, this art show displays different styles and/or techniques, but only one love: tattooing. The show was also and foremost created to pay respect to the ladies who started tattooing first and paved the way for all others to follow, (names like Debra Yarian, Pat Sinatra, Kate Hellenbrandt, Vyvyn Lazonga and few more) in a tough industry, historically male dominated.

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Tai Inglesias

Nowadays we cant help but notice the growing number and variety of skilled female talents taking over the tattoo world!!

The show is curated this year by Elvia Iannaccone Gezlev and Magie Serpica, and it’s at its 3rd edition.

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Bruna Yonashiro

Opening May 15, 2014 at Dave Wallin’s Eight of Swords- Brooklyn studio and gallery, for two months, la crème de la crème of female tattooers art will be on display and for sale.

A chance to buy original art and to meet some of the artists!

Not to be missed!

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Lara Scotton

 

Some of the artists of 2014:

  • STEPHANIE TAMEZ
  • TAI IGLESIAS
  • LARA SCOTTON
  • VICKY MORGAN
  • VIOLA VON HELL
  • MARIE SENA
  • MARIJA RIPLEY
  • DAWN COOKE
  • DEBRA YARIAN
  • HOLLY ELLIS
  • IMME BOHME
  • JACKIE DUNN SMITH
  • JACLYN REHE
  • JAMIE RUTH
  • ROSE HARDY
  • ALIX GE
  • AMY SHAPIRO

 

…… AND MANY MORE!!


Tattoo Artist Magazine: Mike Rubendall Issue #28 Teaser Video

http://youtu.be/-uUy3KBdBfg


Knives & Needles with Alessandra Palotti

By Molly Kitamura

www.knivesandneedlesblog.com

My new and dear friend, Alessandra Palotti is a great tattoo artist and a great cook! Alexandra is Italian from Bologna, Italy where she has been tattooing for over 6 years. Alessandra and her husband, Koji Ichimaru, run their private studio in Bologna, what a beautiful place to live, definitely on my go-to list!

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Alessandra and I got to cook together one day. I made beef Milanese and she made Bolognese sauce. I had never had traditional, authentic Bolognese before and had a completely different idea in my head on how it is made. I learned so much from her that day.

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Here is a mix of Alessandra’s tattoo photos, her recipe and photos of the process. Please enjoy and try out her recipe, it will become a staple in your culinary repertoire!

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Japanese Tattoos as Fine Art

By Liz Ohanesian

Source: www.laweekly.com

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Models show off their tattoos at the opening event for “Perseverance.”

On Saturday afternoon, four tattoo artists went to work inside Little Tokyo’s Japanese American National Museum for the opening of “Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in the Modern World.” They spent hours taking ink and needles to flesh, adding to the large, detailed illustrations that already marked their client’s bodies. Crowds gathered and dispersed throughout the day, watching with interest.

Most seemed unfazed by the buzz of tattoo machines. Many of the onlookers here have gone through a similar process. Some had tattooed sleeves that crawled out from under t-shirts. Others had art that peeked out above collar lines or below hems.

Instead, it was two of those tattoo artists working in silence at their stations who could provoke a wince from the crowd. They were practicing tebori. That’s the traditional Japanese way of applying tattoos. In other words, they were using equipment that wasn’t motorized. The artists dipped their instruments into ink before poking repeatedly at patches of skin on their clients. One lay on his back, an arm crossed over his eyes. His stomach moved with breaths that grew deeper as the prodding persisted. Another remained still on his stomach. From certain angles, you could catch the tension creases form on his face.

Tebori is an old-fashioned way of tattooing, but it’s not antiquated. Takahiro Kitamura, known as Horitaka in tattoo circles, is the curator of “Perseverance.” He notes that there are still plenty of tebori practitioners at work. Many of them choose to use machines to outline the tattoos, he says, but they’ll still use their hands for shading. It’s more than an adherence to tradition. He notes that some believe working by hand makes for a better, longer-lasting tattoo.

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“Perseverance” is an unusual show in that it both documents and celebrates the art of Japanese tattoos, as well as the impact this style of body art has had globally. Tattoos date back to Japan’s ancient history, but flourished during the Edo period. Despite an extensive history, tattoos in Japan aren’t mainstream. In fact, many who have traveled to the country have reported of signs that ban people with tattoos from certain institutions. Even in the U.S., where body art is relatively commonplace, the Japanese style is extreme in comparison to everyday tattoos. These are not your typical daisy on the ankle. Some people invest in full bodysuits. Others may stick with the trunk of the body or limbs.

According to Horitaka, one of the major misconceptions about Japanese tattoos is that they aren’t “fine art.” Tattoos have some similarities with other traditional Japanese art forms that have found homes in museums. Take the names of the artists as an example. A number of the tattoo artists here are known by names that use the prefix “hori.” Horitaka explains that this word means “to dig or carve” and notes that woodblock prints are often signed by artists whose names also begin with “hori.” It is, he says, something that tattoo artists adopted from wood carvers.

In curating this exhibition, Horitaka is challenging the misconceptions about tattoos. Artist and professor Kip Fulbeck photographed numerous human canvases bearing the work of the best artists in the field. Horitaka selected photos that zoomed in on the art, juxtaposing those with full-sized portraits of the people who wear the tattoos. The goal was to explore the diversity within the Japanese tattoo tradition, while making the show as much about the people as it is about the art. It’s a massive collaboration between the curator, the photographer/designer, the tattoo artists and their clients. For the opening day festivities, many of the clients turned up – some traveling to L.A. from Japan – to model work that can take months, even years, to complete.

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Shawn McHenry and Chad Sachman, both from Rancho Cucamonga, are both clients of Inland Empire tattoo artist Espi. They were amongst the models at the exhibition’s opening event. McHenry has a full back tattoo. It took about a year to get that done. He also has work on his leg that’s been in progress for two-and-a-half years. His tattoos tell the story of Kintaro, a folklore hero, and his encounter with a large carp. It’s a tale that relates to McHenry’s work. He owns a koi fish shop and got into the business when he was barely an adult. “If you’re foolish and blind and just want to do it,” he says of the story’s message, “you can succeed.”

Horitaka says that tattoos almost always tell a story. Those may be based in folklore, religion or history. You’ll see narratives unfold down the back, below the buttocks and onto the upper thighs. They might scroll down arms or across the chest.

As Japanese tattoos have increased in popularity, the stories they tell have changed as well. “We’re in a world of fusion now,” says Kitamura. Time-honored tales aren’t the only ones told on skin. Chris “Horishiki” Brand is an artist at Good Time Charlie’s in Anaheim. He’s also part of the L.A.-based art collective UGLAR. For this exhibition, he presented 108 Heroes of Los Angeles. It’s a retelling of Shui Hu Zhuan, a Chinese novel that later made its way to Japan, where it’s known as Suikoden. In this series of tattoos, Brand merges Japanese and Chicano art in a story of rebellion. Photos of the tattoo piece are exhibited in the museum.

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Undoubtedly, with narrative-based pieces as involved as these, getting a Japanese-style tattoo requires a serious commitment. Shawn McHenry once went through three days in a row of tattoo sessions, with each one clocking in at about 12 hours. “It got to the point where we would have to stop because of the smell of flesh,” he says.

He says that there is an endorphin rush that comes with being tattooed. That, however, can wear off when you’re in the lengthy sessions that occur with large pieces. He says that, at a certain point, the pain stays in a specific part of the body. It doesn’t move with the needle. Chad Sachman agrees with that sentiment. Last week, he had work done on his lower back, over the spine. “I was actually feeling the pain in my knee,” he says.

As for the artists, their work requires constant study. Horitaka, who owns a tattoo shop in San Jose, spent several years as an apprentice in the U.S. and another decade studying under a Japanese tattoo master. Although he works solo now, he’s not done learning. He says, “I think I’m always going to be a student of the Japanese tattoo.”


Knives & Needles with Grime

By Molly Kitamura

www.knivesandneedlesblog.com

Grime, Grime, Grime. One of the best tattoo artists in the world! On the slim chance you have not heard of him, he has a shop called Skull and Sword in San Francisco. He is widely known for being a renaissance man of tattooing (and art in general!). What I mean by that is that man consistently crushes any tattoo or style of tattoo requested of him no matter what it is. Grime has created his own style in the process, one that cannot be imitated or replicated although many have tried and failed. Basically you have to see his work for yourself to understand what I am talking about and I highly recommend checking him out!

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But today that is besides the point. Today we are talking Grime and his food! Mr. Grime can also cook (…renaissance man…) and he occasionally sends me photos of his dishes. They always look amazing. The other day he sent me a particularly mouth-watering photo of his pan-fried salmon filet with an oven-roasted yam and sautéed spinach garnished with raisins, pine nuts and a balsamic glaze. That photo had me seriously second-guessing what I had already decided to cook for dinner that night. You can never go wrong with simple yet sophisticated! Check out a few great recipes and some of Grime’s tattoo work below… Cheers!

I will try my best to recreate Grime’s recipes for you all. Try this dish for your next dinner, you will love it!

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Grime’s Pan-fried Salmon Filet With Oven-roasted Yam and Sautéed Spinach

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Tattoo Artist Magazine: Ink N Iron 2011


1300-year-old Egyptian mummy had tattoo of Archangel Michael

By Gene J. Koprowski

www.foxnews.com

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CT scan 3D visualisation of the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman, to show the organs. (TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM)

A mummy of an Egyptian woman dating back to 700 A.D. has been scanned and stripped to reveal a tattoo on her thigh that displays the name of the biblical archangel Michael.

The discovery, announced by researchers at the British Museum over the weekend, was made during a research project that used advanced medical scans, including Computed Tomography (CT) images, to examine Egyptian mummies at a number of hospitals in the United Kingdom last year.

The woman’s body was wrapped in a woolen and linen cloth before burial, and her remains were mummified in the desert heat. As deciphered by curators, the tattoo on her thigh, written in ancient Greek, reads Μιχαήλ, transliterated as M-I-X-A-H-A, or Michael.

Curators at the museum speculate that the tattoo was a symbol worn for religious and spiritual protection, though they declined to offer additional details.

‘Michael is an obvious identity for a tattoo, as this is the most powerful of angels.’
- Maureen Tilley, professor of theology at Fordham University

But other scientists and theologians offered their thoughts on the tattoo’s cultural context.

“There was a sizable Christian population in Egypt in the 700s, perhaps close to a majority of the population,” said Maureen Tilley, professor of theology at Fordham University in New York.

“Like Greeks and Romans across the Mediterranean, the portion of the population that was literate was fascinated by the shapes of letters and delighted in making designs with letters in names. Hence, we have the odd shape of the tattoo composed of the letters.”

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Infra-red reflectography of the tattoo found on the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman. (TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM)

Placing the name of a powerful heavenly protector on one’s body by a tattoo or amulet was very common in antiquity, Tilley told Foxnews.com. “Christian women who were pregnant often placed amulets with divine or angelic names on bands on their abdomens to insure a safe delivery of their child,” she said.

“Placing the name on the inner thigh, as with this mummy, may have had some meaning for the hopes of childbirth or protection against sexual violation, as in ‘This body is claimed and protected.’ Michael is an obvious identity for a tattoo, as this is the most powerful of angels.”

Christian Gnostics, religious cultists in that era, were especially interested in the names and functions of intermediary beings between humans and the divine, Tilley noted.

“The Gospel of Truth and the Book of Enoch were both popular among them and have much about an angel whose story sounds very much like that of Archangel Michael in many Christian stories, the angel who led the heavenly army against Satan and the Fallen Angels.”

She added that Christians were not the only ones to use the names of angelic powers in ancient days. “Jews of antiquity were fascinated by the identity and nature of angels,” she said.

Villanova University biology professor Michael Zimmerman, who also has used advanced technologies to study Egyptian mummies, said this kind of find has been sought for years.

“I did participate in an expedition to the Dakhleh Oasis in Egypt’s western desert several years ago,” he told FoxNews.com. “This was an early Christian site (around 200 AD), and the deceased were still being mummified, by simply being dried in the very hot climate.

“We did not see any tattoos on those mummies, so the British Museum find is remarkable.”

The museum, which is located in London, will reveal what it has learned about this and seven other mummies in “Ancient Lives: New Discoveries,” an exhibition scheduled to run from May 22 to Nov. 30.

John Taylor, lead curator of the ancient Egypt and Sudan department at the museum, told a local newspaper over the weekend that the exhibition will tell the story of the lives of eight people from antiquity, portraying them as full human beings, rather than as archeological objects.

Photograph of the tattoo found on the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman.

Photograph of the tattoo found on the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman. (TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM)

Using sophisticated medical imaging usually reserved to study strokes and heart attacks, the research team discovered that these eight ancient individuals, whose remains have been held in the museum for some time, had many of the same traits that modern man does, including dental problems, high cholesterol levels and tattoos.

The exhibition portrays one mummy that dates back to 3,500 BC, as well as the tattooed female, aged between 20 and 35, who lived and died about 1,300 years ago. Researchers pointed out that regular Egyptians – not only the royals – were mummified.

The tattooed mummy, the remains of which were found less than a decade ago, was so well preserved that archaeologists could nearly discern the tattoo on the inner thigh of her right leg with the naked eye. But medical infrared technology helped them see it clearly.

The Vatican’s school of science, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, did not return multiple requests for comments made by FoxNews.com.


*New* Photos Added To The Gallery

Tattoos by Ryan Willard

www.marionstreettattoo.com

Marrion Street Tattoo, Denver Colorado

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How Tattoo Machines Could be Key to Treating Disfiguring Facial Sores and Even Curing Skin Cancer

By Tom Blackwell 

www.news.nationalpost.com

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo machine can target Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle.

Mention tattooing and health in the same sentence, and chances are the topic is one of the nasty infectious diseases — from HIV to Hep C — that can be transmitted by dirty needles.

A new Canadian study, though, may be about to change that image, suggesting that tattooing equipment could actually be an effective new way to combat an array of skin conditions, penetrating deep enough to deliver drugs to the right cells, but not so far that the needle prods sensitive nerves.

“It’s logical that it works…. But we were amazed”

The just-published research found evidence that tattooing could greatly improve treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a parasite that leaves millions of people worldwide with disfiguring, and often emotionally devastating, facial sores. It affects mainly developing countries, but even Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan have contracted the illness.

The technology, though, could eventually have application in treating skin cancer, psoriasis and other ailments, speculates the scientist behind the project.

Sand-Fly Skin Disease Besets Afghanistan

An Afghan receives treatment for a tropical skin disease. The Afghan capital, Kabul, has one of the highest concentrations of the disfiguring skin disease, Cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a parasitic disease transmitted by the phlebotomine sand fly. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 104492714

“We were extremely excited, very surprised [at the success of the experiment],” said Anny Fortin, a biochemist who did the work at McGill University. “If you think about it, it’s logical that it works.… But we were amazed.”

She cautioned that the initial study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, was conducted on mice, so there is no guarantee the results will translate into humans. The next step is further drug-tattooing work on pigs, whose skin is closer to that of people, and then to try the technique on humans if the animal research is successful.

Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors

A tattoo artist works on a tattoo.

Ms. Fortin said she came up with the idea after talking to a colleague who works for a company that makes tattooing equipment for applying permanent makeup. She obtained funding to explore the novel idea from Grand Challenges Canada — a federally funded agency that finances research on affordable innovations to attack health threats in poor countries.

Leishmaniasis, it turns out, is ripe for some kind of new approach. Caused by a parasite that sand flies transmit, the most dangerous form attacks internal organs and can be fatal.

The more common cutaneous version will not kill, but leaves patients with stigma-inducing ulcers on their faces, sometimes making it difficult for them to find a spouse or otherwise affecting their lives deeply. An estimated 1.5 million new cases are recorded yearly.

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None of the current treatment options are ideal. One drug can be administered systemically, but the intramuscular injections — one a day for a month — are toxic and painful. Hypodermics are also used to deliver the same drug directly into the lesion, also extremely painful.

“I’ve seen children being treated, six people were needed to immobilize the child and this little kid was screaming like crazy,” said Ms. Fortin.

The tattooing machine targets Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle. Ironically, it acts in much the same way as the fly injects the parasite when it bites someone, said Ms. Fortin.

Her study compared treatment of ulcers in mice using the tattooing gear, versus the intramuscular injections, and a topical ointment applied on the ulcer. The tattoo method was the most effective in all cases, clearing up the lesions completely, the study reported.

It is possible the heat generated by the tattooing also helps, triggering inflammation that brings immune cells to attack the pathogen, said Prof. Uzonna.

Ms. Fortin said she is now trying to obtain another round of Grand Challenges funding, which would require her to find matching grants from other sources.


Lit Fuse 10-Year Anniversary Party

Shot and edited by Luke Holley


20 Great Female Tattoo Artists in History Tattooing Over 20 Years

By Dawn Cooke

In honor of women’s history month I have compiled a list of women in the history of tattooing. This is not a complete history by any means. There are hundreds of women throughout time who have contributed to the art form and trade of tattooing. Unfortunately a lot of them have gone unaccounted for.  I have tried to find some of the lesser-known women to highlight here however some of the well-known artists have also been included. I have included women with at least 20 years under their belts. I was overwhelmed with the response to my idea to write this article.

Some of the women earlier on in history who paved the way for us included several sideshow performers. Betty Broadbent and lady Viola are among the most well known. In the 1930’s Mildred Hull was one of the few women tattoo artists working on the bowery in NY.  The beloved Cindy Ray from Australia, tattooed into the year 2007. These ladies have set our roots and our history is being made as we speak. But here are 20 women, most of whom are tattooing still, who deserve recognition for their contributions! These women tattooed long before social media and Reality television. They may not be masters at social media but they are masters of their craft. Take the time too look into these great artists! (In no particular order.)

1.Madame Chinchilla http://triangletattoo.com

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2.Loretta Lue http://leufamilyiron.com

3.Pat Fish http://www.luckyfish.com

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Heartbeat Ink with Jondix

Photos and Interview by Ino Mei

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Jondix spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about his initiation into tattooing, his past as a tattoo nerd, the first tattoo he ever did; at Tas Danazoglou’s neck, his experience in Greece while been Mike the Athens’apprentice and the issue of copying in Dotwork, which he characterizes as “embarrassing”.

What is your actual name? How did the name Jondix come up and what does it mean?

My name is Jondix, that’s who I am. Before Jondix, I was another person. My “baptism” made me the human I am now. During one of the art reunions I used to attend with my friends Ciruelo Cabral, Eva Blank, Heinrich and others, this name came up as a joke, but a year later when Ciruelo published a new book, he used it in the credits and I thought it was a sign and that’s how it started to affect me and change my mind in a more artistic way than before.

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Where you working as an architect in the past? When did you first come into contact with tattoos and how did you get involved with tattooing?

I never worked as an architect. in fact I didn’t even finish the university. After seven years I kinda quit… I needed money and I was into parties and guitars and Harleys and all the typical Mediterranean excess… I saw the first tattoos as a child on people from the army…badly done you know… and then in Boston I saw a good tattoo, a death reaper from Spider Web Tattoo and wanted it immediately. So at eighteen I started getting tattoos, like Steve Vai’s autograph and some stupid biomechs until Tas Danazoglou came to Barcelona and saved me…

Is it true that you were “discovered” by Tas Danazoglou? How did you meet him?

He came to a Barcelona Tattoo Convention and then stayed at the LTW tattoo shop in Barcelona for some years. I got many tattoos from him and we became friends. I was a tattoo nerd already, buying magazines and stuff… I got my first tattoo when I was eighteen, that’s twenty three years ago. There we no tattoo shops in Barcelona like there are today. I was going to tattoo conventions abroad just as a fan and even buying machines just for decoration purposes. Nobody did this in Barcelona, not even the established tattooists. So I knew who Tas was and I knew who Mike the Athens was from “Tattoo Planet” magazine and I wanted to get their more spiritual tattoos, as opposed to the trendy shiny stuff. Then one day on my birthday Tas came home and I played him “Resurrection” by Halford and he in return he showed me how to set up a machine and do a tattoo… and I ended up tattooing a bit on his neck that night…

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To read this full article, visit: http://heartbeatink.gr/en/columns-features/artists-studios-columns-features/jondix/#!prettyPhoto[]/0/


Tattoo Stories Episode 13: Eric Gonzalez

Estevan Oriol